Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Approximation

Approximation Quotes (31 quotes)

...reality is a system, completely ordered and fully intelligible, with which thought in its advance is more and more identifying itself. We may look at the growth of knowledge … as an attempt by our mind to return to union with things as they are in their ordered wholeness…. and if we take this view, our notion of truth is marked out for us. Truth is the approximation of thought to reality … Its measure is the distance thought has travelled … toward that intelligible system … The degree of truth of a particular proposition is to be judged in the first instance by its coherence with experience as a whole, ultimately by its coherence with that further whole, all comprehensive and fully articulated, in which thought can come to rest.
The Nature of Thought (1939), Vol II, 264. Quoted in Erhard Scheibe and Brigitte Falkenburg (ed), Between Rationalism and Empiricism: Selected Papers in the Philosophy of Physics (2001), 233
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Completely (135)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Degree (276)  |  Distance (161)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Growth (187)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Look (582)  |  Marked (55)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rest (280)  |  Return (124)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Union (51)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wholeness (9)

A great man, [who] was convinced that the truths of political and moral science are capable of the same certainty as those that form the system of physical science, even in those branches like astronomy that seem to approximate mathematical certainty.
He cherished this belief, for it led to the consoling hope that humanity would inevitably make progress toward a state of happiness and improved character even as it has already done in its knowledge of the truth.
Describing administrator and economist Anne-Robert-Jacques Turgot in Essai sur l’application de l’analyse à la probabilité des décisions rendues à la pluralité des voix (1785), i. Cited epigraph in Charles Coulston Gillispie, Science and Polity in France: The End of the Old Regime (2004), 3
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Belief (578)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Character (243)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Cherishing (2)  |  Consoling (4)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hope (299)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moral (195)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Truth (1057)

Although this may seem a paradox, all exact science is dominated by the idea of approximation. When a man tells you that he knows the exact truth about anything, you are safe in infering that he is an inexact man. Every careful measurement in science is always given with the probable error ... every observer admits that he is likely wrong, and knows about how much wrong he is likely to be.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Error (321)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inexact (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Safe (54)  |  Science (3879)  |  Tell (340)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wrong (234)

Can quantum mechanics represent the fact that an electron finds itself approximately in a given place and that it moves approximately with a given velocity, and can we make these approximations so close that they do not cause experimental difficulties?
Physics and Beyond: Encounters and Conversations, trans. Arnold J. Pomerans (1971), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electron (93)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Move (216)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Represent (155)  |  Velocity (48)

For terrestrial vertebrates, the climate in the usual meteorological sense of the term would appear to be a reasonable approximation of the conditions of temperature, humidity, radiation, and air movement in which terrestrial vertebrates live. But, in fact, it would be difficult to find any other lay assumption about ecology and natural history which has less general validity. … Most vertebrates are much smaller than man and his domestic animals, and the universe of these small creatures is one of cracks and crevices, holes in logs, dense underbrush, tunnels, and nests—a world where distances are measured in yards rather than miles and where the difference between sunshine and shadow may be the difference between life and death. Actually, climate in the usual sense of the term is little more than a crude index to the physical conditions in which most terrestrial animals live.
From 'Interaction of physiology and behavior under natural conditions', collected in R.I. Bowman (ed.), The Galapagos (1966), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Air (347)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appear (118)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Climate (97)  |  Condition (356)  |  Crack (15)  |  Creature (233)  |  Crude (31)  |  Death (388)  |  Dense (5)  |  Difference (337)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distance (161)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Hole (16)  |  Humidity (3)  |  Index (4)  |  Less (103)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Log (5)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mile (39)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nest (23)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Small (477)  |  Sunshine (10)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Term (349)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Tunnel (13)  |  Underbrush (2)  |  Universe (857)  |  Validity (47)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  World (1774)  |  Yard (7)

Free men are aware of the imperfection inherent in human affairs, and they are willing to fight and die for that which is not perfect. They know that basic human problems can have no final solutions, that our freedom, justice, equality, etc. are far from absolute, and that the good life is compounded of half measures, compromises, lesser evils, and gropings toward the perfect. The rejection of approximations and the insistence on absolutes are the manifestation of a nihilism that loathes freedom, tolerance, and equity.
In The Temper of Our Time (1967), 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Aware (31)  |  Basic (138)  |  Compound (113)  |  Compromise (9)  |  Die (86)  |  Equality (31)  |  Equity (4)  |  Evil (116)  |  Far (154)  |  Fight (44)  |  Final (118)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Good (889)  |  Half (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Affairs (5)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Insistence (12)  |  Justice (39)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lesser (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Loathe (4)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Measure (232)  |  Nihilism (3)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Tolerance (10)  |  Toward (45)  |  Willing (44)

