Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: British

British Quotes (41 quotes)

Gilbert shall live, till Load-stones cease to draw,
Or British Fleets the boundless Ocean awe.
'Of Miscellany Poems To my Honor’d Friend Dr. Charleton On his Learned and Useful Works; But more particularly his Treatise of Stone-Heng, By him restored to the true Founders', collected in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (1704), 39. (Dr Walter Charleton was physician in ordinary to King Charles I. His treatise on Stonehenge was published in 1663.)
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (43)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Cease (79)  |  Draw (137)  |  William Gilbert (10)  |  Live (628)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Poem (96)  |  Stone (162)

[As Chief Scientific Adviser to the British Ministry of Defence] We persist in regarding ourselves as a Great Power, capable of everything and only temporarily handicapped by economic difficulties. We are not a great power and never will be again. We are a great nation, but if we continue to behave like a Great Power we shall soon cease to be a great nation. Let us take warning from the fate of the Great Powers of the past and not burst ourselves with pride (see Aesop’s fable of the frog). (1949)
As quoted by Peter Hennessy, Whitehall (1989), 155.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Behave (17)  |  Burst (39)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cease (79)  |  Chief (97)  |  Continue (165)  |  Defence (14)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fable (12)  |  Fate (72)  |  Frog (38)  |  Great (1574)  |  Handicap (6)  |  Handicapped (7)  |  Nation (193)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Past (337)  |  Persist (11)  |  Power (746)  |  Pride (78)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Soon (186)  |  Warning (17)  |  Will (2355)

A great reform in geological speculation seems now to have become necessary. … It is quite certain that a great mistake has been made—that British popular geology at the present time is in direct opposition to the principles of Natural Philosophy.
From Sir W. Thomson, Address (27 Feb 1868), to the Geological Society of Glasgow, 'On Geological Time', Transactions of the Geological Society of Glasgow 3, collected in Popular Lectures and Addresses (1894), Vol. 2, 10 & 44. As Epigraph in Thomas Henry Huxley, 'Geological Reform' (1869), Collected Essays: Discourses, Biological and Geological (1894), 306.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Certain (550)  |  Direct (225)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Popular (29)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reform (22)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Time (1877)

An article in Bioscience in November 1987 by Julie Ann Miller claimed the cortex was a “quarter-meter square.” That is napkin-sized, about ten inches by ten inches. Scientific American magazine in September 1992 upped the ante considerably with an estimate of 1½ square meters; that’s a square of brain forty inches on each side, getting close to the card-table estimate. A psychologist at the University of Toronto figured it would cover the floor of his living room (I haven’t seen his living room), but the prize winning estimate so far is from the British magazine New Scientist’s poster of the brain published in 1993 which claimed that the cerebral cortex, if flattened out, would cover a tennis court. How can there be such disagreement? How can so many experts not know how big the cortex is? I don’t know, but I’m on the hunt for an expert who will say the cortex, when fully spread out, will cover a football field. A Canadian football field.
In The Burning House: Unlocking the Mysteries of the Brain (1994, 1995), 11.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Brain (270)  |  Claim (146)  |  Court (33)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Expert (65)  |  Field (364)  |  Football (10)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Know (1518)  |  Living (491)  |  New (1216)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Side (233)  |  Spread (83)  |  Square (70)  |  Table (104)  |  Tennis (8)  |  University (121)  |  Will (2355)  |  Winning (19)

As pilgrimages to the shrines of saints draw thousands of English Catholics to the Continent, there may be some persons in the British Islands sufficiently in love with science, not only to revere the memory of its founders, but to wish for a description of the locality and birth-place of a great master of knowledge—John Dalton—who did more for the world’s civilisation than all the reputed saints in Christendom.
In The Worthies of Cumberland (1874), 25.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Birth (147)  |  Britain (24)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Continent (76)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Draw (137)  |  Founder (26)  |  Great (1574)  |  Island (46)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Love (309)  |  Master (178)  |  Memory (134)  |  More (2559)  |  Person (363)  |  Pilgrimage (4)  |  Repute (2)  |  Revere (2)  |  Saint (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shrine (8)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

