Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Rose

Rose Quotes (34 quotes)

1839—The fermentation satire
THE MYSTERY OF ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION RESOLVED
(Preliminary Report by Letter) Schwindler
I am about to develop a new theory of wine fermentation … Depending on the weight, these seeds carry fermentation to completion somewhat less than as in the beginning, which is understandable … I shall develop a new theory of wine fermentation [showing] what simple means Nature employs in creating the most amazing phenomena. I owe it to the use of an excellent microscope designed by Pistorius.
When brewer’s yeast is mixed with water the microscope reveals that the yeast dissolves into endless small balls, which are scarcely 1/800th of a line in diameter … If these small balls are placed in sugar water, it can be seen that they consist of the eggs of animals. As they expand, they burst, and from them develop small creatures that multiply with unbelievable rapidity in a most unheard of way. The form of these animals differs from all of the 600 types described up until now. They possess the shape of a Beinsdorff still (without the cooling apparatus). The head of the tube is a sort of proboscis, the inside of which is filled with fine bristles 1/2000th of a line long. Teeth and eyes are not discernible; however, a stomach, intestinal canal, anus (a rose red dot), and organs for secretion of urine are plainly discernible. From the moment they are released from the egg one can see these animals swallow the sugar from the solution and pass it to the stomach. It is digested immediately, a process recognized easily by the resultant evacuation of excrements. In a word, these infusors eat sugar, evacuate ethyl alcohol from the intestinal canal, and carbon dioxide from the urinary organs. The bladder, in the filled state, has the form of a champagne bottle; when empty, it is a small button … As soon as the animals find no more sugar present, they eat each other up, which occurs through a peculiar manipulation; everything is digested down to the eggs which pass unchanged through the intestinal canal. Finally, one again fermentable yeast, namely the seed of the animals, which remain over.
In 'Das entriithselle Geheimiss der geisligen Giihrung', Annalen der Pharmacie und Chemie (1839), 29, 100-104; adapted from English translalion by Ralph E. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 203-205.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Burst (39)  |  Canal (17)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Carry (127)  |  Completion (22)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Creature (233)  |  Design (195)  |  Develop (268)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Differ (85)  |  Discernible (9)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dot (16)  |  Down (456)  |  Eat (104)  |  Egg (69)  |  Employ (113)  |  Empty (80)  |  Endless (56)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expand (53)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Letter (109)  |  Long (790)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Pass (238)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Proboscis (2)  |  Process (423)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Satire (4)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  See (1081)  |  Seed (93)  |  Simple (406)  |  Small (477)  |  Solution (267)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Type (167)  |  Unbelievable (7)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Urine (16)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wine (38)  |  Word (619)  |  Yeast (7)

Galileo head and shoulders on starfield, w/earth in orbit around him with quotes “Eppur si muove” (Italian)+“And yet it moves”
By legend (likely not in fact), Galileo quietly whispered this to himself, after his confession.
Eppur si muove.
And yet it does move.
Referring to the Earth. Apocryphal saying (of doubtful authenticity). By legend, Galileo whispered this to himself as he rose from kneeling after making his abjuration of heliocentricity.
No clear evidence exists that Galileo actually said these words, which may have been invented as stories about Galileo were circulated after his death. Seen in print as early as L’Abbé Irailh, Querelles Littéraires [“Literary quarrels”] (Paris, 1761), Vol. 3, 49. As cited, with great skepticism, in John Joseph Fahie, Galileo, His Life and Work (1903), 325.
Science quotes on:  |  Abjuration (2)  |  Authenticity (5)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Earth (996)  |  Heliocentric Model (7)  |  Himself (461)  |  Legend (17)  |  Making (300)  |  Move (216)  |  Whisper (11)

I believe in logic, the sequence of cause and effect, and in science its only begotten son our law, which was conceived by the ancient Greeks, thrived under Isaac Newton, suffered under Albert Einstein…
That fragment of a 'creed for materialism' which a friend in college had once shown him rose through Donald's confused mind.
Stand on Zanzibar (1969)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  College (66)  |  Creed (27)  |  Effect (393)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Friend (168)  |  Greek (107)  |  Law (894)  |  Logic (287)  |  Materialism (11)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Through (849)

