Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Designation

Designation Quotes (10 quotes)
Designate Quotes

But, as we consider the totality of similarly broad and fundamental aspects of life, we cannot defend division by two as a natural principle of objective order. Indeed, the ‘stuff’ of the universe often strikes our senses as complex and shaded continua, admittedly with faster and slower moments, and bigger and smaller steps, along the way. Nature does not dictate dualities, trinities, quarterings, or any ‘objective’ basis for human taxonomies; most of our chosen schemes, and our designated numbers of categories, record human choices from a cornucopia of possibilities offered by natural variation from place to place, and permitted by the flexibility of our mental capacities. How many seasons (if we wish to divide by seasons at all) does a year contain? How many stages shall we recognize in a human life?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admittedly (2)  |  Aspect (43)  |  Basis (66)  |  Big (45)  |  Broad (20)  |  Capacity (51)  |  Category (10)  |  Choice (72)  |  Choose (41)  |  Complex (81)  |  Consider (52)  |  Contain (42)  |  Continua (3)  |  Defend (21)  |  Dictate (10)  |  Divide (28)  |  Division (27)  |  Fast (35)  |  Flexibility (5)  |  Fundamental (124)  |  Human (472)  |  Human Life (27)  |  Life (993)  |  Mental (58)  |  Moment (79)  |  Natural (131)  |  Nature (1081)  |  Number (188)  |  Objective (51)  |  Offer (29)  |  Often (81)  |  Order (173)  |  Permit (20)  |  Place (133)  |  Possibility (101)  |  Principle (232)  |  Recognize (45)  |  Record (59)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Season (24)  |  Sense (258)  |  Shade (22)  |  Similarly (3)  |  Slow (39)  |  Small (125)  |  Stage (43)  |  Step (78)  |  Strike (25)  |  Stuff (18)  |  Taxonomy (16)  |  Totality (9)  |  Universe (615)  |  Variation (52)  |  Wish (71)  |  Year (240)

Former arbiters of taste must have felt (as so many apostles of ‘traditional values’ and other highminded tags for restriction and conformity do today) that maintaining the social order required a concept of unalloyed heroism. Human beings so designated as role models had to embody all virtues of the paragon–which meant, of course, that they could not be described in their truly human and ineluctably faulted form.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Apostle (3)  |  Concept (103)  |  Conformity (9)  |  Describe (40)  |  Embody (13)  |  Fault (27)  |  Feel (133)  |  Form (223)  |  Former (19)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Human (472)  |  Human Beings (21)  |  Ineluctably (2)  |  Maintain (25)  |  Mean (76)  |  Of Course (16)  |  Paragon (4)  |  Require (38)  |  Restriction (7)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Taste (37)  |  Today (100)  |  Traditional (10)  |  Truly (22)  |  Value (188)  |  Virtue (55)