At present good work in science pays less well very often than mediocrity in other subjects. This, as was pointed out by Sir Lyon Playfair in his Presidential Address to the British Association in 1885 helps to arrest progress in science teaching.
In Sir Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Physical Science and the Woolwich Examinations', Nature (23 Feb 1888), 37, 386. Webmaster has assumed this unsigned lead article (editorial?) should be attributed to the Editor.
Science quotes on:  |  Address (12)  |  Arrest (8)  |  Association (46)  |  British Association (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pay (43)  |  Lyon Playfair (5)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Work (1351)

Borel makes the amusing supposition of a million monkeys allowed to play upon the keys of a million typewriters. What is the chance that this wanton activity should reproduce exactly all of the volumes which are contained in the library of the British Museum? It certainly is not a large chance, but it may be roughly calculated, and proves in fact to be considerably larger than the chance that a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen will separate into the two pure constituents. After we have learned to estimate such minute chances, and after we have overcome our fear of numbers which are very much larger or very much smaller than those ordinarily employed, we might proceed to calculate the chance of still more extraordinary occurrences, and even have the boldness to regard the living cell as a result of random arrangement and rearrangement of its atoms. However, we cannot but feel that this would be carrying extrapolation too far. This feeling is due not merely to a recognition of the enormous complexity of living tissue but to the conviction that the whole trend of life, the whole process of building up more and more diverse and complex structures, which we call evolution, is the very opposite of that which we might expect from the laws of chance.
The Anatomy of Science (1926), 158-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Atom (355)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Émile Borel (2)  |  Building (156)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Due (141)  |  Employ (113)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Extrapolation (6)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Library (48)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Merely (316)  |  Minute (125)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Monkey (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Museum (31)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Number (699)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Pure (291)  |  Random (41)  |  Rearrangement (5)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  Separate (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Trend (22)  |  Two (937)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

By God’s mercy British and American science outpaced all German efforts. … This revelation of the secrets of nature, long mercifully withheld from man, should arouse the most solemn reflections in the mind and conscience of every human being capable of comprehension. We must indeed pray that these awful agencies will be made to conduce to peace among the nations, and that instead of wreaking measureless havoc upon the entire globe, may become a perennial fountain of world prosperity.
[Concerning use of the atomic bomb.]
Statement drafted by Churchill following the use of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. Due to the change in government, the statement was released by Clement Attlee (6 Aug 1945). In Sir Winston Churchill, Victory: War Speeches by the Right Hon. Winston Churchill (1946), 289.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agency (14)  |  All (4108)  |  Arousal (2)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Awful (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Conduce (2)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Effort (227)  |  Fountain (16)  |  German (36)  |  Globe (47)  |  God (757)  |  Havoc (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Peace (108)  |  Perennial (9)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Prosperity (21)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secret (194)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Cavendish gave me once some bits of platinum for my experiments, and came to see my results on the decomposition of the alkalis, and seemed to take an interest in them; but he encouraged no intimacy with any one, and received nobody at his own house. … He was acute, sagacious, and profound, and, I think, the most accomplished British philosopher of his time.
As quoted in Victor Robinson, Pathfinders in Medicine (1912), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Acute (7)  |  Alkali (6)  |  Henry Cavendish (7)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Give (202)  |  House (140)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intimacy (6)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Platinum (6)  |  Profound (104)  |  Receive (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)

Cavendish was a great Man with extraordinary singularities—His voice was squeaking his manner nervous He was afraid of strangers & seemed when embarrassed to articulate with difficulty—He wore the costume of our grandfathers. Was enormously rich but made no use of his wealth... He Cavendish lived latterly the life of a solitary, came to the Club dinner & to the Royal Society: but received nobody at his home. He was acute sagacious & profound & I think the most accomplished British Philosopher of his time.
Quoted in J. Z. Fullmer, 'Davy's Sketches of his Contemporaries', Chymia, 1967, 12, 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Henry Cavendish (7)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Grandfather (14)  |  Great (1574)  |  Home (170)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Profound (104)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  Society (326)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Wealth (94)

