Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Beam

Beam Quotes (24 quotes)

1106. … In the first week of Lent, on the Friday, 16 February, a strange star appeared in the evening, and for a long time afterwards was seen shining for a while each evening. The star made its appearance in the south-west, and seemed to be small and dark, but the light that shone from it was very bright, and appeared like an enormous beam of light shining north-east; and one evening it seemed as if the beam were flashing in the opposite direction towards the star. Some said that they had seen other unknown stars about this time, but we cannot speak about these without reservation, because we did not ourselves see them.
In George Norman Garmonsway (ed., trans.), 'The Parker Chronicle', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1953), 240. This translation from the original Saxon, is a modern printing of an ancient anthology known as The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Manuscript copies were held at various English monasteries. These copies of the Chronicle include content first recorded in the late 9th century. This quote comes from the copy known as the Peterborough Chronicle (a.k.a. Laud manuscript).
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Bright (79)  |  Comet (54)  |  Dark (140)  |  Direction (175)  |  Enormous (41)  |  First (1283)  |  Flash (49)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  See (1081)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Small (477)  |  South (38)  |  Speak (232)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Strange (157)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Week (70)

Question: Account for the delicate shades of colour sometimes seen on the inside of an oyster shell. State and explain the appearance presented when a beam of light falls upon a sheet of glass on which very fine equi-distant parallel lines have been scratched very close to one another.
Answer: The delicate shades are due to putrefaction; the colours always show best when the oyster has been a bad one. Hence they are considered a defect and are called chromatic aberration.
The scratches on the glass will arrange themselves in rings round the light, as any one may see at night in a tram car.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 182, Question 27. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Aberration (8)  |  Account (192)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Bad (180)  |  Best (459)  |  Call (769)  |  Car (71)  |  Chromatic (4)  |  Closeness (4)  |  Color (137)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Defect (31)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Diffraction (5)  |  Due (141)  |  Examination (98)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fine (33)  |  Glass (92)  |  Howler (15)  |  Inside (26)  |  Light (607)  |  Line (91)  |  Night (120)  |  Oyster (11)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Present (619)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Question (621)  |  Ring (16)  |  Scratch (13)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Shade (31)  |  Sheet (7)  |  Shell (63)  |  Show (346)  |  State (491)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tram (3)  |  Will (2355)

But to proceed; as in order and place, so also in matter of her Creation, Woman far excells Man. things receive their value from the matter they are made of, and the excellent skill of their maker: Pots of common clay must not contend with China-dishes, nor pewter utensils vye dignity with those of silver…. Woman was not composed of any inanimate or vile dirt, but of a more refined and purified substance, enlivened and actuated by a Rational Soul, whose operations speak it a beam, or bright ray of Divinity.
In Female Pre-eminence: Or, The Dignity and Excellency of that Sex above the Male, translation (1670).
Science quotes on:  |  Bright (79)  |  China (23)  |  Clay (9)  |  Common (436)  |  Creation (327)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Excel (4)  |  Maker (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Rational (90)  |  Ray (114)  |  Receive (114)  |  Silver (46)  |  Skill (109)  |  Soul (226)  |  Speak (232)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Utensil (2)  |  Value (365)  |  Woman (151)

For the most part, Western medicine doctors are not healers, preventers, listeners, or educators. But they're damned good at saving a life and the other aspects kick the beam. It's about time we brought some balance back to the scale.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Back (390)  |  Balance (77)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Educator (5)  |  Good (889)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listener (7)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physician (273)  |  Scale (121)  |  Time (1877)  |  Western (45)

Form may be of more account than substance. A lens of ice will focus a solar beam to a blaze.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Focus (35)  |  Form (959)  |  Ice (54)  |  Lens (14)  |  More (2559)  |  Solar (8)  |  Substance (248)  |  Will (2355)

