Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index L > Category: Lively

Lively Quotes (17 quotes)

“Le génie n'est qu'une longue patience”, a dit Buffon. Cela est bien incomplet. Le génie, c'est l'impatience dans les idées et la patience dans les faits : une imagination vive et un jugement calme; quelque chose comme un liquide en ébullition dans un vase qui reste toujours froid.
“Genius is just enduring patience,” said Buffon. This is far from complete. Genius is impatience in ideas and patience with the facts: a lively imagination and a calm judgment, rather like a liquid boiling in a cup that remains cold.
In Recueil d'Œuvres de Léo Errera: Botanique Générale (1908), 198. Google translation by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Aphorism (21)  |  Boiling (3)  |  Buffon_Georges (2)  |  Calm (31)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cup (7)  |  Enduring (6)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Genius (284)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Like (22)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Patience (56)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Vivid (23)

Ardent desire for knowledge, in fact, is the one motive attracting and supporting investigators in their efforts; and just this knowledge, really grasped and yet always flying before them, becomes at once their sole torment and their sole happiness. Those who do not know the torment of the unknown cannot have the joy of discovery which is certainly the liveliest that the mind of man can ever feel.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 221-222.
Science quotes on:  |  Ardent (6)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Flying (72)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Sole (49)  |  Support (147)  |  Torment (18)  |  Unknown (182)

At first sight nothing seems more obvious than that everything has a beginning and an end, and that everything can be subdivided into smaller parts. Nevertheless, for entirely speculative reasons the philosophers of Antiquity, especially the Stoics, concluded this concept to be quite unnecessary. The prodigious development of physics has now reached the same conclusion as those philosophers, Empedocles and Democritus in particular, who lived around 500 B.C. and for whom even ancient man had a lively admiration.
'Development of the Theory of Electrolytic Dissociation', Nobel Lecture, 11 December 1903. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1901-1921 (1966), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Development (422)  |  Empedocles (10)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  First (1283)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sight (132)  |  Unnecessary (23)

Euler was a believer in God, downright and straightforward. The following story is told by Thiebault, in his Souvenirs de vingt ans de séjour à Berlin, … Thiebault says that he has no personal knowledge of the truth of the story, but that it was believed throughout the whole of the north of Europe. Diderot paid a visit to the Russian Court at the invitation of the Empress. He conversed very freely, and gave the younger members of the Court circle a good deal of lively atheism. The Empress was much amused, but some of her counsellors suggested that it might be desirable to check these expositions of doctrine. The Empress did not like to put a direct muzzle on her guest’s tongue, so the following plot was contrived. Diderot was informed that a learned mathematician was in possession of an algebraical demonstration of the existence of God, and would give it him before all the Court, if he desired to hear it. Diderot gladly consented: though the name of the mathematician is not given, it was Euler. He advanced toward Diderot, and said gravely, and in a tone of perfect conviction:
Monsieur, (a + bn) / n = x, donc Dieu existe; repondez!

Diderot, to whom algebra was Hebrew, was embarrassed and disconcerted; while peals of laughter rose on all sides. He asked permission to return to France at once, which was granted.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1878), 251. [The declaration in French expresses, “therefore God exists; please answer!” This Euler-Diderot anecdote, as embellished by De Morgan, is generally regarded as entirely fictional. Diderot before he became an encyclopedist was an accomplished mathematician and fully capable of recognizing—and responding to—the absurdity of an algebraic expression in proving the existence of God. See B.H. Brown, 'The Euler-Diderot Anecdote', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1942), 49, No. 5, 392-303. —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Amused (3)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atheism (9)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Check (24)  |  Circle (110)  |  Consent (14)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Converse (8)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Court (33)  |  Deal (188)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Desire (204)  |  Denis Diderot (6)  |  Direct (225)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Europe (43)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Follow (378)  |  France (27)  |  Freely (13)  |  Gladly (2)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Gravely (2)  |  Guest (5)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hebrew (10)  |  Inform (47)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Member (41)  |  Name (333)  |  North (11)  |  Peal (2)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permission (7)  |  Personal (67)  |  Plot (11)  |  Possession (65)  |  Return (124)  |  Rose (34)  |  Russia (13)  |  Say (984)  |  Side (233)  |  Story (118)  |  Straightforward (10)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Tell (340)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tone (22)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Toward (45)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Visit (26)  |  Whole (738)  |  Young (227)  |  Younger (21)