During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we can see the emergence of a tension that has yet to be resolved, concerning the attitude of scientists towards the usefulness of science. During this time, scientists were careful not to stress too much their relationships with industry or the military. They were seeking autonomy for their activities. On the other hand, to get social support there had to be some perception that the fruits of scientific activity could have useful results. One resolution of this dilemma was to assert that science only contributed at the discovery stage; others, industrialists for example, could apply the results. ... Few noted the ... obvious paradox of this position; that, if scientists were to be distanced from the 'evil' effects of the applications of scientific ideas, so too should they receive no credit for the 'good' or socially beneficial, effects of their activities.
Co-author with Philip Gummett (1947- ), -British social scientist
Science, Technology and Society Today (1984), Introduction, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Author (167)  |  Autonomy (6)  |  Dilemma (11)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effect (393)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Evil (116)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Industry (137)  |  Military (40)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Perception (97)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Social (252)  |  Stage (143)  |  Stress (22)  |  Support (147)  |  Tension (24)  |  Time (1877)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

Every utterance from government - from justifying 90-day detention to invading other countries [and] to curtailing civil liberties - is about the dangers of religious division and fundamentalism. Yet New Labour is approving new faith schools hand over fist. We have had the grotesque spectacle of a British prime minister, on the floor of the House of Commons, defending - like some medieval crusader - the teaching of creationism in the science curriculum at a sponsor-run school whose running costs are wholly met from the public purse.
In The Guardian (10 Apr 2006).
Science quotes on:  |  Approval (10)  |  Britain (24)  |  Civil (26)  |  Common (436)  |  Cost (86)  |  Country (251)  |  Creationism (8)  |  Curriculum (10)  |  Danger (115)  |  Defense (23)  |  Detention (2)  |  Division (65)  |  Faith (203)  |  Floor (20)  |  Fundamentalism (4)  |  Government (110)  |  Grotesque (6)  |  House (140)  |  House Of Commons (2)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Justification (48)  |  Labour (98)  |  Medieval (10)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Public (96)  |  Purse (4)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Sponsor (5)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Wholly (88)

Fleets are not confined to the ocean, but now sail over the land. … All the power of the British Navy has not been able to prevent Zeppelins from reaching England and attacking London, the very heart of the British Empire. Navies do not protect against aerial attack. … Heavier-than-air flying machines of the aeroplane type have crossed right over the heads of armies, of million of men, armed with the most modern weapons of destruction, and have raided places in the rear. Armies do not protect against aerial war.
In 'Preparedness for Aerial Defense', Addresses Before the Eleventh Annual Convention of the Navy League of the United States, Washington, D.C., April 10-13, 1916 (1916), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Aerial (10)  |  Against (332)  |  Air (347)  |  Airplane (41)  |  All (4108)  |  Arm (81)  |  Army (33)  |  Attack (84)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Do (1908)  |  England (40)  |  Fleet (4)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Heart (229)  |  London (12)  |  Machine (257)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Navy (9)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Raid (4)  |  Right (452)  |  Sail (36)  |  Type (167)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Zeppelin (4)

His work was so great that it cannot be compassed in a few words. His death is one of the greatest losses ever to occur to British science.
Describing Ernest Rutherford upon his death at age 66. Thomson, then 80 years old, was once his teacher.
Quoted in Time Magazine (1 Nov 1937).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Compass (34)  |  Death (388)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Occur (150)  |  Old (481)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I knew, however, that it would cost ten times what I had available in order to build a molecular beam machine. I decided to follow a byway, rather than the highway. It is a procedure I have subsequently recommended to beginning scientists in this country, where research strategy is best modelled on that used by Wolfe at the Plains of Abraham.
(British General James Wolfe defeated the French defending Quebec in 1759 after scaling a cliff for a surprise attack.)
'A Scientist and the World He Lives In', Speech to the Empire Club of Canada (27 Nov 1986) in C. Frank Turner and Tim Dickson (eds.), The Empire Club of Canada Speeches 1986-1987 (1987), 149-161.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (84)  |  Available (78)  |  Beam (24)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Best (459)  |  Build (204)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Cost (86)  |  Country (251)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Machine (257)  |  Order (632)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Time (1877)