Houses were knocked down... enormous heaps of earth and clay thrown up; buildings that were undermined and shaking, propped up by great beams of wood... The yet unfinished and unopened Railway was in progress.
In Dealings with the Firm of Dombey and Son: Wholesale, Retail, and for Exportation (1847), Vol. 1, 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Building (156)  |  Clay (9)  |  Demolition (4)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heap (14)  |  House (140)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prop (6)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Railway (18)  |  Shake (41)  |  Undetermined (3)  |  Unfinished (4)  |  Unopened (3)  |  Wood (92)

I came into the room, which was half dark, and presently spotted Lord Kelvin in the audience and realised that I was in for trouble at the last part of my speech dealing with the age of the earth, where my views conflicted with his. To my relief, Kelvin fell fast asleep, but as I came to the important point, I saw the old bird sit up, open an eye and cock a baleful glance at me! Then a sudden inspiration came, and I said Lord Kelvin had limited the age of the earth, provided no new source (of energy) was discovered. That prophetic utterance refers to what we are now considering tonight, radium! Behold! the old boy beamed upon me.
Speech at the Royal Institution (1904). Quoted in Arthur S. Eve, Rutherford (1939), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Age Of The Earth (12)  |  Audience (26)  |  Bird (149)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cock (6)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Dark (140)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  Energy (344)  |  Eye (419)  |  Glance (34)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Last (426)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Lord (93)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Open (274)  |  Point (580)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Radium (25)  |  Relief (30)  |  Saw (160)  |  Speech (61)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Tonight (9)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Utterance (10)  |  View (488)

I knew, however, that it would cost ten times what I had available in order to build a molecular beam machine. I decided to follow a byway, rather than the highway. It is a procedure I have subsequently recommended to beginning scientists in this country, where research strategy is best modelled on that used by Wolfe at the Plains of Abraham.
(British General James Wolfe defeated the French defending Quebec in 1759 after scaling a cliff for a surprise attack.)
'A Scientist and the World He Lives In', Speech to the Empire Club of Canada (27 Nov 1986) in C. Frank Turner and Tim Dickson (eds.), The Empire Club of Canada Speeches 1986-1987 (1987), 149-161.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (84)  |  Available (78)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Best (459)  |  British (41)  |  Build (204)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Cost (86)  |  Country (251)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Machine (257)  |  Order (632)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Time (1877)

I will not now discuss the Controversie betwixt some of the Modern Atomists, and the Cartesians; the former of whom think, that betwixt the Earth and the Stars, and betwixt these themselves there are vast Tracts of Space that are empty, save where the beams of Light do pass through them; and the later of whom tell us, that the Intervals betwixt the Stars and Planets (among which the Earth may perhaps be reckon'd) are perfectly fill'd, but by a Matter far subtiler than our Air, which some call Celestial, and others Ζther. I shall not, I say, engage in this controversie, but thus much seems evident, That If there be such a Celestial Matter, it must ' make up far the Greatest part of the Universe known to us. For the Interstellar part of the world (If I may so stile it) bears so very great a proportion to the Globes, and their Atmospheres too, (If other Stars have any as well as the Earth,) that It Is almost incomparably Greater in respect of them, than all our Atmosphere is in respect of the Clouds, not to make the comparison between the Sea and the Fishes that swim in it.
A Continuation of New Experiments Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring and Weight of the Air, and their Effects (1669), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Bear (159)  |  Call (769)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Dark Matter (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Empty (80)  |  Engage (39)  |  Ether (35)  |  Evident (91)  |  Former (137)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Interstellar (8)  |  Known (454)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Planet (356)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Respect (207)  |  Save (118)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Swim (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Mock on, mock on, Voltaire, Rousseau!
Mock on, mock on: 'Tis all in vain!
You throw the sand against the wind,
And the wind blows it back again.
And every sand becomes a gem
Reflected in the beams divine;
Blown back they blind the mocking eye,
But still in Israel's paths they shine.
The atoms of Democritus
And Newton's particles of light
Are sands upon the Red Sea shore,
Where Israel's tents do shine so bright.
Notebook Drafts (c. 1804). In W. H. Stevenson (ed.), The Poems of William Blake (1971), 481.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blow (44)  |  Bright (79)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gem (16)  |  Israel (6)  |  Light (607)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Particle (194)  |  Path (144)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Sand (62)  |  Sea (308)  |  Still (613)  |  Tent (11)  |  Vain (83)  |  Francois Marie Arouet Voltaire (38)  |  Wind (128)

