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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Sediment

Sediment Quotes (7 quotes)

All admit that the mountains of the globe are situated mostly along the border regions of the continents (taking these regions as 300 to 1000 miles or more in width), and that over these same areas the sedimentary deposits have, as a general thing, their greatest thickness. At first thought, it would seem almost incredible that the upliftings of mountains, whatever their mode of origin, should have taken place just where the earth’s crust, through these sedimentary accumulations, was the thickest, and where, therefore, there was the greatest weight to be lifted. … Earthquakes show that even now, in this last of the geological ages, the same border regions of the continents, although daily thickening from the sediments borne to the ocean by rivers, are the areas of the greatest and most frequent movements of the earth’s crust. (1866)
[Thus, the facts were known long ago; the explanation by tectonic activity came many decades later.]
In 'Observations on the Origin of Some of the Earth's Features', The American Journal of Science (Sep 1866), Second Series, 42, No. 125, 210-211.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (29)  |  Border (8)  |  Continent (48)  |  Crust (17)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Earth (582)  |  Earthquake (27)  |  Mountain (132)  |  Ocean (138)  |  Origin (78)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  River (75)  |  Thickness (4)  |  Uplift (4)  |  Weight (68)

By the agitation of water and silt, and their gradual accumulation and consolidation... the rocks were formed gradually by the evolution of sediments in water.
Ye Zi-qi
Cao Mu Zi (1959), trans. Yang, Jing-Yi, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (29)  |  Agitation (6)  |  Consolidation (3)  |  Formation (56)  |  Gradual (19)  |  Rock (118)  |  Water (264)

I have said that the investigation for which the teeth of the shark had furnished an opportunity, was very near an end... But thereafter, while I was examining more carefully these details of both places and bodies [sedimentary deposits and shells], these day by day presented points of doubt to me as they followed one another in indissoluble connection, so that I saw myself again and again brought back to the starting-place, as it were, when I thought I was nearest the goal. I might compare those doubts to the heads of the Lernean Hydra, since when one of them had been got rid of, numberless others were born; at any rate, I saw that I was wandering about in a sort of labyrinth, where the nearer one approaches the exit, the wider circuits does one tread.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (206)  |  Care (80)  |  Circuit (13)  |  Detail (68)  |  Doubt (125)  |  End (161)  |  Examination (61)  |  Exit (4)  |  Hydra (2)  |  Investigation (124)  |  Labyrinth (9)  |  Opportunity (50)  |  Place (133)  |  Shark (7)  |  Shell (36)  |  Tooth (23)  |  Tread (10)  |  Wandering (5)

It is ... indisputable that the orogenic movements which uplift the hills have been at the basis of geological history. To them the great accumulation of sediments which now form so large a part of continental land are mainly due. There can be no doubt of the fact that these movements have swayed the entire history, both inorganic and organic, of the world in which we live.
John Joly
Radioactivity and Geology (1909), 115-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Geology (190)  |  Mountain (132)

The edge of the sea is a strange and beautiful place. All through the long history of Earth it has been an area of unrest where waves have broken heavily against the land, where the tides have pressed forward over the continents, receded, and then returned. For no two suc-cessive days is the shore line precisely the same. Not only do the tides advance and retreat in their eternal rhythms, but the level of the sea itself is never at rest. It rises or falls as the glaciers melt or grow, as the floor of the deep ocean basins shifts under its increasing load of sediments, or as the Earth’s crust along the continental margins warps up or down in adjustment to strain and tension. Today a little more land may belong to the sea, tomorrow a little less. Always the edge of the sea remains an elusive and indefinable boundary.
The Edge of the Sea
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (14)  |  Advance (128)  |  Area (22)  |  Basin (2)  |  Beautiful (108)  |  Belong (40)  |  Boundary (30)  |  Break (41)  |  Continent (48)  |  Crust (17)  |  Deep (99)  |  Down (73)  |  Earth (582)  |  Edge (20)  |  Elusive (6)  |  Eternal (48)  |  Fall (99)  |  Floor (17)  |  Forward (30)  |  Glacier (16)  |  Grow (78)  |  Heavily (4)  |  History Of Earth (2)  |  Increase (116)  |  Indefinable (2)  |  Land (104)  |  Less (72)  |  Level (57)  |  Line (57)  |  Little (150)  |  Load (8)  |  Long (125)  |  Margin (6)  |  Melt (16)  |  Ocean (138)  |  Place (133)  |  Precisely (13)  |  Press (17)  |  Recede (2)  |  Remain (82)  |  Rest (72)  |  Retreat (10)  |  Return (39)  |  Rhythm (15)  |  Rise (64)  |  Same (107)  |  Sea (170)  |  Shift (26)  |  Shore (23)  |  Strain (9)  |  Strange (67)  |  Tension (7)  |  Tide (21)  |  Today (100)  |  Tomorrow (34)  |  Unrest (2)  |  Warp (5)  |  Wave (58)

The mutton in the study gathered over it a thick blanket of Penicillium. On the 13th [December 1875] it had assumed a light brown colour as if by a faint admixture of clay; but the infusion became transparent. The ‘clay’ here was the slime of dead or dormant Bacteria, the cause of their quiescence being the blanket of Penicillium. I found no active life in this tube, while all the others swarmed with Bacteria. In every case where the mould was thick and coherent the Bacteria died, or became dormant, and fell to the bottom of the sediment … The Bacteria which manufacture a green pigment appear to be uniformly victorious in their fight with the Penicillium.
From paper read to the Royal Institution (1 Jan 1876). In 'Professor Tyndall on the Optical Deportment of the Atmosphere in Relation to Putrefaction and Infection' , Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London (1876), 166, 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Bacteria (32)  |  Blanket (8)  |  Bottom (30)  |  Brown (6)  |  Clay (9)  |  Coherence (8)  |  Death (277)  |  Dormant (3)  |  Fight (40)  |  Green (27)  |  Infusion (3)  |  Life (993)  |  Light (301)  |  Manufacturing (21)  |  Mold (26)  |  Mutton (2)  |  Penicillium (2)  |  Pigment (7)  |  Slime (5)  |  Study (349)  |  Swarm (11)  |  Victory (24)

When I think of the floor of the deep sea, the single, overwhelming fact that possesses my imagination is the accumulation of sediments.
(1961).
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (29)  |  Deep Sea (9)  |  Floor (17)  |  Oceanography (16)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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