I will have nothing to do with a bomb!
[Response to being invited (1943) to work with Otto Robert Frisch and some British scientists at Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project to create the atomic bomb.]
Ruth Sime, Lise Meitner: A Life in Physics (1996), 305.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Being (1278)  |  Create (235)  |  Do (1908)  |  Los Alamos (5)  |  Manhattan Project (12)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Project (73)  |  Response (53)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

It is the middle of the night when a glittering theatre of light suddenly appears in front of the Dhaka. Where, moments before there was only darkness, suddenly there are hundreds of columns of light. The sound of helicopters and car horns carry across to the ship on the breeze. There is the scent of rain after it has evaporated from warm streets. This is unmistakably Singapore, the small city-state at the most southern point of the Asiatic mainland. Singapore was built as a centre for world trade by the British over 250 years ago, and today, Singapore has the largest container harbour in the world. This is where the axes of world trade cross paths: from the Far East to Europe, from the Far East to Southeast Asia/the East, and from the Far East to Australia. Everything runs like clockwork here. Within five hours the Dhaka has been unloaded.
Made on Earth
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Appear (118)  |  Asia (5)  |  Australia (8)  |  Axe (15)  |  Breeze (6)  |  Build (204)  |  Car (71)  |  Carry (127)  |  Centre (28)  |  City (78)  |  Clockwork (7)  |  Column (15)  |  Cross (16)  |  Darkness (68)  |  East (18)  |  Europe (43)  |  Evaporate (5)  |  Everything (476)  |  Far (154)  |  Five (16)  |  Front (16)  |  Glitter (8)  |  Harbour (2)  |  Helicopter (2)  |  Horn (18)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hundreds (6)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Light (607)  |  Mainland (3)  |  Middle (16)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Night (120)  |  Path (144)  |  Point (580)  |  Rain (62)  |  Run (174)  |  Scent (7)  |  Ship (62)  |  Singapore (2)  |  Small (477)  |  Sound (183)  |  Southern (3)  |  State (491)  |  Street (23)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Theatre (5)  |  Today (314)  |  Trade (31)  |  Unmistakably (2)  |  Warm (69)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It seems very strange … that in the course of the world’s history so obvious an improvement should never have been adopted. … The next generation of Britishers would be the better for having had this extra hour of daylight in their childhood.
In Report, and Special Report, from the Select Committee on the Daylight Saving Bill: Minutes of Evidence (1908), 116.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adopt (19)  |  Better (486)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Course (409)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Daylight Saving Time (10)  |  Extra (6)  |  Generation (242)  |  History (673)  |  Hour (186)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Never (1087)  |  Next (236)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Seem (145)  |  Strange (157)  |  World (1774)

J. J. Sylvester was an enthusiastic supporter of reform [in the teaching of geometry]. The difference in attitude on this question between the two foremost British mathematicians, J. J. Sylvester, the algebraist, and Arthur Cayley, the algebraist and geometer, was grotesque. Sylvester wished to bury Euclid “deeper than e’er plummet sounded” out of the schoolboy’s reach; Cayley, an ardent admirer of Euclid, desired the retention of Simson’s Euclid. When reminded that this treatise was a mixture of Euclid and Simson, Cayley suggested striking out Simson’s additions and keeping strictly to the original treatise.
In History of Elementary Mathematics (1910), 285.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  Admirer (9)  |  Ardent (6)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Bury (16)  |  Arthur Cayley (17)  |  Deep (233)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difference (337)  |  Enthusiastic (6)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Foremost (11)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grotesque (6)  |  Keep (101)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Original (58)  |  Plummet (2)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reform (22)  |  Remind (13)  |  Retention (5)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Sound (183)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (68)  |  Striking (48)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supporter (4)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Wish (212)

Many years ago the great British explorer George Mallory, who was to die on Mount Everest, was asked why did he want to climb it. He said, “Because it is there.” Well, space is there, and we’re going to climb it, and the moon and the planets are there, and new hopes for knowledge and peace are there. And, therefore, as we set sail we ask God’s blessing on the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bless (25)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Climb (35)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Die (86)  |  Embark (7)  |  Explorer (28)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hazardous (2)  |  Hope (299)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  George Mallory (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moon (237)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount Everest (5)  |  New (1216)  |  Peace (108)  |  Planet (356)  |  Sail (36)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Space (500)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (933)