I am particularly concerned to determine the probability of causes and results, as exhibited in events that occur in large numbers, and to investigate the laws according to which that probability approaches a limit in proportion to the repetition of events. That investigation deserves the attention of mathematicians because of the analysis required. It is primarily there that the approximation of formulas that are functions of large numbers has its most important applications. The investigation will benefit observers in identifying the mean to be chosen among the results of their observations and the probability of the errors still to be apprehended. Lastly, the investigation is one that deserves the attention of philosophers in showing how in the final analysis there is a regularity underlying the very things that seem to us to pertain entirely to chance, and in unveiling the hidden but constant causes on which that regularity depends. It is on the regularity of the main outcomes of events taken in large numbers that various institutions depend, such as annuities, tontines, and insurance policies. Questions about those subjects, as well as about inoculation with vaccine and decisions of electoral assemblies, present no further difficulty in the light of my theory. I limit myself here to resolving the most general of them, but the importance of these concerns in civil life, the moral considerations that complicate them, and the voluminous data that they presuppose require a separate work.
Philosophical Essay on Probabilities (1825), trans. Andrew I. Dale (1995), Introduction.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Application (242)  |  Attention (190)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Civil (26)  |  Complication (29)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Constant (144)  |  Data (156)  |  Decision (91)  |  Depend (228)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Error (321)  |  Event (216)  |  Final (118)  |  Formula (98)  |  Function (228)  |  General (511)  |  Government (110)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inoculation (9)  |  Institution (69)  |  Insurance (9)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mean (809)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occur (150)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Present (619)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Question (621)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Separate (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Vaccine (9)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

I consider the differences between man and animals in propensities, feelings, and intellectual faculties, to be the result of the same cause as that which we assign for the variations in other functions, viz. difference of organization; and that the superiority of man in rational endowments is not greater than the more exquisite, complicated, and perfectly developed structure of his brain, and particularly of his ample cerebral hemispheres, to which the rest of the animal kingdom offers no parallel, nor even any near approximation, is sufficient to account for.
Lectures on Physiology, Zoology, and the Natural History of Man (1819), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cause (541)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consider (416)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Endowment (16)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Function (228)  |  Greater (288)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Man (2251)  |  Man And Animals (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Offer (141)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Superiority (19)  |  Variation (90)

I have approximate answers and possible beliefs in different degrees of certainty about different things, but I am not absolutely sure of anything, and of many things I don’t know anything about but I don’t have to know an answer.
Interview, in BBC TV program, 'The Pleasure of Finding Things Out', Horizon (23 Nov 1981). As quoted in Caroline Baillie, Alice Pawley, Donna M. Riley, Engineering and Social Justice: In the University and Beyond (2012), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Possible (552)  |  Thing (1915)

I have no patience with attempts to identify science with measurement, which is but one of its tools, or with any definition of the scientist which would exclude a Darwin, a Pasteur or a Kekulé. The scientist is a practical man and his are practical aims. He does not seek the ultimate but the proximate. He does not speak of the last analysis but rather of the next approximation. His are not those beautiful structures so delicately designed that a single flaw may cause the collapse of the whole. The scientist builds slowly and with a gross but solid kind of masonry. If dissatisfied with any of his work, even if it be near the very foundations, he can replace that part without damage to the remainder. On the whole, he is satisfied with his work, for while science may never be wholly right it certainly is never wholly wrong; and it seems to be improving from decade to decade.
The Anatomy of Science (1926), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Build (204)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Damage (34)  |  Decade (59)  |  Definition (221)  |  Design (195)  |  Dissatisfaction (10)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Improvement (108)  |  August Kekulé (13)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Masonry (4)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Next (236)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Patience (56)  |  Practical (200)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proximate (4)  |  Remainder (7)  |  Right (452)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Single (353)  |  Solid (116)  |  Speak (232)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tool (117)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

I think that it is a relatively good approximation to truth—which is much too complicated to allow anything but approximations—that mathematical ideas originate in empirics.
From 'The Mathematician', collected in James Roy Newman (ed.), The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 4, 2063.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Originate (36)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)

In abstract mathematical theorems, the approximation to absolute truth is perfect. … In physical science, on the contrary, we treat of the least quantities which are perceptible.
In The Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1913), 478.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Least (75)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Perceptible (6)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Treat (35)  |  Truth (1057)