Qu'une goutee de vin tombe dans un verre d'eau; quelle que soit la loi du movement interne du liquide, nous verrons bientôt se colorer d'une teinte rose uniforme et à partir de ce moment on aura beau agiter le vase, le vin et l'eau ne partaîtront plus pouvoir se séparer. Tout cela, Maxwell et Boltzmann l'ont expliqué, mais celui qui l'a vu plus nettement, dans un livre trop peu lu parce qu'il est difficile à lire, c'est Gibbs dans ses principes de la Mécanique Statistique.
Let a drop of wine fall into a glass of water; whatever be the law that governs the internal movement of the liquid, we will soon see it tint itself uniformly pink and from th at moment on, however we may agitate the vessel, it appears that the wine and water can separate no more. All this, Maxwell and Boltzmann have explained, but the one who saw it in the cleanest way, in a book that is too little read because it is difficult to read, is Gibbs, in his Principles of Statistical Mechanics.
La valeur de la science. In Anton Bovier, Statistical Mechanics of Disordered Systems (2006), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ludwig Eduard Boltzmann (17)  |  Book (392)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Drop (76)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fall (230)  |  Gibbs_Josiah (2)  |  Glass (92)  |  Govern (64)  |  Internal (66)  |  Law (894)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Little (707)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Plus (43)  |  Principle (507)  |  Read (287)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Soon (186)  |  Statistical Mechanics (7)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wine (38)

Thomasina: Every week I plot your equations dot for dot, x’s against y’s in all manner of algebraical relation, and every week they draw themselves as commonplace geometry, as if the world of forms were nothing but arcs and angles. God’s truth, Septimus, if there is an equation for a curve like a bell, there must be an equation for one like a bluebell, and if a bluebell, why not a rose? Do we believe nature is written in numbers?
Septimus: We do.
Thomasina: Then why do your shapes describe only the shapes of manufacture?
Septimus: I do not know.
Thomasina: Armed thus, God could only make a cabinet.
In the play, Acadia (1993), Scene 3, 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arc (12)  |  Arm (81)  |  Armed (2)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bell (35)  |  Cabinet (4)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Curve (49)  |  Describe (128)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dot (16)  |  Draw (137)  |  Equation (132)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometry (255)  |  God (757)  |  Know (1518)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Plot (11)  |  Relation (157)  |  Shape (72)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Week (70)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)  |  Written (6)

A rose is the visible result of an infinitude of complicated goings on in the bosom of the earth and in the air above, and similarly a work of art is the product of strange activities in the human mind.
In Since Cezanne (1922), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  Art (657)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Earth (996)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Product (160)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Similarly (4)  |  Strange (157)  |  Visible (84)  |  Work (1351)

A small cabin stands in the Glacier Peak Wilderness, about a hundred yards off a trail that crosses the Cascade Range. In midsummer, the cabin looked strange in the forest. It was only twelve feet square, but it rose fully two stories and then had a high and steeply peaked roof. From the ridge of the roof, moreover, a ten-foot pole stuck straight up. Tied to the top of the pole was a shovel. To hikers shedding their backpacks at the door of the cabin on a cold summer evening—as the five of us did—it was somewhat unnerving to look up and think of people walking around in snow perhaps thirty-five feet above, hunting for that shovel, then digging their way down to the threshold.
In Encounters with the Archdruid (1971), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cabin (4)  |  Cascade (3)  |  Cold (112)  |  Cross (16)  |  Dig (21)  |  Digging (11)  |  Door (93)  |  Down (456)  |  Five (16)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forest (150)  |  Fully (21)  |  Glacier (17)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Look (582)  |  Midsummer (2)  |  Moreover (3)  |  Peak (20)  |  People (1005)  |  Pole (46)  |  Range (99)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Rise (166)  |  Roof (13)  |  Shed (5)  |  Small (477)  |  Snow (37)  |  Square (70)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stick (24)  |  Story (118)  |  Straight (73)  |  Strange (157)  |  Summer (54)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thirty-Five (2)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Tie (38)  |  Top (96)  |  Trail (10)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Yard (7)

Better to take pleasure in a rose than to put its root under a microscope.
In Oscariana: Epigrams (1895), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Root (120)