Moreover, within the hollows of the earth,
When from one quarter the wind builds up, lunges,
Muscles the deep caves with its headstrong power,
The earth leans hard where the force of wind has pressed it;
Then above ground, the higher the house is built,
The nearer it rises to the sky, the worse
Will it lean that way and jut out perilously,
The beams wrenched loose and hanging ready to fall.
And to think, men can't believe that for this world
Some time of death and ruin lies in wait,
Yet they see so great a mass of earth collapse!
And the winds pause for breath—that's lucky, for else
No force could rein things galloping to destruction.
But since they pause for breath, to rally their force,
Come building up and then fall driven back,
More often the earth will threaten ruin than
Perform it. The earth will lean and then sway back,
Its wavering mass restored to the right poise.
That explains why all houses reel, top floor
Most then the middle, and ground floor hardly at all.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 6, lines 558-77, 216.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Breath (59)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Cave (15)  |  Death (388)  |  Deep (233)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fall (230)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hard (243)  |  House (140)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Perform (121)  |  Power (746)  |  Right (452)  |  Rise (166)  |  Ruin (42)  |  See (1081)  |  Sky (161)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  World (1774)

Nor ever yet
The melting rainbow's vernal-tinctur'd hues
To me have shone so pleasing, as when first
the hand of science pointed out the path
In which the sun-beams gleaming from the west
Fall on the watery cloud.
The Pleasures of Imagination (1818), 50.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Fall (230)  |  First (1283)  |  Path (144)  |  Poem (96)  |  Point (580)  |  Rainbow (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sun (385)

Of all the constituents of the human body, bone is the hardest, the driest, the earthiest, and the coldest; and, excepting only the teeth, it is devoid of sensation. God, the great Creator of all things, formed its substance to this specification with good reason, intending it to be like a foundation for the whole body; for in the fabric of the human body bones perform the same function as do walls and beams in houses, poles in tents, and keels and ribs in boats.
Bones Differentiated by Function
Some bones, by reason of their strength, form as it were props for the body; these include the tibia, the femur, the spinal vertebrae, and most of the bony framework. Others are like bastions, defense walls, and ramparts, affording natural protection to other parts; examples are the skull, the spines and transverse processes of the vertebrae, the breast bone, the ribs. Others stand in front of the joints between certain bones, to ensure that the joint does not move too loosely or bend to too acute an angle. This is the function of the tiny bones, likened by the professors of anatomy to the size of a sesame seed, which are attached to the second internode of the thumb, the first internode of the other four fingers and the first internodes of the five toes. The teeth, on the other hand, serve specifically to cut, crush, pound and grind our food, and similarly the two ossicles in the organ of hearing perform a specifically auditory function.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, 1, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in 'Nature of Bone; Function of Bones', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Angle (20)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Auditory (2)  |  Bastion (3)  |  Bend (12)  |  Boat (16)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Breast (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Creator (91)  |  Crush (18)  |  Cut (114)  |  Defense (23)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Driest (2)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Exception (73)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Finger (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Framework (31)  |  Function (228)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hardest (3)  |  Hearing (49)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Joint (31)  |  Keel (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Pole (46)  |  Pound (14)  |  Process (423)  |  Professor (128)  |  Prop (6)  |  Protection (36)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rib (6)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Serve (59)  |  Sesame (2)  |  Size (60)  |  Skull (5)  |  Specification (7)  |  Spine (9)  |  Stand (274)  |  Strength (126)  |  Substance (248)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Tent (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Toe (7)  |  Transverse (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Vertebra (4)  |  Wall (67)  |  Whole (738)