Nervous messages are invariably associated with an electrical change known as the action potential. This potential is generally believed to arise at a membrane which is situated between the axoplasm and the external medium. If this theory is correct, it should be possible to record the action potential between an electrode inside a nerve fibre and the conducting fluid outside it. Most nerve fibres are too small for this to be tested directly, but we have recently succeeded in inserting micro-electrodes into the giant axons of squids (Loligo forbesi).
Co-author with Andrew Aelding Huxley, British physiologist, (1917- ).
'Action Potentials Recorded from Inside a Nerve Fibre', Nature (1939), 144, 710.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Arise (158)  |  Author (167)  |  Change (593)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Giant (67)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Known (454)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Message (49)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Possible (552)  |  Potential (69)  |  Record (154)  |  Small (477)  |  Squid (3)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)

Scientists and Drapers. Why should the botanist, geologist or other-ist give himself such airs over the draper’s assistant? Is it because he names his plants or specimens with Latin names and divides them into genera and species, whereas the draper does not formulate his classifications, or at any rate only uses his mother tongue when he does? Yet how like the sub-divisions of textile life are to those of the animal and vegetable kingdoms! A few great families—cotton, linen, hempen, woollen, silk, mohair, alpaca—into what an infinite variety of genera and species do not these great families subdivide themselves? And does it take less labour, with less intelligence, to master all these and to acquire familiarity with their various habits, habitats and prices than it does to master the details of any other great branch of science? I do not know. But when I think of Shoolbred’s on the one hand and, say, the ornithological collections of the British Museum upon the other, I feel as though it would take me less trouble to master the second than the first.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 218.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Assistant (6)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Branch (150)  |  Classification (97)  |  Collection (64)  |  Cotton (8)  |  Detail (146)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Family (94)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Genus (25)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Great (1574)  |  Habit (168)  |  Habitat (16)  |  Himself (461)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Labour (98)  |  Latin (38)  |  Life (1795)  |  Linen (8)  |  Master (178)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Tongue (3)  |  Museum (31)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Price (51)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Silk (13)  |  Species (401)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Textile (2)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Various (200)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Why (491)  |  Wool (4)

The “British Association for the Promotion of Science,” … is almost necessary for the purposes of science. The periodical assemblage of persons, pursuing the same or différent branches of knowledge, always produces an excitement which is favourable to the development of new ideas; whilst the long period of repose which succeeds, is advantageous for the prosecution of the reasonings or the experiments then suggested; and the récurrence of the meeting in the succeeding year, will stimulate the activity of the inquirer, by the hope of being then enabled to produce the successful result of his labours.
In 'Future Prospects', On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures (1st ed., 1832), chap. 32, 274. Note: The British Association for the Advancement of Science held its first meeting at York in 1831, the year before the first publication of this book in 1832.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Advantageous (10)  |  Assemblage (17)  |  Assembly (13)  |  Association (46)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Conference (17)  |  Development (422)  |  Different (577)  |  Enable (119)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Favourable (3)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Information (166)  |  Inquirer (9)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Long (790)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Period (198)  |  Periodic (3)  |  Person (363)  |  Produce (104)  |  Promotion (7)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reasonings (2)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Society (326)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

The British Mathematical Colloquium consists of three days of mathematics with no dogs and no wives.
Quoted in Des MacHale, Comic Sections (1993)
Science quotes on:  |  Colloquium (2)  |  Consist (223)  |  Day (42)  |  Dog (70)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Wife (41)

The British Medical Association is a club of London physicians and surgeons who once a year visit and patronize their professional friends in the country.
Anonymous
Medical Times and Gazette (18 Jan 1870), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (46)  |  Country (251)  |  Friend (168)  |  Physician (273)  |  Professional (70)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Year (933)

The discoveries of Newton have done more for England and for the race, than has been done by whole dynasties of British monarchs; and we doubt not that in the great mathematical birth of 1853, the Quaternions of Hamilton, there is as much real promise of benefit to mankind as in any event of Victoria’s reign.
In 'Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 228.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Birth (147)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dynasty (7)  |  England (40)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Event (216)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hamilton (2)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Monarch (4)  |  More (2559)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Promise (67)  |  Quaternion (9)  |  Race (268)  |  Real (149)  |  Reign (23)  |  Whole (738)