By firm immutable immortal laws Impress’d on Nature by the GREAT FIRST CAUSE,
Say, MUSE! how rose from elemental strife
Organic forms, and kindled into life;
How Love and Sympathy with potent charm
Warm the cold heart, the lifted hand disarm;
Allure with pleasures, and alarm with pains,
And bind Society in golden chains.
From 'Production of Life', The Temple of Nature; or, The Origin of Society: A Poem, with Philosophical Notes (1803), 3, Canto I, lines 1-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Alarm (18)  |  Allure (4)  |  Bind (25)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chain (50)  |  Charm (51)  |  Cold (112)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Golden (45)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Kindled (2)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Muse (10)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organic (158)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Poem (96)  |  Potent (12)  |  Say (984)  |  Society (326)  |  Strife (9)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Warm (69)

EMBALM, v.t. To cheat vegetation by locking up the gases upon which it feeds. By embalming their dead and thereby deranging the natural balance between animal and vegetable life, the Egyptians made their once fertile and populous country barren and incapable of supporting more than a meagre crew. The modern metallic burial casket is a step in the same direction, and many a dead man who ought now to be ornamenting his neighbor's lawn as a tree, or enriching his table as a bunch of radishes, is doomed to a long inutility. We shall get him after awhile if we are spared, but in the meantime the violet and rose are languishing for a nibble at his glutæus maximus.
The Cynic's Word Book (1906), 90. Also published later as The Devil's Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Balance (77)  |  Barren (30)  |  Cheat (13)  |  Country (251)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doom (32)  |  Embalming (2)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Humour (116)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Step (231)  |  Table (104)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Violet (11)

Essentially all civilizations that rose to the level of possessing an urban culture had need for two forms of science-related technology, namely, mathematics for land measurements and commerce and astronomy for time-keeping in agriculture and aspects of religious rituals.
From The Science Matrix: The Journey, Travails, Triumphs (1992, 1998), Preface, x.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Culture (143)  |  Form (959)  |  Land (115)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Need (290)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Ritual (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Technology (257)  |  Time (1877)  |  Timekeeping (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Urban (10)

Euler was a believer in God, downright and straightforward. The following story is told by Thiebault, in his Souvenirs de vingt ans de séjour à Berlin, … Thiebault says that he has no personal knowledge of the truth of the story, but that it was believed throughout the whole of the north of Europe. Diderot paid a visit to the Russian Court at the invitation of the Empress. He conversed very freely, and gave the younger members of the Court circle a good deal of lively atheism. The Empress was much amused, but some of her counsellors suggested that it might be desirable to check these expositions of doctrine. The Empress did not like to put a direct muzzle on her guest’s tongue, so the following plot was contrived. Diderot was informed that a learned mathematician was in possession of an algebraical demonstration of the existence of God, and would give it him before all the Court, if he desired to hear it. Diderot gladly consented: though the name of the mathematician is not given, it was Euler. He advanced toward Diderot, and said gravely, and in a tone of perfect conviction:
Monsieur, (a + bn) / n = x, donc Dieu existe; repondez!

Diderot, to whom algebra was Hebrew, was embarrassed and disconcerted; while peals of laughter rose on all sides. He asked permission to return to France at once, which was granted.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1878), 251. [The declaration in French expresses, “therefore God exists; please answer!” This Euler-Diderot anecdote, as embellished by De Morgan, is generally regarded as entirely fictional. Diderot before he became an encyclopedist was an accomplished mathematician and fully capable of recognizing—and responding to—the absurdity of an algebraic expression in proving the existence of God. See B.H. Brown, 'The Euler-Diderot Anecdote', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1942), 49, No. 5, 392-303. —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Amused (3)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atheism (9)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Check (24)  |  Circle (110)  |  Consent (14)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Converse (8)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Court (33)  |  Deal (188)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Desire (204)  |  Denis Diderot (6)  |  Direct (225)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Europe (43)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Follow (378)  |  France (27)  |  Freely (13)  |  Gladly (2)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Gravely (2)  |  Guest (5)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hebrew (10)  |  Inform (47)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lively (17)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Member (41)  |  Name (333)  |  North (11)  |  Peal (2)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permission (7)  |  Personal (67)  |  Plot (11)  |  Possession (65)  |  Return (124)  |  Russia (13)  |  Say (984)  |  Side (233)  |  Story (118)  |  Straightforward (10)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Tell (340)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tone (22)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Toward (45)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Visit (26)  |  Whole (738)  |  Young (227)  |  Younger (21)