Perhaps a thousand other worlds that lie
Remote from us, and latent in the sky,
Are lightened by his beams, and kindly nurs’d.
From 'Eleanora' (1692). Collected in Samuel Johnson (ed.), The Works of th Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1800), Vol. 3, 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Latent (12)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Other (2236)  |  Remote (83)  |  Sky (161)  |  Thousand (331)  |  World (1774)

Science, illuminating ray!
Fair mental beam, extend thy sway, And shine from pole to pole!
From thy accumulated store,
O'er every mind thy riches pour, Excite from low desires to soar, And dignify the soul.
'Botany', I. From Poems on Conchology and Botany (1831), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Desire (204)  |  Extend (128)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Low (80)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Poem (96)  |  Pole (46)  |  Ray (114)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soar (23)  |  Soul (226)  |  Store (48)

See with what force yon river’s crystal stream
Resists the weight of many a massy beam.
To sink the wood the more we vainly toil,
The higher it rebounds, with swift recoil.
Yet that the beam would of itself ascend
No man will rashly venture to contend.
Thus too the flame has weight, though highly rare,
Nor mounts but when compelled by heavier air.
De Rerum Natura, second book, as quoted in translation in Thomas Young, A Course of Lectures on Natural Philosophy and the Mechanical Arts (1845), 12.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Contend (6)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Flame (40)  |  Force (487)  |  Heavier (2)  |  Higher (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Mount (42)  |  Rare (89)  |  Rashness (2)  |  Rebound (2)  |  Recoil (6)  |  River (119)  |  See (1081)  |  Sink (37)  |  Stream (81)  |  Swift (12)  |  Toil (25)  |  Vain (83)  |  Venture (18)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)

The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI, to us insiders) has so far only proved that no matter what you beam up—the Pythagorean theorem, pictures of attractive nude people, etc.—the big 800 number in the sky does not return calls.
From essay 'First Person Secular: Blocking the Gates to Heaven', Mother Jones Magazine (Jun 1986), 48. Collected in The Worst Years of our Lives: Irreverent Notes from a Decade of Greed (1995), 267.
Science quotes on:  |  Attractive (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (20)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nude (3)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Picture (143)  |  Proof (287)  |  Return (124)  |  Search (162)  |  SETI (3)  |  Sky (161)  |  Theorem (112)

The sun has lost no beams, the earth no elements ; gravity is as adhesive, heat as expansive, light as joyful, air as virtuous, water as medicinal as on the first day. There is no loss, only transference. When the heat is less here it is not lost, but more heat is there.
In 'Perpetual Forces', North American Review (1877), No. 125. Collected in Ralph Waldo Emerson and James Elliot Cabot (ed.), Lectures and Biographical Sketches (1883), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Adhesive (2)  |  Air (347)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Expansive (5)  |  First (1283)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Heat (174)  |  Light (607)  |  Loss (110)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Sun (385)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Virtuous (9)  |  Water (481)

There is not perhaps another object in the heavens that presents us with such a variety of extraordinary phenomena as the planet Saturn: a magnificent globe, encompassed by a stupendous double ring: attended by seven satellites: ornamented with equatorial belts: compressed at the poles: turning upon its axis: mutually eclipsing its ring and satellites, and eclipsed by them: the most distant of the rings also turning upon its axis, and the same taking place with the farthest of the satellites: all the parts of the system of Saturn occasionally reflecting light to each other: the rings and moons illuminating the nights of the Saturnian: the globe and satellites enlightening the dark parts of the rings: and the planet and rings throwing back the sun's beams upon the moons, when they are deprived of them at the time of their conjunctions. (1805)
Quoted in John Vose, A System of Astronomy: On the Principles of Copernicus (1827), 66-67.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Attend (65)  |  Back (390)  |  Conjunction (10)  |  Dark (140)  |  Enlightening (3)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Light (607)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Moon (237)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pole (46)  |  Present (619)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Saturn (13)  |  Stupendous (13)  |  Sun (385)  |  System (537)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variety (132)