The history of penicillin is one of the disgraces of medical research. Fleming published his classic paper in the British Journal of Experimental Pathology for June, 1929, but it was not until 1939 that Florey followed up the clue. An antiseptic which is almost ideal, inasmuch as it has no toxic effects, was allowed to slumber for ten years. Had it not been for the exigencies of the present war it might be slumbering still.
In book review, 'The Story of a Neglected Miracle', New York Times (25 Mar 1945), BR3. (The book being reviewed was J.D. Ratcliff, Yellow Magic: The Story of Penicillin.)
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Antiseptic (8)  |  Classic (11)  |  Clue (17)  |  Disgrace (12)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exigency (3)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Sir Alexander Fleming (19)  |  Sir Howard Walter Florey (3)  |  Follow (378)  |  History (673)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Journal (30)  |  Medical (26)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Present (619)  |  Publish (36)  |  Research (664)  |  Slumber (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Toxic (2)  |  War (225)  |  Year (933)

The House is composed of very good men, not shining, but honest and reasonably well-informed, and in time will be found to improve, and not much inferior in eloquence, science, and dignity, to the British Commons. They are patriotic enough, and I believe there are more stupid (as well as more shining) people in the latter, in proportion.
Letter to George Richard Minot (27 May 1789). Quoted in Set Ames (Ed.) Works of Fisher Ames (1854), Vol. 1, 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Enough (340)  |  Good (889)  |  Government (110)  |  Honest (50)  |  House (140)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Inform (47)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shining (35)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Time (1877)  |  Well-Informed (5)  |  Will (2355)

The inclusion of lemon or lime juice in grog, made compulsory in 1795, therefore reduced the incidence of scurvy dramatically. And since beer contains no vitamin C, switching from beer to grog made British crews far healthier overall.
In A History of the World in 6 Glasses (2005, 2009), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Beer (10)  |  Compulsory (7)  |  Containing (4)  |  Crew (9)  |  Grog (2)  |  Health (193)  |  Incidence (2)  |  Inclusion (5)  |  Juice (7)  |  Lemon (2)  |  Lime (3)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Overall (9)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Scurvy (5)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vitamin (13)  |  Vitamin C (3)

The nature of the connexion between the mind and nervous matter has ever been, and must continue to be, the deepest mystery in physiology; and they who study the laws of Nature, as ordinances of God, will regard it as one of those secrets of his counsels ‘which Angels desire to look into.’
[Co-author with William Bowman]
In Robert Todd and William Bowman, The Physiological Anatomy and Physiology of Man (1845), Vol. 1, 262. Bowman was a British surgeon (1816-1892).
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (44)  |  Author (167)  |  Coauthor (2)  |  Connection (162)  |  Continue (165)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Deepest (4)  |  Desire (204)  |  God (757)  |  Law (894)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Ordinance (2)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Regard (305)  |  Secret (194)  |  Study (653)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Will (2355)

The popular and scientific views of “race” no longer coincide. The word “race,” as applied scientifically to human groupings, has lost any sharpness of meaning. To-day it is hardly definable in scientific terms, except as an abstract concept which may, under certain conditions, very different from those now prevalent, have been realized approximately in the past and might, under certain other but equally different conditions, be realized in the distant future.
Co-author with British anthropologist Alfred Cort Haddon (1855-1940).
In Julian S. Huxley and A.C. Haddon, We Europeans: A survey of “Racial” Problems (1935), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Applied (177)  |  Author (167)  |  Certain (550)  |  Concept (221)  |  Condition (356)  |  Different (577)  |  Equally (130)  |  Future (429)  |  Human (1468)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Race (268)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sharpness (8)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  View (488)  |  Word (619)

The Royal Navy’s unique ability to combat scurvy was said by one naval physician to have doubled its performance and contributed directly to Britain’s eventual defeat of the French and Spanish fleets at Trafalgar in 1805. (It also meant that British sailors became known as “limeys.”)
In A History of the World in 6 Glasses (2005, 2009), 110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Britain (24)  |  Combat (15)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Fleet (4)  |  France (27)  |  Known (454)  |  Navy (9)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Performance (48)  |  Physician (273)  |  Royal (57)  |  Sailor (16)  |  Scurvy (5)  |  Spain (4)  |  Trafalgar (2)  |  Unique (67)