I died as mineral and became a plant,
I died as plant and rose to animal,
I died as animal and I became man.
Why should I fear? When was I less by dying?
'I Died as a Mineral', in Arthur John Arberry, Classical Persian Literature (1994), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Death (388)  |  Fear (197)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Plant (294)  |  Why (491)

I often get letters … from people who say … I never give credit to the almighty power that created nature. … I reply … “Well, it’s funny that the people, when they say that this is evidence of the Almighty, always quote beautiful things … orchids and hummingbirds and butterflies and roses.” But I always have to think too of a little boy sitting on the banks of a river in west Africa who has a worm boring through his eyeball, turning him blind before he’s five years old. And I … say, “Well, presumably the God you speak about created the worm as well,” and now, I find that baffling to credit a merciful God with that action. And therefore it seems to me safer to show things that I know to be truth, truthful and factual, and allow people to make up their own minds about the moralities of this thing, or indeed the theology of this thing.
From BBC TV, Life on Air (2002).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Africa (35)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Bank (31)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boring (7)  |  Boy (94)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Hummingbird (4)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Orchid (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Quote (42)  |  Reply (56)  |  River (119)  |  Say (984)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Show (346)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Speak (232)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Worm (42)  |  Year (933)

I see trees of green, red roses too,
I see them bloom for me and you,
And I think to myself, what a wonderful world.
Verse of song made popular by Louis Armstrong, written by George Weiss and Bob Thiele
Science quotes on:  |  Bloom (9)  |  Green (63)  |  Horticulture (9)  |  Myself (212)  |  Red (35)  |  Roses (3)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)

If seeds in the black Earth can turn into such beautiful roses what might not the heart of man become in its long journey towards the stars?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Become (815)  |  Black (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Heart (229)  |  Journey (42)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Roses (3)  |  Seed (93)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Turn (447)

In the year of chan yan..., Jupiter was in [the Zodiacal Division of] Zi, it rose in the morning and went under in the evening together with the Lunar Mansions Xunu, Xu and Wei. It was very large and bright. Apparently, there was a small reddish (chi) star appended (fu) to its side. This is called “an alliance” (tong meng).
Gan De
As given in Chinese Astronomy and Astrophysics (1981), 5, 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Alliance (5)  |  Bright (79)  |  Call (769)  |  Chi (2)  |  Division (65)  |  Evening (12)  |  Ganymede (2)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Large (394)  |  Moon (237)  |  Morning (94)  |  Red (35)  |  Rising (44)  |  Side (233)  |  Small (477)  |  Star (427)  |  Together (387)  |  Year (933)

In the year of our Lord 729, two comets appeared around the sun, striking terror into all who saw them. One comet rose early and preceded the sun, while the other followed the setting sun at evening, seeming to portend awful calamity to east and west alike. Or else, since one comet was the precursor of day and the other of night, they indicated that mankind was menaced by evils at both times. They appeared in the month of January, and remained visible for about a fortnight, pointing their fiery torches northward as though to set the welkin aflame. At this time, a swarm of Saracens ravaged Gaul with horrible slaughter; … Both the outset and course of Ceolwulfs reign were filled by so many grave disturbances that it is quite impossible to know what to write about them or what the outcome will be.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII., as translated by Leo Sherley-Price, revised by R.E. Latham, Ecclesiastical History of the English People (1955, 1990), 323. Note: The observation likely was on a single comet seen twice each day. The event is also in both the Laud and Parker manuscripts of The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Awful (8)  |  Both (493)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Comet (54)  |  Course (409)  |  Day (42)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Early (185)  |  Evil (116)  |  Fiery (5)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fortnight (3)  |  Grave (52)  |  Horrible (10)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Menace (5)  |  Month (88)  |  Night (120)  |  Other (2236)  |  Portend (2)  |  Precursor (5)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Reign (23)  |  Remain (349)  |  Saracen (2)  |  Saw (160)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Slaughter (7)  |  Striking (48)  |  Sun (385)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Terror (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torch (12)  |  Two (937)  |  Visible (84)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