Gay-Lussac was quick, lively, ingenious and profound, with great activity of mind and great facility of manipulation. I should place him at the head of all the living chemists in France.
In Mary Elvira Weeks, Discovery of the Elements (1934), 161, citing J. Davy, Memoirs of the Life of Sir Humphry Davy, Bart. (1836) Vol. 1, 469.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Facility (11)  |  France (27)  |  Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Head (81)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Living (491)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Place (177)  |  Profound (104)  |  Quick (13)

I find that by confining a workman to one particular limb of the pistol until he has made two thousand, I save at least one quarter of his labor, to what I should provided I finishd them by small quantities; and the work will be as much better as it is quicker made. ... I have some seventeen thousand screws & other parts of pistols now forgd. & many parts nearly finished & the business is going on brisk and lively.
Describing subdivision of labour and standardization of parts.
Letter to the Secretary of the Navy (1808), in S.N.D. and R.H. North, Memoir of Simeon North (1913), 64. Quoted in Joseph Wickham Roe, English and American Tool Builders (1916), 134.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Business (149)  |  Find (998)  |  Finish (59)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Other (2236)  |  Save (118)  |  Screw (17)  |  Small (477)  |  Standardization (3)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

I have the vagary of taking a lively interest in mathematical subjects only where I may anticipate ingenious association of ideas and results recommending themselves by elegance or generality.
Letter to Heinrich Schumacher (17 Sep 1808). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Association (46)  |  Biography (240)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Generality (45)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Interest (386)  |  Result (677)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)

If I have sometimes disturbed our academies by somewhat livelier discussions, it is because I was passionately defending truth.
In Speech (27 Dec 1892) at the Golden Jubilee celebration for Pasteur's 70th birthday. As translated in Nature (1893), 47, 205. Note: Indeed, Pasteur had argued long and hard to convince his colleagues about his Germ Theory.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Defending (2)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Truth (1057)

Inspiration is the inclination of the spirit to the most lively reception of impressions and to the grasping and exposition of ideas.
(1827). In Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin, John Bayley (ed.), Pushkin on Literature (1986), 211.
Science quotes on:  |  Exposition (15)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Most (1731)  |  Reception (15)  |  Spirit (265)

It is not enough to teach man a specialty. Through it he may become a kind of useful machine, but not a harmoniously developed personality. It is essential that the student acquire an understanding of and a lively feeling for values. He must acquire a vivid sense of the beautiful and of the morally good. Otherwise he—with his specialized knowledge—more closely resembles a well-trained dog than a harmoniously developed person.
From interview with Benjamin Fine, 'Einstein Stresses Critical Thinking', New York Times (5 Oct 1952), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Become (815)  |  Develop (268)  |  Developed (11)  |  Dog (70)  |  Enough (340)  |  Essential (199)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Good (889)  |  Harmonious (18)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Person (363)  |  Personality (62)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Sense (770)  |  Specialized (8)  |  Specialty (12)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Useful (250)  |  Value (365)  |  Vivid (23)

Lecturing after a fashion is easy enough ; teaching is a very different affair. ... The transmission of ideas from one mind to another, in a simple unequivocal form, is not always easy ; but in teaching, the object is not merely to convey the idea, but to give a lively and lasting impression; something that should not merely cause the retention of the image, but in such connection as to excite another process, ' thought.'
Memoirs of John Abernethy (1854), 253.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Connection (162)  |  Different (577)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Form (959)  |  Idea (843)  |  Image (96)  |  Impression (114)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Process (423)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transmission (34)

Mr Humphry Davy is a lively and talented man, and a thorough chemist; but if I might venture to give an opinion... he is rather too lively to fill the Chair of the Royal Society with that degree of gravity it is most becoming to assume.
Sir Joseph Banks, President of the Royal Society. Quoted in John Barrow, Sketches of the Royal Society (1849), 52.
Royal Society;Davy_Humphry
Science quotes on:  |  Bank (31)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Chair (24)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Degree (276)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Opinion (281)  |  President (31)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Society (326)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thorough (40)