In the social production of their life, men enter into definite relations that are indispensable and independent of their will; these relations of production correspond to a definite stage of development of their material forces of production. The sum total of these relations of production constitutes the economic structure of society - the real foundation, on which rises a legal and political superstructure and to which correspond definite forms of social consciousness. The mode of production of material life determines the social, political and intellectual life process in general. It is not the consciousness of men that determines their being, but, on the contrary, their social being that determines their consciousness. At a certain stage of their development, the material productive forces in society come in conflict with the existing relations of production, or - what is but a legal expression for the same thing - with the property relations within which they have been at work before. From forms of development of the productive forces these relations turn into fetters. Then begins an epoch of social revolution. With the change of the economic foundation the entire immense superstructure is more or less rapidly transformed. In considering such transformations a distinction should always be made between the material transformation of the economic conditions of production, which can be determined with the precision of natural science, and the legal, political, religious, aesthetic or philosophic - in short, ideological forms in which men become conscious of this conflict and fight it out. Just as our opinion of an individual is not based on what he thinks of himself, so we can not judge of such a period of transformation by its own consciousness; on the contrary, this consciousness must be explained rather from the contradictions of material life, from the existing conflict between the social productive forces and the relations of production. No social order ever disappears before all the productive forces for which there is room in it have been developed; and new, higher relations of production never appear before the material conditions of their existence have matured in the womb of the old society itself. Therefore, mankind always sets itself only such tasks as it can solve; since, looking at the matter more closely, we will always find that the task itself arises only when the material conditions necessary for its solution already exist or are at least in the process of formation. In broad outlines we can designate the Asiatic, the ancient, the feudal, and the modern bourgeois modes of production as so many progressive epochs in the economic formation of society. The bourgeois relations of production are the last antagonistic form of the social process of production - antagonistic not in the sense of individual antagonism, but of one arising from the social conditions of life of the individuals; at the same time the productive forces developing in the womb of bourgeois society create the material conditions for the solution of that antagonism. This social formation constitutes, therefore, the closing chapter of the prehistoric stage of human society.
Karl Marx
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Already (24)  |  Ancient (71)  |  Antagonism (5)  |  Antagonistic (2)  |  Appear (71)  |  Arise (35)  |  Asiatic (2)  |  Base (46)  |  Become (130)  |  Begin (70)  |  Bourgeois (2)  |  Broad (20)  |  Certain (88)  |  Change (324)  |  Chapter (7)  |  Close (56)  |  Closely (9)  |  Condition (130)  |  Conflict (51)  |  Conscious (27)  |  Consciousness (73)  |  Consider (52)  |  Constitute (21)  |  Contradiction (46)  |  Contrary (23)  |  Correspond (5)  |  Create (114)  |  Definite (28)  |  Determine (49)  |  Develop (70)  |  Development (231)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Distinction (38)  |  Economic (23)  |  Enter (26)  |  Entire (34)  |  Epoch (15)  |  Exist (105)  |  Existence (265)  |  Explain (71)  |  Expression (85)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fight (40)  |  Find (297)  |  Force (208)  |  Form (223)  |  Formation (56)  |  Foundation (78)  |  General (99)  |  High (99)  |  Human Society (6)  |  Ideological (3)  |  Immense (34)  |  Independent (44)  |  Indispensable (9)  |  Individual (185)  |  Intellectual (85)  |  Judge (47)  |  Least (50)  |  Legal (6)  |  Life (993)  |  Mankind (217)  |  Material (129)  |  Matter (288)  |  Mature (10)  |  Mode (29)  |  Modern (110)  |  More Or Less (4)  |  Natural Science (64)  |  Necessary (92)  |  New (380)  |  Old (118)  |  Opinion (150)  |  Outline (7)  |  Period (51)  |  Philosophic (3)  |  Political (34)  |  Precision (39)  |  Prehistoric (7)  |  Process (210)  |  Production (107)  |  Productive (13)  |  Progressive (14)  |  Property (96)  |  Rapidly (11)  |  Real (102)  |  Relation (98)  |  Religious (45)  |  Revolution (59)  |  Rise (64)  |  Room (32)  |  Same (107)  |  Sense (258)  |  Set (72)  |  Short (35)  |  Social (95)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (195)  |  Solution (175)  |  Solve (45)  |  Stage (43)  |  Structure (193)  |  Sum (31)  |  Task (71)  |  Think (249)  |  Time (491)  |  Total (30)  |  Transform (22)  |  Transformation (48)  |  Turn (93)  |  Womb (13)  |  Work (493)

Most impediments to scientific understanding are conceptual locks, not factual lacks. Most difficult to dislodge are those biases that escape our scrutiny because they seem so obviously, even ineluctably, just. We know ourselves best and tend to view other creatures as mirrors of our own constitution and social arrangements. (Aristotle, and nearly two millennia of successors, designated the large bee that leads the swarm as a king.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (146)  |  Arrangement (47)  |  Bee (21)  |  Best (143)  |  Conceptual (8)  |  Constitution (27)  |  Creature (142)  |  Difficult (73)  |  Escape (37)  |  Factual (8)  |  Impediment (7)  |  Ineluctably (2)  |  King (26)  |  Know (394)  |  Lack (56)  |  Large (96)  |  Lead (120)  |  Lock (10)  |  Millennia (4)  |  Mirror (23)  |  Nearly (20)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Ourselves (45)  |  Scientific (181)  |  Scrutiny (13)  |  Seem (109)  |  Social (95)  |  Successor (6)  |  Swarm (11)  |  Tend (27)  |  Understand (223)  |  View (131)

One should not wrongly reify “cause” and “effect,” as the natural scientists do (and whoever, like them, now “naturalizes” in his thinking), according to the prevailing mechanical doltishness which makes the cause press and push until it “effects” its end; one should use “cause” and “effect” only as pure concepts, that is to say, as conventional fictions for the purpose of designation and communication—not for explanation.
In Beyond Good and Evil (1886). Trans. W. Kaufmann (ed.), Basic Writings of Nietzsche (1968), 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause And Effect (11)  |  Fiction (17)