October 9, 1863
Always, however great the height of the balloon, when I have seen the horizon it has roughly appeared to be on the level of the car though of course the dip of the horizon is a very appreciable quantity or the same height as the eye. From this one might infer that, could the earth be seen without a cloud or anything to obscure it, and the boundary line of the plane approximately the same height as the eye, the general appearance would be that of a slight concavity; but I have never seen any part of the surface of the earth other than as a plane.
Towns and cities, when viewed from the balloon are like models in motion. I shall always remember the ascent of 9th October, 1863, when we passed over London about sunset. At the time when we were 7,000 feet high, and directly over London Bridge, the scene around was one that cannot probably be equalled in the world. We were still so low as not to have lost sight of the details of the spectacle which presented itself to our eyes; and with one glance the homes of 3,000,000 people could be seen, and so distinct was the view, that every large building was easily distinguishable. In fact, the whole of London was visible, and some parts most clearly. All round, the suburbs were also very distinct, with their lines of detached villas, imbedded as it were in a mass of shrubs; beyond, the country was like a garden, its fields, well marked, becoming smaller and smaller as the eye wandered farther and farther away.
Again looking down, there was the Thames, throughout its whole length, without the slightest mist, dotted over its winding course with innumerable ships and steamboats, like moving toys. Gravesend was visible, also the mouth of the Thames, and the coast around as far as Norfolk. The southern shore of the mouth of the Thames was not so clear, but the sea beyond was seen for many miles; when at a higher elevation, I looked for the coast of France, but was unable to see it. On looking round, the eye was arrested by the garden-like appearance of the county of Kent, till again London claimed yet more careful attention.
Smoke, thin and blue, was curling from it, and slowly moving away in beautiful curves, from all except one part, south of the Thames, where it was less blue and seemed more dense, till the cause became evident; it was mixed with mist rising from the ground, the southern limit of which was bounded by an even line, doubtless indicating the meeting of the subsoils of gravel and clay. The whole scene was surmounted by a canopy of blue, everywhere free from cloud, except near the horizon, where a band of cumulus and stratus extended all round, forming a fitting boundary to such a glorious view.
As seen from the earth, the sunset this evening was described as fine, the air being clear and the shadows well defined; but, as we rose to view it and its effects, the golden hues increased in intensity; their richness decreased as the distance from the sun increased, both right and left; but still as far as 90º from the sun, rose-coloured clouds extended. The remainder of the circle was completed, for the most part, by pure white cumulus of well-rounded and symmetrical forms.
I have seen London by night. I have crossed it during the day at the height of four miles. I have often admired the splendour of sky scenery, but never have I seen anything which surpassed this spectacle. The roar of the town heard at this elevation was a deep, rich, continuous sound the voice of labour. At four miles above London, all was hushed; no sound reached our ears.
Travels in the Air (1871), 99-100.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attention (190)  |  Balloon (15)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Bound (119)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Building (156)  |  Canopy (6)  |  Car (71)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circle (110)  |  Claim (146)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Completed (30)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Country (251)  |  Course (409)  |  Curve (49)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detail (146)  |  Distance (161)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Down (456)  |  Ear (68)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extend (128)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Farther (51)  |  Field (364)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Forming (42)  |  Free (232)  |  Garden (60)  |  General (511)  |  Glance (34)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Golden (45)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Labour (98)  |  Large (394)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Low (80)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mist (14)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  People (1005)  |  Present (619)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remainder (7)  |  Remember (179)  |  Right (452)  |  Rising (44)  |  Scene (36)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Ship (62)  |  Shrub (5)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sky (161)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Sound (183)  |  South (38)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Steamboat (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Suburb (6)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Thames (6)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toy (19)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Wander (35)  |  White (127)  |  Whole (738)  |  Winding (8)  |  World (1774)