The tendency of the sciences has long been an increasing proclivity of separation and dismemberment … The mathematician turns away from the chemist; the chemist from the naturalist; the mathematician, left to himself divides himself into a pure mathematician and a mixed mathematician, who soon part company … And thus science, even mere physical science, loses all traces of unity. A curious illustration of this result may be observed in the want of any name by which we can designate the students of the knowledge of the material world collectively. We are informed that this difficulty was felt very oppressively by the members of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, at their meetings at York, Oxford and Cambridge, in the last three summers. There was no general term by which these gentlemen could describe themselves with reference to their pursuits … some ingenious gentleman [William Whewell] proposed that, by analogy with artist, they might form Scientist, and added that there could be no scruple … when we have words such as sciolist, economist, and atheist—but this was not generally palatable.
In Review of Mrs Somerville, 'On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences', The Quarterly Review (1834), 51, 58-61.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Artist (90)  |  Association (46)  |  Atheist (15)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Company (59)  |  Curious (91)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Designation (13)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dismemberment (3)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Economist (17)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Himself (461)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Name (333)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Palatable (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sciolist (2)  |  Separation (57)  |  Soon (186)  |  Student (300)  |  Summer (54)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unity (78)  |  Want (497)  |  William Whewell (70)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

The ‘Doctrine of Uniformity’ in Geology, as held by many of the most eminent of British Geologists, assumes that the earth’s surface and upper crust have been nearly as they are at present in temperature, and other physical qualities, during millions of millions of years. But the heat which we know, by observation, to be now conducted out of the earth yearly is so great, that if this action has been going on with any approach to uniformity for 20,000 million years, the amount of heat lost out of the earth would have been about as much as would heat, by 100 Cent., a quantity of ordinary surface rock of 100 times the earth’s bulk. This would be more than enough to melt a mass of surface rock equal in bulk to the whole earth. No hypothesis as to chemical action, internal fluidity, effects of pressure at great depth, or possible character of substances in the interior of the earth, possessing the smallest vestige of probability, can justify the supposition that the earth’s upper crust has remained nearly as it is, while from the whole, or from any part, of the earth, so great a quantity of heat has been lost.
In 'The “Doctrine of Uniformity” in Geology Briefly Refuted' (1866), Popular Lectures and Addresses (1891), Vol. 2, 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Amount (151)  |  Approach (108)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Crust (38)  |  Depth (94)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enough (340)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Interior (32)  |  Internal (66)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Observation (555)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Probability (130)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rock (161)  |  Substance (248)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Surface (209)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Vestige (11)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

There is a story which shows his ready wit, dating from the meeting of the British Association in Canada before the war. Tizard and a colleague inadvertently crossed over into the United States, near Niagara. When challenged by a policeman, and not having their passports with them, they produced their British Association membership cards. When the policeman told them that “The American Government doesn't recognise British Science,” the lightning reply came from Tizard, “Oh, that's all right, neither does the British Government.”
In Studies of War, Nuclear and Conventional (1962), 119.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  American (46)  |  Association (46)  |  British Association (2)  |  Canada (6)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Government (110)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Membership (5)  |  Niagara (8)  |  Policeman (2)  |  Produced (187)  |  Recognise (9)  |  Reply (56)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  State (491)  |  Story (118)  |  Sir Henry Tizard (5)  |  War (225)  |  Wit (59)