In defining an element let us not take an external boundary, Let us say, e.g., the smallest ponderable quantity of yttrium is an assemblage of ultimate atoms almost infinitely more like each other than they are to the atoms of any other approximating element. It does not necessarily follow that the atoms shall all be absolutely alike among themselves. The atomic weight which we ascribe to yttrium, therefore, merely represents a mean value around which the actual weights of the individual atoms of the “element” range within certain limits. But if my conjecture is tenable, could we separate atom from atom, we should find them varying within narrow limits on each side of the mean.
Address to Annual General Meeting of the Chemical Society (28 Mar 1888), printed in Journal of the Chemical Society (1888), 491.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Actual (117)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Assemblage (17)  |  Atom (355)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Definition (221)  |  Element (310)  |  External (57)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Individual (404)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mean (809)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ponderable (4)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Range (99)  |  Represent (155)  |  Say (984)  |  Separate (143)  |  Side (233)  |  Smallest (9)  |  Tenable (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Value (365)  |  Variation (90)  |  Weight (134)  |  Yttrium (3)

It would appear that Deductive and Demonstrative Sciences are all, without exception, Inductive Sciences: that their evidence is that of experience, but that they are also, in virtue of the peculiar character of one indispensable portion of the general formulae according to which their inductions are made, Hypothetical Sciences. Their conclusions are true only upon certain suppositions, which are, or ought to be, approximations to the truth, but are seldom, if ever, exactly true; and to this hypothetical character is to be ascribed the peculiar certainty, which is supposed to be inherent in demonstration.
In System of Logic, Bk. 2, chap. 6, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Character (243)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Demonstrative (14)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Exception (73)  |  Experience (467)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Hypothetical (5)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Portion (84)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Supposition (50)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Virtue (109)

It would be a mistake to suppose that a science consists entirely of strictly proved theses, and it would be unjust to require this. Only a disposition with a passion for authority will raise such a demand, someone with a craving to replace his religious catechism by another, though it is a scientific one. Science has only a few apodeictic propositions in its catechism: the rest are assertions promoted by it to some particular degree of probability. It is actually a sign of a scientific mode of thought to find satisfaction in these approximations to certainty and to be able to pursue constructive work further in spite of the absence of final confirmation.
In Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis (1916-17).
Science quotes on:  |  Authority (95)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constructive (14)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demand (123)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Passion (114)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Religious (126)  |  Require (219)  |  Rest (280)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spite (55)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thought (953)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Nobody, I suppose, could devote many years to the study of chemical kinetics without being deeply conscious of the fascination of time and change: this is something that goes outside science into poetry; but science, subject to the rigid necessity of always seeking closer approximations to the truth, itself contains many poetical elements.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1956), collected in Nobel Lectures in Chemistry (1999), 474.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Closer (43)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Contain (68)  |  Element (310)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Kinetic (12)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Outside (141)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Seek (213)  |  Something (719)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Year (933)

Objections … inspired Kronecker and others to attack Weierstrass’ “sequential” definition of irrationals. Nevertheless, right or wrong, Weierstrass and his school made the theory work. The most useful results they obtained have not yet been questioned, at least on the ground of their great utility in mathematical analysis and its implications, by any competent judge in his right mind. This does not mean that objections cannot be well taken: it merely calls attention to the fact that in mathematics, as in everything else, this earth is not yet to be confused with the Kingdom of Heaven, that perfection is a chimaera, and that, in the words of Crelle, we can only hope for closer and closer approximations to mathematical truth—whatever that may be, if anything—precisely as in the Weierstrassian theory of convergent sequences of rationals defining irrationals.
In Men of Mathematics (1937), 431-432.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attention (190)  |  Call (769)  |  Chimera (9)  |  Close (69)  |  Closer (43)  |  Competent (20)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Convergent (3)  |  Define (49)  |  Definition (221)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Implication (23)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Judge (108)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Kingdom Of Heaven (3)  |  Leopold Kronecker (6)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Objection (32)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Question (621)  |  Rational (90)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  School (219)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Sequential (2)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Useful (250)  |  Utility (49)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