Once I dipt into the future far as human eye could see,
And I saw the Chief Forecaster, dead as any one can be-
Dead and damned and shut in Hades as a liar from his birth,
With a record of unreason seldom paralleled on earth.
While I looked he reared him solemnly, that incandescent youth,
From the coals that he’s preferred to the advantages of truth.
He cast his eyes about him and above him; then he wrote
On a slab of thin asbestos what I venture here to quote-
For I read it in the rose-light of the everlasting glow:
Cloudy; variable winds, with local showers; cooler; snow.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Asbestos (3)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cast (66)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Coal (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eye (419)  |  Future (429)  |  Hades (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Incandescent (5)  |  Liar (6)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Quote (42)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Shower (6)  |  Shut (41)  |  Snow (37)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Variable (34)  |  Wind (128)  |  Youth (101)

One day when the whole family had gone to a circus to see some extraordinary performing apes, I remained alone with my microscope, observing the life in the mobile cells of a transparent star-fish larva, when a new thought suddenly flashed across my brain. It struck me that similar cells might serve in the defence of the organism against intruders. Feeling that there was in this something of surpassing interest, I felt so excited that I began striding up and down the room and even went to the seashore in order to collect my thoughts.
I said to myself that, if my supposition was true, a splinter introduced into the body of a star-fish larva, devoid of blood-vessels or of a nervous system, should soon be surrounded by mobile cells as is to be observed in a man who runs a splinter into his finger. This was no sooner said than done.
There was a small garden to our dwelling, in which we had a few days previously organised a 'Christmas tree' for the children on a little tangerine tree; I fetched from it a few rose thorns and introduced them at once under the skin of some beautiful star-fish larvae as transparent as water.
I was too excited to sleep that night in the expectation of the result of my experiment, and very early the next morning I ascertained that it had fully succeeded.
That experiment formed the basis of the phagocyte theory, to the development of which I devoted the next twenty-five years of my life.
In Olga Metchnikoff, Life of Elie Metchnikoff 1845-1916 (1921), 116-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Alone (311)  |  Ape (53)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cell (138)  |  Children (200)  |  Christmas (11)  |  Circus (3)  |  Defence (14)  |  Development (422)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Family (94)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fish (120)  |  Flash (49)  |  Form (959)  |  Garden (60)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Larva (4)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Morning (94)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Phagocyte (2)  |  Remain (349)  |  Result (677)  |  Run (174)  |  Seashore (6)  |  See (1081)  |  Skin (47)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Star (427)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud.
Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun,
And loathsome canker lives in sweetest bud.
All men make faults, and even I in this.
Sonnet 35.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Both (493)  |  Bud (6)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Fault (54)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Live (628)  |  Loathsome (3)  |  Moon (237)  |  Mud (26)  |  Silver (46)  |  Stain (9)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thorn (5)

So erst the Sage [Pythagoras] with scientific truth
In Grecian temples taught the attentive youth;
With ceaseless change how restless atoms pass
From life to life, a transmigrating mass;
How the same organs, which to-day compose
The poisonous henbane, or the fragrant rose,
May with to-morrow's sun new forms compile,
Frown in the Hero, in the Beauty smile.
Whence drew the enlighten'd Sage the moral plan,
That man should ever be the friend of man;
Should eye with tenderness all living forms,
His brother-emmets, and his sister-worms.
The Temple of Nature (1803), canto 4, lines 417-28, page 163.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Brother (43)  |  Change (593)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Friend (168)  |  Hero (42)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Moral (195)  |  New (1216)  |  Organ (115)  |  Pass (238)  |  Plan (117)  |  Poem (96)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Sage (23)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sun (385)  |  Temple (42)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Worm (42)  |  Youth (101)

Somewhere in the arrangement of this world there seems to be a great concern about giving us delight, which shows that, in the universe, over and above the meaning of matter and forces, there is a message conveyed through the magic touch of personality. ...
Is it merely because the rose is round and pink that it gives me more satisfaction than the gold which could buy me the necessities of life, or any number of slaves. ... Somehow we feel that through a rose the language of love reached our hearts.
The Religion of Man (1931), 102. Quoted in H. E. Hunter, The Divine Proportion (1970), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Concern (228)  |  Delight (108)  |  Feel (367)  |  Force (487)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Magic (86)  |  Matter (798)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Merely (316)  |  Message (49)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Number (699)  |  Personality (62)  |  Pink (4)  |  Reach (281)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Show (346)  |  Slave (37)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Through (849)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universe (857)  |  World (1774)