We are in the presence of a recruiting drive systematically and deliberately undertaken by American business, by American universities, and to a lesser extent, American government, often initiated by talent scouts specially sent over here to buy British brains and preempt them for service of the U.S.A. … I look forward earnestly to the day when some reform of the American system of school education enables them to produce their own scientists so that, in an amiable free trade of talent, there may be adequate interchange between our country and theirs, and not a one-way traffic.
Speaking as Britain's Minister of Science in the House of Lords (27 Feb 1963). In 'The Manhunters: British Minister Blames American Recruiters for Emigration of Scientists', Science Magazine (8 Mar 1963), 893. See also the reply from the leader of the Labour Party, Harold Wilson, by using the link below.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adequate (46)  |  America (127)  |  Amiable (10)  |  Brain (270)  |  Britain (24)  |  Business (149)  |  Country (251)  |  Deliberately (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Enable (119)  |  Extent (139)  |  Forward (102)  |  Free (232)  |  Government (110)  |  Interchange (4)  |  Look (582)  |  One-Way (2)  |  Presence (63)  |  Produce (104)  |  Recruiting (3)  |  Reform (22)  |  School (219)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Service (110)  |  System (537)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Talent (94)  |  Traffic (10)  |  University (121)  |  Way (1217)

With the ministry’s motto ‘Research on a Shoestring’ emblazoned on his coat of arms, he has to struggle with a treasury more interested in surtax relief than national survival. [Responding to an earlier statement by British Science Minister, Lord Hailsham, that British scientists were being recruited by the U.S.]
Address at the Imperial College of Science and Technology, London (28 Feb 1963). In 'Hailsham Chided on Science's Role', New York Times (1 Mar 1963), 2. See also aron Hailsham's original statement using the link below.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Being (1278)  |  Baron Quintin Hogg Hailsham of St. Marylebone (3)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lord (93)  |  Ministry (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Motto (28)  |  National (26)  |  Relief (30)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Statement (142)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survival (94)  |  Treasury (3)

You have heard of the new chemical nomenclature endeavored to be introduced by Lavoisier, Fourcroy, &c. Other chemists of this country, of equal note, reject it, and prove in my opinion that it is premature, insufficient and false. These latter are joined by the British chemists; and upon the whole, I think the new nomenclature will be rejected, after doing more harm than good. There are some good publications in it, which must be translated into the ordinary chemical language before they will be useful.
Letter to Dr. Currie (Paris, 1788). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 135. From H.A. Washington, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1853-54). Vol 2, 544.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Country (251)  |  Doing (280)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  False (100)  |  Comte de Antoine Francois Fourcroy (5)  |  Good (889)  |  Harm (39)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Language (293)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prove (250)  |  Publication (101)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Think (1086)  |  Useful (250)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

You, in this country [the USA], are subjected to the British insularity in weights and measures; you use the foot, inch and yard. I am obliged to use that system, but must apologize to you for doing so, because it is so inconvenient, and I hope Americans will do everything in their power to introduce the French metrical system. ... I look upon our English system as a wickedly, brain-destroying system of bondage under which we suffer. The reason why we continue to use it, is the imaginary difficulty of making a change, and nothing else; but I do not think in America that any such difficulty should stand in the way of adopting so splendidly useful a reform.
Journal of the Franklin Institute, Nov 1884, 118, 321-341
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Bondage (5)  |  Brain (270)  |  Change (593)  |  Continue (165)  |  Country (251)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Everything (476)  |  Hope (299)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Metric System (6)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Power (746)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reform (22)  |  Stand (274)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Think (1086)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

[Newton is the] British physicist linked forever in the schoolboy mind with an apple that fell and bore fruit throughout physics.
Anonymous
As given in Patricia Fara, Newton: The Making of Genius (2004), 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (40)  |  Bearing (9)  |  Britain (24)  |  Fall (230)  |  Forever (103)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Link (43)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myth (56)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Throughout (98)

[Radium emits electrons with a velocity so great that] one gram is enough to lift the whole of the British fleet to the top of Ben Nevis; and I am not quite certain that we could not throw in the French fleet as well.
As quoted in 'Radium', New York Times (22 Feb 1903), 6. The reporter clarifies that this statement is “popular not scientific.” However, it is somewhat prescient, since only two years later (1905) Einstein published his E=mc² formula relating mass and energy. The top of Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in Britain, is 1344-m high. As energy, one gram mass would lift about 68 million tonnes there—over a thousand modern battleships.
Science quotes on:  |  Britain (24)  |  Certain (550)  |  Electron (93)  |  Emission (17)  |  Emit (15)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fleet (4)  |  France (27)  |  Gram (4)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lift (55)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radium (25)  |  Top (96)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Whole (738)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.