Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index L > Category: Logician

Logician Quotes (17 quotes)

From a drop of water a logician could predict an Atlantic or a Niagara without having seen or heard of one or the other. So all life is a great chain, the nature of which is known whenever we are shown a single link of it.
In A Study in Scarlet (1887, 1892), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atlantic (8)  |  Chain (50)  |  Drop (76)  |  Great (1574)  |  Known (454)  |  Life (1795)  |  Link (43)  |  Logic (287)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Niagara (8)  |  Other (2236)  |  Predict (79)  |  Single (353)  |  Water (481)  |  Whenever (81)

Humanism is only another name for spiritual laziness, or a vague half-creed adopted by men of science and logicians whose heads are too occupied with the world of mathematics and physics to worry about religious categories.
In The Outsider (1956), 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Creed (27)  |  Laziness (8)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Name (333)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Vague (47)  |  World (1774)  |  Worry (33)

If we may believe our logicians, man is distinguished from all other creatures by the faculty of laughter.
In The Spectator (26 Sep 1712), No. 494, as collected in Vol. 7 (1729, 10th ed.), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Creature (233)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Man (2251)  |  Other (2236)

Logic has borrowed the rules of geometry without understanding its power. … I am far from placing logicians by the side of geometers who teach the true way to guide the reason. … The method of avoiding error is sought by every one. The logicians profess to lead the way, the geometers alone reach it, and aside from their science there is no true demonstration.
From De l’Art de Persuader, (1657). Pensées de Pascal (1842), Part 1, Article 3, 41-42. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 202. From the original French, “La logique a peut-être emprunté les règles de la géométrie sans en comprendre la force … je serai bien éloigné de les mettre en parallèle avec les géomètres, qui apprennent la véritable méthode de conduire la raison. … La méthode de ne point errer est recherchée de tout le monde. Les logiciens font profession d'y conduire, les géomètres seuls y arrivent; et, hors de leur science …, il n'y a point de véritables démonstrations ….”
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Error (321)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Guide (97)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics And Logic (12)  |  Method (505)  |  Power (746)  |  Profess (20)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Side (233)  |  Teach (277)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Way (1217)

Logicians have but ill defined
As rational the human mind;
Reason, they say, belongs to man,
But let them prove it if they can.
In 'The Logicians Refuted', The Poems and Plays of Oliver Goldsmith (1818), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)

Men of science belong to two different types—the logical and the intuitive. Science owes its progress to both forms of minds. Mathematics, although a purely logical structure, nevertheless makes use of intuition. Among the mathematicians there are intuitives and logicians, analysts and geometricians. Hermite and Weierstrass were intuitives. Riemann and Bertrand, logicians. The discoveries of intuition have always to be developed by logic.
In Man the Unknown (1935), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Analyst (8)  |  Belong (162)  |  Joseph Bertrand (6)  |  Both (493)  |  Develop (268)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Charles Hermite (10)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Owe (71)  |  Progress (465)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purely (109)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Structure (344)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Use (766)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)

Non-standard analysis frequently simplifies substantially the proofs, not only of elementary theorems, but also of deep results. This is true, e.g., also for the proof of the existence of invariant subspaces for compact operators, disregarding the improvement of the result; and it is true in an even higher degree in other cases. This state of affairs should prevent a rather common misinterpretation of non-standard analysis, namely the idea that it is some kind of extravagance or fad of mathematical logicians. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Rather, there are good reasons to believe that non-standard analysis, in some version or other, will be the analysis of the future.
In 'Remark on Non-standard Analysis' (1974), in S. Feferman (ed.), Kurt Gödel Collected Works: Publications 1938-1974 (1990), Vol. 2, 311.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Common (436)  |  Compact (13)  |  Deep (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fad (10)  |  Farther (51)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Kind (557)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  State (491)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

Our science, in contrast with others, is not founded on a single period of human history, but has accompanied the development of culture through all its stages. Mathematics is as much interwoven with Greek culture as with the most modern problems in Engineering. She not only lends a hand to the progressive natural sciences but participates at the same time in the abstract investigations of logicians and philosophers.
In Klein und Riecke: Ueber angewandte Mathematik und Physik (1900), 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accompany (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Culture (143)  |  Development (422)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Founded (20)  |  Greek (107)  |  Help (105)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human History (5)  |  Interwoven (10)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Other (2236)  |  Participate (8)  |  Period (198)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Stage (143)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)