Take the rose—most people think it very beautiful: I don’t care for It at all. I prefer the cactus, for the simple reason that it has a more interesting personality. It has wonderfully adapted itself to its surroundings! It is the best illustration of the theory of evolution in plant life.
From George MacAdam, 'Steinmetz, Electricity's Mastermind, Enters Politics', New York Times (2 Nov 1913), SM3.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Best (459)  |  Cactus (3)  |  Care (186)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Life (1795)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Personality (62)  |  Plant (294)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Reason (744)  |  Simple (406)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wonderfully (2)

That mathematics “do not cultivate the power of generalization,”; … will be admitted by no person of competent knowledge, except in a very qualified sense. The generalizations of mathematics, are, no doubt, a different thing from the generalizations of physical science; but in the difficulty of seizing them, and the mental tension they require, they are no contemptible preparation for the most arduous efforts of the scientific mind. Even the fundamental notions of the higher mathematics, from those of the differential calculus upwards are products of a very high abstraction. … To perceive the mathematical laws common to the results of many mathematical operations, even in so simple a case as that of the binomial theorem, involves a vigorous exercise of the same faculty which gave us Kepler’s laws, and rose through those laws to the theory of universal gravitation. Every process of what has been called Universal Geometry—the great creation of Descartes and his successors, in which a single train of reasoning solves whole classes of problems at once, and others common to large groups of them—is a practical lesson in the management of wide generalizations, and abstraction of the points of agreement from those of difference among objects of great and confusing diversity, to which the purely inductive sciences cannot furnish many superior. Even so elementary an operation as that of abstracting from the particular configuration of the triangles or other figures, and the relative situation of the particular lines or points, in the diagram which aids the apprehension of a common geometrical demonstration, is a very useful, and far from being always an easy, exercise of the faculty of generalization so strangely imagined to have no place or part in the processes of mathematics.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 612-13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Admit (45)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Aid (97)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Binomial (6)  |  Binomial Theorem (5)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Competent (20)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Creation (327)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Group (78)  |  High (362)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Involve (90)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Line (91)  |  Management (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Place (177)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Purely (109)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Relative (39)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Seize (15)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Situation (113)  |  Solve (130)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Successor (14)  |  Superior (81)  |  Tension (24)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Universal (189)  |  Upward (43)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Useful (250)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

The Atomic Age began at exactly 5.30 Mountain War Time on the morning of July 15, 1945, on a stretch of semi-desert land about 50 airline miles from Alamogordo, New Mexico. And just at that instance there rose from the bowels of the earth a light not of this world, the light of many suns in one. ... At first it was a giant column that soon took the shape of a supramundane mushroom.
On the first atomic explosion in New Mexico, 16 Jul 1945.
From 'Drama of the Atomic Bomb Found Climax in July 16 Test', in New York Times (26 Sep 1945), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Atomic Age (6)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Bowel (16)  |  Desert (56)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explosion (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Giant (67)  |  Light (607)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mountain (185)  |  New (1216)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  War (225)  |  World (1774)

The growth of a large business is merely a survival of the fittest. … The American Beauty rose can be produced in the splendor and fragrance which bring cheer to its beholder only by sacrificing the early buds which grow up around it. This is not an evil tendency in business. It is merely the working-out of a law of nature and a law of God.
From address to the Brown University YMCA, as quoted in 'Young Rockefeller: Defending Trusts, Uses American Beauty Similitude,' Cincinnati Enquirer (9 Feb 1902), 4, citing the New York Journal.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Business (149)  |  Darwinism (3)  |  Early (185)  |  Evil (116)  |  God (757)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Merely (316)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Produced (187)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Tendency (99)

Therefore the moon, the governess of floods,
Pale in her anger washes all the air,
That rheumatic diseases do abound;
And through this distemperature we see
The seasons alter: hoary-headed frosts
Fall in the fresh lap of the crimson rose.
A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595-6), II, i.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Anger (20)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distemper (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fall (230)  |  Flood (50)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Frost (14)  |  Lap (9)  |  Moon (237)  |  Rheumatism (3)  |  Season (47)  |  See (1081)  |  Through (849)