There was no instant when a mist of plankton … was not swirling in the path of the beam [of the bathysphere].
As quoted by Rachel Carson in The Sea Around Us (1950, 2003), 62. Carson states that in his bathysphere descent, more than a quarter of a mile down, Beebe reported aggregations of living things “as thick as I have ever seen them.” At half a mile—the deepest descent of the bathysphere—Dr. Beebe recalled the mist of plankton.
Science quotes on:  |  Bathysphere (2)  |  Instant (45)  |  Mist (14)  |  Path (144)  |  Plankton (3)  |  Swirl (10)

This Academy [at Lagado] is not an entire single Building, but a Continuation of several Houses on both Sides of a Street; which growing waste, was purchased and applied to that Use.
I was received very kindly by the Warden, and went for many Days to the Academy. Every Room hath in it ' one or more Projectors; and I believe I could not be in fewer than five Hundred Rooms.
The first Man I saw was of a meagre Aspect, with sooty Hands and Face, his Hair and Beard long, ragged and singed in several Places. His Clothes, Shirt, and Skin were all of the same Colour. He had been Eight Years upon a Project for extracting Sun-Beams out of Cucumbers, which were to be put into Vials hermetically sealed, and let out to warm the Air in raw inclement Summers. He told me, he did not doubt in Eight Years more, that he should be able to supply the Governor's Gardens with Sunshine at a reasonable Rate; but he complained that his Stock was low, and interested me to give him something as an Encouragement to Ingenuity, especially since this had been a very dear Season for Cucumbers. I made him a small Present, for my Lord had furnished me with Money on purpose, because he knew their Practice of begging from all who go to see them.
I saw another at work to calcine Ice into Gunpowder; who likewise shewed me a Treatise he had written concerning the Malleability of Fire, which he intended to publish.
There was a most ingenious Architect who had contrived a new Method for building Houses, by beginning at the Roof, and working downwards to the Foundation; which he justified to me by the life Practice of those two prudent Insects the Bee and the Spider.
In another Apartment I was highly pleased with a Projector, who had found a device of plowing the Ground with Hogs, to save the Charges of Plows, Cattle, and Labour. The Method is this: In an Acre of Ground you bury at six Inches Distance, and eight deep, a quantity of Acorns, Dates, Chestnuts, and other Masts or Vegetables whereof these Animals are fondest; then you drive six Hundred or more of them into the Field, where in a few Days they will root up the whole Ground in search of their Food, and make it fit for sowing, at the same time manuring it with their Dung. It is true, upon Experiment they found the Charge and Trouble very great, and they had little or no Crop. However, it is not doubted that this Invention may be capable of great Improvement.
I had hitherto seen only one Side of the Academy, the other being appropriated to the Advancers of speculative Learning.
Some were condensing Air into a dry tangible Substance, by extracting the Nitre, and letting the acqueous or fluid Particles percolate: Others softening Marble for Pillows and Pin-cushions. Another was, by a certain Composition of Gums, Minerals, and Vegetables outwardly applied, to prevent the Growth of Wool upon two young lambs; and he hoped in a reasonable Time to propagate the Breed of naked Sheep all over the Kingdom.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 5, 223.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academy (35)  |  Acorn (4)  |  Acre (12)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Applied (177)  |  Architect (29)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Bee (40)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Breed (24)  |  Building (156)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Certain (550)  |  Charge (59)  |  Chestnut (2)  |  Composition (84)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Crop (25)  |  Cucumber (4)  |  Date (13)  |  Deep (233)  |  Device (70)  |  Distance (161)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dry (57)  |  Dung (7)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Food (199)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Garden (60)  |  Governor (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Hermetic Seal (2)  |  Hog (4)  |  House (140)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ice (54)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lord (93)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marble (20)  |  Mast (3)  |  Method (505)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pillow (4)  |  Pin (18)  |  Plow (7)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Project (73)  |  Projector (3)  |  Publish (36)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raw (28)  |  Root (120)  |  Save (118)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seal (18)  |  Search (162)  |  Season (47)  |  See (1081)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Side (233)  |  Single (353)  |  Skin (47)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Soot (9)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Spider (14)  |  Substance (248)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunbeam (3)  |  Supply (93)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Vial (4)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Waste (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wool (4)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

