Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Attentive

Attentive Quotes (5 quotes)

Imperceptibly a change had been wrought in me until I no longer felt alone in a strange, silent country. I had learned to hear the echoes of a time when every living thing upon this land and even the varied overshadowing skies had its voice, a voice that was attentively heard and devoutly heeded by the ancient people of America. Henceforth, to me the plants, the trees, the clouds and all things had become vocal with human hopes, fears and supplications.
From Preface, Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs (1915), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (106)  |  America (87)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Change (364)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Country (147)  |  Devout (5)  |  Echo (9)  |  Fear (142)  |  Hear (63)  |  Heed (8)  |  Hope (174)  |  Human (550)  |  Imperceptible (8)  |  Land (115)  |  Learn (288)  |  People (390)  |  Plant (200)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Silent (28)  |  Sky (124)  |  Strange (94)  |  Time (595)  |  Tree (171)  |  Vocal (2)  |  Voice (51)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  Alone (106)  |  Amount (31)  |  Ask (160)  |  Bear (67)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (126)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (98)  |  Comprehend (39)  |  Conceive (39)  |  Conception (92)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Continuous (38)  |  Declare (27)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (69)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (33)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Draw (55)  |  Error (277)  |  Evident (29)  |  Extravagant (4)  |  Eye (222)  |  Fear (142)  |  Fellow (37)  |  First (314)  |  Follow (124)  |  Former (25)  |  Glance (20)  |  Great (534)  |  Hold (94)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Immediately (23)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (20)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Join (25)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Know (556)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (347)  |  Link (42)  |  Long (174)  |  Mark (42)  |  Mean (101)  |  Means (176)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mode (40)  |  Movement (83)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Primary (41)  |  Principle (292)  |  Process (267)  |  Progress (368)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reason (471)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (95)  |  Remain (113)  |  Remote (42)  |  Rise (70)  |  Run (57)  |  Same (156)  |  Say (228)  |  Second (59)  |  Sense (321)  |  Simple (178)  |  Sound (90)  |  Spring (71)  |  Step (110)  |  Succession (45)  |  Testimony (13)  |  Therefrom (2)  |  Thought (546)  |  True (208)  |  Understand (340)  |  Uninterrupted (3)  |  Vary (26)  |  View (171)  |  Whereby (2)

Mathematics make the mind attentive to the objects which it considers. This they do by entertaining it with a great variety of truths, which are delightful and evident, but not obvious. Truth is the same thing to the understanding as music to the ear and beauty to the eye. The pursuit of it does really as much gratify a natural faculty implanted in us by our wise Creator as the pleasing of our senses: only in the former case, as the object and faculty are more spiritual, the delight is more pure, free from regret, turpitude, lassitude, and intemperance that commonly attend sensual pleasures.
In An Essay on the Usefulness of Mathematical Learning (1701), 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (248)  |  Consider (81)  |  Creator (55)  |  Delight (66)  |  Delightful (9)  |  Ear (29)  |  Evident (29)  |  Eye (222)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Free (92)  |  Gratify (3)  |  Implant (4)  |  Intemperance (3)  |  Lassitude (2)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mind (760)  |  Music (106)  |  Natural (173)  |  Object (175)  |  Obvious (83)  |  Please (24)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Pure (103)  |  Pursuit (79)  |  Regret (21)  |  Sense (321)  |  Sensual (2)  |  Spiritual (57)  |  Truth (928)  |  Turpitude (2)  |  Understand (340)  |  Variety (71)

The general knowledge of our author [Leonhard Euler] was more extensive than could well be expected, in one who had pursued, with such unremitting ardor, mathematics and astronomy as his favorite studies. He had made a very considerable progress in medical, botanical, and chemical science. What was still more extraordinary, he was an excellent scholar, and possessed in a high degree what is generally called erudition. He had attentively read the most eminent writers of ancient Rome; the civil and literary history of all ages and all nations was familiar to him; and foreigners, who were only acquainted with his works, were astonished to find in the conversation of a man, whose long life seemed solely occupied in mathematical and physical researches and discoveries, such an extensive acquaintance with the most interesting branches of literature. In this respect, no doubt, he was much indebted to an uncommon memory, which seemed to retain every idea that was conveyed to it, either from reading or from meditation.
In Philosophical and Mathematical Dictionary (1815), 493-494.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Acquaintance (23)  |  Ardor (5)  |  Astonish (7)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Author (62)  |  Botany (51)  |  Branch (107)  |  Call (128)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Civil (6)  |  Considerable (20)  |  Conversation (26)  |  Convey (16)  |  Degree (82)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Erudition (6)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Extensive (18)  |  Extraordinary (43)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Favorite (24)  |  Foreigner (3)  |  General (160)  |  Generally (15)  |  High (153)  |  History (369)  |  Idea (580)  |  Indebted (7)  |  Interest (237)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Life (1131)  |  Literary (12)  |  Literature (79)  |  Long (174)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Meditation (12)  |  Memory (106)  |  Nation (134)  |  Physical (134)  |  Possess (56)  |  Progress (368)  |  Read (145)  |  Research (590)  |  Respect (86)  |  Retain (19)  |  Scholar (38)  |  Science (2067)  |  Study (476)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Work (635)  |  Writer (46)

Weierstrass related … that he followed Sylvester’s papers on the theory of algebraic forms very attentively until Sylvester began to employ Hebrew characters. That was more than he could stand and after that he quit him.
From Naturwissenschaftliche Rundschau (1897), 12 (1897), 361. As cited in Robert Ιdouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (104)  |  Character (118)  |  Hebrew (7)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Paper (83)  |  Quit (10)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Theory (696)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.