Ohm found that the results could be summed up in such a simple law that he who runs may read it, and a schoolboy now can predict what a Faraday then could only guess at roughly. By Ohm's discovery a large part of the domain of electricity became annexed by Coulomb's discovery of the law of inverse squares, and completely annexed by Green's investigations. Poisson attacked the difficult problem of induced magnetisation, and his results, though differently expressed, are still the theory, as a most important first approximation. Ampere brought a multitude of phenomena into theory by his investigations of the mechanical forces between conductors supporting currents and magnets. Then there were the remarkable researches of Faraday, the prince of experimentalists, on electrostatics and electrodynamics and the induction of currents. These were rather long in being brought from the crude experimental state to a compact system, expressing the real essence. Unfortunately, in my opinion, Faraday was not a mathematician. It can scarely be doubted that had he been one, he would have anticipated much later work. He would, for instance, knowing Ampere's theory, by his own results have readily been led to Neumann’s theory, and the connected work of Helmholtz and Thomson. But it is perhaps too much to expect a man to be both the prince of experimentalists and a competent mathematician.
From article 'Electro-magnetic Theory II', in The Electrician (16 Jan 1891), 26, No. 661, 331.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Attack (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Compact (13)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Connect (125)  |  Charles-Augustin Coulomb (3)  |  Crude (31)  |  Current (118)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Domain (69)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Electromagnetism (18)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Essence (82)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Express (186)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Green (63)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hermann von Helmholtz (28)  |  Induction (77)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Ohm (5)  |  Georg Simon Ohm (3)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Siméon-Denis Poisson (7)  |  Predict (79)  |  Problem (676)  |  Read (287)  |  Result (677)  |  Run (174)  |  Simple (406)  |  Square (70)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Sir J.J. Thomson (18)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Work (1351)

Our treatment of this science will be adequate, if it achieves the amount of precision which belongs to its subject matter.
Aristotle
In Nicomachean Ethics, Book 1, Chap 3. In Harris Rackham (trans.), Aristotle’s Ethics for English Readers (1943), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  Amount (151)  |  Belong (162)  |  Educate (13)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Possible (552)  |  Precision (68)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Subject (521)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Will (2355)

Rules of Thumb
Thumb’s First Postulate: It is better to use a crude approximation and know the truth, plus or minus 10 percent, than demand an exact solution and know nothing at all.
Thumb’s Second Postulate: An easily understood, workable falsehood is more useful than a complex incomprehensible truth.
Anonymous
In Arthur Bloch, The Complete Murphy's Law: A Definitive Collection (1991), 126.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Crude (31)  |  Demand (123)  |  Ease (35)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  First (1283)  |  Incomprehensibility (2)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plus (43)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Rule (294)  |  Rule Of Thumb (3)  |  Solution (267)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

Science has hitherto been proceeding without the guidance of any rational theory of logic, and has certainly made good progress. It is like a computer who is pursuing some method of arithmetical approximation. Even if he occasionally makes mistakes in his ciphering, yet if the process is a good one they will rectify themselves. But then he would approximate much more rapidly if he did not commit these errors; and in my opinion, the time has come when science ought to be provided with a logic. My theory satisfies me; I can see no flaw in it. According to that theory universality, necessity, exactitude, in the absolute sense of these words, are unattainable by us, and do not exist in nature. There is an ideal law to which nature approximates; but to express it would require an endless series of modifications, like the decimals expressing surd. Only when you have asked a question in so crude a shape that continuity is not involved, is a perfectly true answer attainable.
Letter to G. F. Becker, 11 June 1893. Merrill Collection, Library of Congress. Quoted in Nathan Reingold, Science in Nineteenth-Century America: A Documentary History (1966), 231-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  According (237)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Commit (41)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Computer (127)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Crude (31)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endless (56)  |  Error (321)  |  Exactitude (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Express (186)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Good (889)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Involved (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Logic (287)  |  Method (505)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Provision (16)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Require (219)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Has Come (8)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universality (22)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Science is the art of the appropriate approximation. While the flat earth model is usually spoken of with derision it is still widely used. Flat maps, either in atlases or road maps, use the flat earth model as an approximation to the more complicated shape.
In 'On the Nature of Science', Physics in Canada (Jan/Feb 2007), 63, No. 1, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Art (657)  |  Atlas (3)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Derision (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flat (33)  |  Flat Earth (3)  |  Map (44)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shape (72)  |  Still (613)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)

Take the so called standard of living. What do most people mean by “living”? They don’t mean living. They mean the latest and closest plural approximation to singular prenatal passivity which science, in its finite but unbounded wisdom, has succeeded in selling their wives.
Introduction, Poems (1954).
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Do (1908)  |  Finite (59)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Science (3879)  |  Selling (6)  |  Singular (23)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Wisdom (221)

The history of mathematics, as of any science, is to some extent the story of the continual replacement of one set of misconceptions by another. This is of course no cause for despair, for the newly instated assumptions very often possess the merit of being closer approximations to truth than those that they replace.
In 'Consistency and Completeness—A Résumé', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1956), 63, No.5, 295.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (92)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Closer (43)  |  Continual (43)  |  Course (409)  |  Despair (40)  |  Extent (139)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mathematics (7)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merit (50)  |  Misconception (5)  |  Possess (156)  |  Replacement (12)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Set (394)  |  Story (118)  |  Truth (1057)