This is a huge step toward unraveling Genesis Chapter 1, Verse 1—what happened in the beginning. This is a Genesis machine. It'll help to recreate the most glorious event in the history of the universe.
[Comment on a milestone experiment, the collision of two proton beams at higher energy than ever before, upon the restarting of the Large Hadron Collider after a major failure and shutdown for repair.]
As quoted by Alexander G. Higgins and Seth Borenstein (AP) in 'Atom Smasher Will Help Reveal "The Beginning" ', Bloomberg Businessweek (30 Mar 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Collision (15)  |  Energy (344)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Glory (58)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Happening (58)  |  History (673)  |  Huge (25)  |  Large (394)  |  Large Hadron Collider (6)  |  Machine (257)  |  Major (84)  |  Most (1731)  |  Proton (21)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Step (231)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unraveling (3)  |  Verse (11)

What do we plant when we plant the tree?
We plant the ship, which will cross the sea.
We plant the mast to carry the sails;
We plant the planks to withstand the gales—
The keel, the keelson, and beam and knee;
We plant the ship when we plant the tree.

What do we plant when we plant the tree?
We plant the houses for you and me.
We plant the rafters, the shingles, the floors,
We plant the studding, the lath, the doors,
The beams and siding, all parts that be;
We plant the house when we plant the tree.

What do we plant when we plant the tree?
A thousand things that we daily see;
We plant the spire that out-towers the crag,
We plant the staff for our country's flag,
We plant the shade, from the hot sun free;
We plant all these when we plant the tree.
(Feb 1890) In The Poems of Henry Abbey (1895), 262.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Carry (127)  |  Country (251)  |  Crag (4)  |  Daily (87)  |  Do (1908)  |  Door (93)  |  Flag (11)  |  Floor (20)  |  Forestry (16)  |  Free (232)  |  Hot (60)  |  House (140)  |  Keel (4)  |  Mast (3)  |  Plank (4)  |  Plant (294)  |  Planting (4)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shingle (2)  |  Ship (62)  |  Spire (5)  |  Staff (5)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tower (42)  |  Tree (246)  |  Will (2355)

When I undertake the dissection of a human cadaver I pass a stout rope tied like a noose beneath the lower jaw and through the two zygomas up to the top of the head, either more toward the forehead or more toward the occiput according as I want the cadaver to hang with its head up or down. The longer end of the noose I run through a pulley fixed to a beam in the room so that I may raise or lower the cadaver as it hangs there or may turn it round in any direction to suit my purpose; and should I so wish I can allow it to recline at an angle upon a table, since a table can easily be placed underneath the pulley. This is how the cadaver was suspended for drawing all the muscle tables... though while that one was being drawn the rope was passed around the occiput so as to show the muscles in the neck. If the lower jaw has been removed in the course of dissection, or the zygomas have been broken, the hollows for the temporal muscles will nonetheless hold the noose sufficiently firmly. You must take care not to put the noose around the neck, unless some of the muscles connected to the occipital bone have already been cut away. It is best to suspend the cadaver like this because a human body lying on a table is very difficult to turn over on to its chest or its back.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem (1543), Book II, 268, as translated by William Frank Richardson and John Burd Carman, in 'How the Cadaver Can Be Held Erect While These Muscles are Dissected', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book II: The Ligaments and Muscles (1998), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Best (459)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Broken (56)  |  Cadaver (2)  |  Care (186)  |  Connect (125)  |  Course (409)  |  Cut (114)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Down (456)  |  Drawing (56)  |  End (590)  |  Hang (45)  |  Head (81)  |  Human (1468)  |  Jaw (4)  |  Lying (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neck (15)  |  Noose (2)  |  Pass (238)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rope (7)  |  Run (174)  |  Show (346)  |  Suspended (5)  |  Table (104)  |  Through (849)  |  Top (96)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.