Two kinds of symbol must surely be distinguished. The algebraic symbol comes naked into the world of mathematics and is clothed with value by its masters. A poetic symbol—like the Rose, for Love, in Guillaume de Lorris—comes trailing clouds of glory from the real world, clouds whose shape and colour largely determine and explain its poetic use. In an equation, x and y will do as well as a and b; but the Romance of the Rose could not, without loss, be re-written as the Romance of the Onion, and if a man did not see why, we could only send him back to the real world to study roses, onions, and love, all of them still untouched by poetry, still raw.
C.S. Lewis and E.M. Tillyard, The Personal Heresy: A Controversy (1936), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Determine (144)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Do (1908)  |  Equation (132)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Glory (58)  |  Kind (557)  |  Loss (110)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naked (10)  |  Onion (9)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Raw (28)  |  Rewriting (2)  |  Romance (15)  |  See (1081)  |  Shape (72)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Surely (101)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Two (937)  |  Untouched (4)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

We all agree now - by “we” I mean intelligent people under sixty - that a work of art is like a rose. A rose is not beautiful because it is like something else. Neither is a work of art. Roses and works of art are beautiful in themselves.
In Since Cezanne (1922), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Mean (809)  |  People (1005)  |  Rise (166)  |  Roses (3)  |  Sixty (6)  |  Something (719)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Work (1351)

We do live in a conceptual trough that encourages such yearning for unknown and romanticized greener pastures of other times. The future doesn’t seem promising, if only because we can extrapolate some disquieting present trends in to further deterioration: pollution, nationalism, environmental destruction, and aluminum bats. Therefore, we tend to take refuge in a rose-colored past ... I do not doubt the salutary, even the essential, properties of this curiously adaptive human trait, but we must also record the down side. Legends of past golden ages become impediments when we try to negotiate our current dilemma.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptive (3)  |  Age (499)  |  Aluminum (6)  |  Bat (10)  |  Become (815)  |  Color (137)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Current (118)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Dilemma (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Down (456)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Environment (216)  |  Essential (199)  |  Extrapolate (2)  |  Far (154)  |  Future (429)  |  Golden (45)  |  Golden Age (10)  |  Green (63)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impediment (11)  |  Legend (17)  |  Live (628)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nationalism (6)  |  Negotiate (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Property (168)  |  Record (154)  |  Refuge (15)  |  Romanticize (2)  |  Salutary (5)  |  Seem (145)  |  Side (233)  |  Tend (124)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trait (22)  |  Trend (22)  |  Try (283)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

[In the beginning, before creation] There was neither Aught nor Naught, no air nor sky beyond. …
[There was only]
A self-supporting mass beneath, and energy above.
Who knows, who ever told, from whence this vast creation rose?
No gods had yet been born—who then can e’er the truth disclose?
Rigveda
In Rigveda. In John Robson, Hinduism and Its Relations to Christianity (1893), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Aught (6)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Creation (327)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Energy (344)  |  God (757)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mass (157)  |  Myth (56)  |  Naught (10)  |  Self (267)  |  Sky (161)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)

“Wu Li” was more than poetic. It was the best definition of physics that the conference would produce. It caught that certain something, that living quality that we were seeking to express in a book, that thing without which physics becomes sterile. “Wu” can mean either “matter” or “energy.” “Li” is a richly poetic word. It means “universal order” or “universal law.” It also means “organic patterns.” The grain in a panel of wood is Li. The organic pattern on the surface of a leaf is also Li, and so is the texture of a rose petal. In short, Wu Li, the Chinese word for physics, means “patterns of organic energy” (“matter/ energy” [Wu] + “universal order/organic patterns” [Li]). This is remarkable since it reflects a world view which the founders of western science (Galileo and Newton) simply did not comprehend, but toward which virtually every physical theory of import in the twentieth century is pointing!
In The Dancing Wu Li Masters: An Overview of the New Physics (1979), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Book (392)  |  Catch (31)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Conference (17)  |  Definition (221)  |  Energy (344)  |  Express (186)  |  Founder (26)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Grain (50)  |  Law (894)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Order (632)  |  Organic (158)  |  Panel (2)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Petal (4)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Poem (96)  |  Produce (104)  |  Quality (135)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Short (197)  |  Something (719)  |  Sterile (21)  |  Surface (209)  |  Texture (7)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universal (189)  |  View (488)  |  Western (45)  |  Wood (92)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)  |  World View (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.