The scientist explores the world of phenomena by successive approximations. He knows that his data are not precise and that his theories must always be tested. It is quite natural that he tends to develop healthy skepticism, suspended judgment, and disciplined imagination.
In Commencement Address, California Institute of Technology (10 Jun 1938), 'Experiment and Experience'. Collected in abridged form in The Huntington Library Quarterly (Apr 1939), 2, No. 3, 245
Science quotes on:  |  Data (156)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Precise (68)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Successive (73)  |  Suspend (9)  |  Tend (124)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  World (1774)

Unless our laboratory results are to give us artificialities, mere scientific curiosities, they must be subjected to interpretation by gradual re-approximation to conditions of life.
'Psychology and Social Practice', The Psychological Review, 1900, 7, 119.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (356)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Life (1795)  |  Must (1526)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Subject (521)

Until now, physical theories have been regarded as merely models with approximately describe the reality of nature. As the models improve, so the fit between theory and reality gets closer. Some physicists are now claiming that supergravity is the reality, that the model and the real world are in mathematically perfect accord.
Superforce (1984, 1985), 149.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Claim (146)  |  Claiming (8)  |  Closer (43)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Fit (134)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  Model (102)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reality (261)  |  Regard (305)  |  Theory (970)  |  World (1774)

We have here no esoteric theory of the ultimate nature of concepts, nor a philosophical championing of the primacy of the 'operation'. We have merely a pragmatic matter, namely that we have observed after much experience that if we want to do certain kinds of things with our concepts, our concepts had better be constructed in certain ways. In fact one can see that the situation here is no different from what we always find when we push our analysis to the limit; operations are not ultimately sharp or irreducible any more than any other sort of creature. We always run into a haze eventually, and all our concepts are describable only in spiralling approximation.
Reflections of a Physicist (1950 ), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Better (486)  |  Certain (550)  |  Concept (221)  |  Construct (124)  |  Creature (233)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Esoteric (3)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Kind (557)  |  Limit (280)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observed (149)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Push (62)  |  Run (174)  |  See (1081)  |  Situation (113)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)

[After the flash of the atomic bomb test explosion] Fermi got up and dropped small pieces of paper … a simple experiment to measure the energy liberated by the explosion … [W]hen the front of the shock wave arrived (some seconds after the flash) the pieces of paper were displaced a few centimeters in the direction of propagation of the shock wave. From the distance of the source and from the displacement of the air due to the shock wave, he could calculate the energy of the explosion. This Fermi had done in advance having prepared himself a table of numbers, so that he could tell immediately the energy liberated from this crude but simple measurement. … It is also typical that his answer closely approximated that of the elaborate official measurements. The latter, however, were available only after several days’ study of the records, whereas Fermi had his within seconds.
In Enrico Fermi: Physicist (1970), 147-148.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  Answer (366)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Available (78)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Crude (31)  |  Direction (175)  |  Displacement (9)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Dropping (8)  |  Due (141)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Energy (344)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Enrico Fermi (19)  |  Flash (49)  |  Himself (461)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Number (699)  |  Paper (182)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Record (154)  |  Second (62)  |  Shock (37)  |  Shock Wave (2)  |  Simple (406)  |  Small (477)  |  Study (653)  |  Table (104)  |  Tell (340)  |  Test (211)  |  Trinity (9)  |  Wave (107)

[It] may be laid down as a general rule that, if the result of a long series of precise observations approximates a simple relation so closely that the remaining difference is undetectable by observation and may be attributed to the errors to which they are liable, then this relation is probably that of nature.
'Mémoire sur les Inégalites Séculaires des Planètes et des Satellites' (I 785, published 1787). In Oeuvres completes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 11, 57, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Approximate (25)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Difference (337)  |  Down (456)  |  Error (321)  |  General (511)  |  Long (790)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Relation (157)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Series (149)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Undetectable (3)

George E.P. Box quote: …all models are approximations. Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful. However,
[Co-author with Norman R. Draper] (source)
…all models are approximations. Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful. However, the approximate nature of the model must always be borne in mind… [Co-author with Norman R. Draper]
In George E.P. Box, Norman R. Draper, Response Surfaces, Mixtures, and Ridge Analyses (2nd ed. 2007), 414.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Author (167)  |  Essential (199)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Wrong (234)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.