The full impact of the Lobatchewskian method of challenging axioms has probably yet to be felt. It is no exaggeration to call Lobatchewsky the Copernicus of Geometry [as did Clifford], for geometry is only a part of the vaster domain which he renovated; it might even be just to designate him as a Copernicus of all thought.
From a page of quotations, without citations, in G.E. Martin The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1975), 225. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (26)  |  Challenge (47)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (45)  |  Domain (21)  |  Exaggeration (7)  |  Geometry (100)  |  Impact (22)  |  Method (159)  |  Renovation (2)  |  Thought (400)

The tendency of the sciences has long been an increasing proclivity of separation and dismemberment … The mathematician turns away from the chemist; the chemist from the naturalist; the mathematician, left to himself divides himself into a pure mathematician and a mixed mathematician, who soon part company … And thus science, even mere physical science, loses all traces of unity. A curious illustration of this result may be observed in the want of any name by which we can designate the students of the knowledge of the material world collectively. We are informed that this difficulty was felt very oppressively by the members of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, at their meetings at York, Oxford and Cambridge, in the last three summers. There was no general term by which these gentlemen could describe themselves with reference to their pursuits … some ingenious gentleman [William Whewell] proposed that, by analogy with artist, they might form Scientist, and added that there could be no scruple … when we have words such as sciolist, economist, and atheist—but this was not generally palatable.
In Review of Mrs Somerville, 'On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences', The Quarterly Review (1834), 51, 58-61.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (46)  |  Artist (48)  |  Atheist (13)  |  Chemist (81)  |  Description (74)  |  Difficulty (117)  |  Dismemberment (2)  |  Division (27)  |  Economist (13)  |  Illustration (24)  |  Ingenious (20)  |  Knowledge (1148)  |  Mathematician (178)  |  Name (124)  |  Naturalist (50)  |  Palatable (2)  |  Physical Science (56)  |  Proposal (10)  |  Scientist (459)  |  Term (89)  |  William Whewell (55)  |  Word (235)

The usual designation of the magnitude scale to my name does less than justice to the great part that Dr. Gutenberg played in extending the scale to apply to earthquakes in all parts of the world.
From interview with Henry Spall, as in an abridged version of Earthquake Information Bulletin (Jan-Feb 1980), 12, No. 1, that is on the USGS website.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (40)  |  Earthquake (27)  |  Extending (3)  |  Great (355)  |  Beno Gutenberg (2)  |  Justice (26)  |  Less (72)  |  Magnitude (22)  |  Name (124)  |  Richter Scale (3)  |  World (746)

The word, “Vitamine,” served as a catchword which meant something even to the uninitiated, and it was not by mere accident that just at that time, research developed so markedly in this direction. Our view as to the fortunate choice of this name is strengthened, on the one hand, because it has become popular (and a badly chosen catchword, like a folksong without feeling, can never become popular), and on the other, because of the untiring efforts of other workers to introduce a varied nomenclature, for example, “accessory food factors, food hormones, water-soluble B and fat-soluble A, nutramine, and auximone” (for plants). Some of these designations are certainly not better, while others are much worse than “Vitamine.”
The Vitamines translated by Harry Ennis Dubin (1922), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Catchword (3)  |  Choice (72)  |  Nomencalture (3)  |  Popularity (2)  |  Vitamin (11)

We might call it the transformational content of the body … But as I hold it better to borrow terms for important magnitudes from the ancient languages, so that they may be adopted unchanged in all modern languages, I propose to call [it] the entropy of the body, from the Greek word “trope” for “transformation” I have intentionally formed the word “entropy” to be as similar as possible to the word “energy”; for the two magnitudes to be denoted by these words are so nearly allied in their physical meanings, that a certain similarity in designation appears to be desirable.
In 'The Bulldog: A Profile of Ludwig Boltzmann', The American Scholar (1 Jan 1999), 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (206)  |  Borrow (12)  |  Content (41)  |  Energy (200)  |  Entropy (41)  |  Intentionally (3)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Nomenclature (132)  |  Similarity (17)  |  Term (89)  |  Transformation (48)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.