Since the examination of consistency is a task that cannot be avoided, it appears necessary to axiomatize logic itself and to prove that number theory and set theory are only parts of logic. This method was prepared long ago (not least by Frege’s profound investigations); it has been most successfully explained by the acute mathematician and logician Russell. One could regard the completion of this magnificent Russellian enterprise of the axiomatization of logic as the crowning achievement of the work of axiomatization as a whole.
Address (11 Sep 1917), 'Axiomatisches Denken' delivered before the Swiss Mathematical Society in Zürich. Translated by Ewald as 'Axiomatic Thought', (1918), in William Bragg Ewald, From Kant to Hilbert (1996), Vol. 2, 1113.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Acute (7)  |  Appear (118)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Completion (22)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Crown (38)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Examination (98)  |  Explain (322)  |  Gottlob Frege (11)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Least (75)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Number (699)  |  Number Theory (6)  |  Prepared (5)  |  Profound (104)  |  Prove (250)  |  Regard (305)  |  Bertrand Russell (184)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Theory (6)  |  Successful (123)  |  Task (147)  |  Theory (970)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

The mathematical conception is, from its very nature, abstract; indeed its abstractness is usually of a higher order than the abstractness of the logician.
In 'Mathematics', Encyclopedia Britannica (1883), Vol. 15, 636.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Conception (154)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics And Logic (12)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Usually (176)

The maxim is, that whatever can be affirmed (or denied) of a class, may be affirmed (or denied) of everything included in the class. This axiom, supposed to be the basis of the syllogistic theory, is termed by logicians the dictum de omni et nullo.
A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive (1858), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (63)  |  Basis (173)  |  Class (164)  |  Dictum (9)  |  Everything (476)  |  Logic (287)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Syllogism (8)  |  Term (349)  |  Theory (970)  |  Whatever (234)

The one [the logician] studies the science of drawing conclusions, the other [the mathematician] the science which draws necessary conclusions.
In Charles S. Peirce, ‎Charles Hartshorne (ed.), ‎Paul Weiss (ed.), Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce (1931), Vol. 4, 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)

To understand this for sense it is not required that a man should be a geometrician or a logician, but that he should be mad.
In Thomas Hobbes and William Molesworth (ed.), 'Considerations Upon the Answer of Doctor Wallis to the Three Papers of Mr. Hobbes', Leviathan: Or the Matter, Form and Power of a Commonwealth Ecclesiastical and Civil (1845), Vol. 7, 445. What Hobbes refers to as “this” is described as “that the volume generated by revolving the region under 1/x from 1 to infinity has finite volume,” in In Nicholas J. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims (1988).
Science quotes on:  |  Geometry (255)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Sense (770)  |  Understand (606)

We know that mathematicians care no more for logic than logicians for mathematics. The two eyes of science are mathematics and logic; the mathematical set puts out the logical eye, the logical set puts out the mathematical eye; each believing that it sees better with one eye than with two.
Note that De Morgan, himself, only had sight with only one eye.
Review of a book on geometry in the Athenaeum, 1868, Vol. 2, 71-73.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Care (186)  |  Eye (419)  |  Himself (461)  |  Know (1518)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics And Logic (12)  |  More (2559)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  Sight (132)  |  Two (937)

What is this subject, which may be called indifferently either mathematics or logic? Is there any way in which we can define it? Certain characteristics of the subject are clear. To begin with, we do not, in this subject, deal with particular things or particular properties: we deal formally with what can be said about any thing or any property. We are prepared to say that one and one are two, but not that Socrates and Plato are two, because, in our capacity of logicians or pure mathematicians, we have never heard of Socrates or Plato. A world in which there were no such individuals would still be a world in which one and one are two. It is not open to us, as pure mathematicians or logicians, to mention anything at all, because, if we do so we introduce something irrelevant and not formal.
In Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy (1920), 196-197.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Begin (260)  |  Call (769)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear (100)  |  Deal (188)  |  Do (1908)  |  Formal (33)  |  Hear (139)  |  Individual (404)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Never (1087)  |  Open (274)  |  Particular (76)  |  Plato (76)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Say (984)  |  Socrates (16)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

When the greatest of American logicians, speaking of the powers that constitute the born geometrician, had named Conception, Imagination, and Generalization, he paused. Thereupon from one of the audience there came the challenge, “What of reason?” The instant response, not less just than brilliant, was: “Ratiocination—that is but the smooth pavement on which the chariot rolls.”
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Audience (26)  |  Bear (159)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chariot (9)  |  Conception (154)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Instant (45)  |  Less (103)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Pause (6)  |  Pavement (2)  |  Power (746)  |  Ratiocination (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Response (53)  |  Roll (40)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)

When the logician has resolved each demonstration into a host of elementary operations, all of them correct, he will not yet be in possession of the whole reality, that indefinable something that constitutes the unity ... Now pure logic cannot give us this view of the whole; it is to intuition that we must look for it.
Science and Method (1914 edition, reprint 2003), 126.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Correct (86)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Indefinable (5)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Logic (287)  |  Look (582)  |  Must (1526)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Possession (65)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reality (261)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Something (719)  |  Unity (78)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.