Nature when more shy in one, hath more freely confest and shewn herself in another; and a Fly sometimes hath given greater light towards the true knowledge of the structure and the uses of the Parts in Humane Bodies, than an often repeated dissection of the same might have done … We must not therefore think the meanest of the Creation vile or useless, since that in them in lively Characters (if we can but read) we may find the knowledge of a Deity and ourselves … In every Animal there is a world of wonders; each is a Microcosme or a world in it self.
Phocrena, or the Anatomy of a Porpess, dissected at Gresham College: With a Prreliminary Discourse Concerning Anatomy, and a Natural History of Animals (1680), 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Body (537)  |  Character (243)  |  Creation (327)  |  Deity (22)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Find (998)  |  Fly (146)  |  Greater (288)  |  Humane (18)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Light (607)  |  Microcosm (8)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Read (287)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Self (267)  |  Structure (344)  |  Think (1086)  |  Use (766)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

People have wracked their brains for an explanation of benzene and how the celebrated man [Kekulé] managed to come up with the concept of the benzene theory. With regard to the last point especially, a friend of mine who is a farmer and has a lively interest in chemistry has asked me a question which I would like to share with you. My “agricultural friend” apparently believes he has traced the origins of the benzene theory. “Has Kekulé,” so ran the question, “once been a bee-keeper? You certainly know that bees too build hexagons; they know well that they can store the greatest amount of honey that way with the least amount of wax. I always liked it,” my agricultural friend went on, “When I received a new issue of the Berichte; admittedly, I don't read the articles, but I like the pictures very much. The patterns of benzene, naphthalene and especially anthracene are indeed wonderful. When I look at the pictures I always have to think of the honeycombs of my bee hives.”
A. W. Hofmann, after-dinner speech at Kekulé Benzolfest (Mar 1890). Trans. in W. H. Brock, O. Theodor Benfrey and Susanne Stark, 'Hofmann's Benzene Tree at the Kekulé Festivities', Journal of Chemical Education (1991), 68, 888.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bee (40)  |  Benzene (7)  |  Brain (270)  |  Build (204)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Concept (221)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Farmer (32)  |  Friend (168)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hexagon (4)  |  Honey (15)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interest (386)  |  August Kekulé (13)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mine (76)  |  New (1216)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pattern (110)  |  People (1005)  |  Picture (143)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Read (287)  |  Regard (305)  |  Share (75)  |  Store (48)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wax (13)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonderful (149)

That the great majority of those who leave school should have some idea of the kind of evidence required to substantiate given types of belief does not seem unreasonable. Nor is it absurd to expect that they should go forth with a lively interest in the ways in which knowledge is improved and a marked distaste for all conclusions reached in disharmony with the methods of scientific inquiry.
Address to Section L, Education, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at Boston (1909), 'Science as Subject-Matter and as Method'. Published in Science (28 Jan 1910), N.S. Vol. 31, No. 787, 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Distaste (3)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Expect (200)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improve (58)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Majority (66)  |  Marked (55)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Reach (281)  |  Required (108)  |  School (219)  |  Science Education (15)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Substantiate (4)  |  Type (167)  |  Way (1217)

There are many points in the history of an invention which the inventor himself is apt to overlook as trifling, but in which posterity never fail to take a deep interest. The progress of the human mind is never traced with such a lively interest as through the steps by which it perfects a great invention; and there is certainly no invention respecting which this minute information will be more eagerly sought after, than in the case of the steam-engine.
Quoted in The Origin and Progress of the Mechanical Inventions of James Watt (1854), Vol.1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Deep (233)  |  Engine (98)  |  Fail (185)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Information (166)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Point (580)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Progress (465)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Step (231)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)

To Monsieur Lavoisier by appointment. Madame Lavoisier, a lively, sensible, scientific lady, had prepared a dejuné Anglois of tea and coffee, but her conversation on Mr. Kirwan’s Essay on Phlogiston, which she is translating from the English, and on other subjects, which a woman of understanding, that works with her husband in his laboratory, knows how to adorn, was the best repast.
Entry for 16 Oct 1787. In Arthur Young, Travels in France During the Years, 1787, 1788 and 1789 (1792), 64.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appointment (12)  |  Best (459)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Essay (27)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phlogiston (9)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tea (12)  |  Translation (21)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Woman (151)  |  Work (1351)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.