Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Pound

Pound Quotes (14 quotes)

Question: If you were to pour a pound of molten lead and a pound of molten iron, each at the temperature of its melting point, upon two blocks of ice, which would melt the most ice, and why?
Answer: This question relates to diathermancy. Iron is said to be a diathermanous body (from dia, through, and thermo, I heat), meaning that it gets heated through and through, and accordingly contains a large quantity of real heat. Lead is said to be an athermanous body (from a, privative, and thermo, I heat), meaning that it gets heated secretly or in a latent manner. Hence the answer to this question depends on which will get the best of it, the real heat of the iron or the latent heat of the lead. Probably the iron will smite furthest into the ice, as molten iron is white and glowing, while melted lead is dull.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 180-1, Question 14. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Best (459)  |  Block (12)  |  Body (537)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Dull (54)  |  Examination (98)  |  Heat (174)  |  Howler (15)  |  Ice (54)  |  Iron (96)  |  Large (394)  |  Latent (12)  |  Latent Heat (7)  |  Lead (384)  |  Manner (58)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Melting Point (3)  |  Molten (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Point (580)  |  Pour (10)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Secret (194)  |  Smite (4)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  White (127)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

A pound of energy with an ounce of talent will achieve greater results than a pound of talent with an ounce of energy.
In Getting on in the World; Or, Hints on Success in Life (1873), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Energy (344)  |  Greater (288)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Ounce (8)  |  Result (677)  |  Talent (94)  |  Will (2355)

An ounce of pretension is worth a pound of manure.
Anonymous
In Robert Harling, Steel Magnolias (1988), 18. The play was first presented on 22 Mar 1987.
Science quotes on:  |  Manure (8)  |  Ounce (8)  |  Pretension (6)  |  Worth (169)

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
Perhaps an older adage, but an example of its use appears in Pennsylvania Gazette (4 Feb 1734-5), about fire prevention, including taking care, moving live coals from a fireplace between rooms, for safety in a closed warming-pan. A midnight fire from a spilled ember might set your stairs on fire: “You may be forced, as I once was, to leap out of your windows, and hazard your necks to avoid being over-roasted.” As cited in Benjamin Franklin and J. Sparks (ed.), The Works of Benjamin Franklin (1840), Vol. 1, 134, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (122)  |  Ounce (8)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Proverb (27)  |  Worth (169)

Bottom trawling is a ghastly process that brings untold damage to sea beds that support ocean life. It’s akin to using a bulldozer to catch a butterfly, destroying a whole ecosystem for the sake of a few pounds of protein. We wouldn’t do this on land, so why do it in the oceans?
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Bulldozer (6)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Catch (31)  |  Damage (34)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ecosystem (24)  |  Environment (216)  |  Ghastly (5)  |  Land (115)  |  Life (1795)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Process (423)  |  Protein (54)  |  Sake (58)  |  Sea (308)  |  Support (147)  |  Trawling (6)  |  Untold (6)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)

Get rid of every pound of material you can do without; put to yourself the question, ‘What business has this to be there?’
As quoted in Joseph Wickham Roe, English and American Tool Builders (1916), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (149)  |  Do (1908)  |  Material (353)  |  Question (621)  |  Rid (13)

He [Lord Bacon] appears to have been utterly ignorant of the discoveries which had just been made by Kepler’s calculations … he does not say a word about Napier’s Logarithms, which had been published only nine years before and reprinted more than once in the interval. He complained that no considerable advance had been made in Geometry beyond Euclid, without taking any notice of what had been done by Archimedes and Apollonius. He saw the importance of determining accurately the specific gravities of different substances, and himself attempted to form a table of them by a rude process of his own, without knowing of the more scientific though still imperfect methods previously employed by Archimedes, Ghetaldus and Porta. He speaks of the εὕρηκα of Archimedes in a manner which implies that he did not clearly appreciate either the problem to be solved or the principles upon which the solution depended. In reviewing the progress of Mechanics, he makes no mention either of Archimedes, or Stevinus, Galileo, Guldinus, or Ghetaldus. He makes no allusion to the theory of Equilibrium. He observes that a ball of one pound weight will fall nearly as fast through the air as a ball of two, without alluding to the theory of acceleration of falling bodies, which had been made known by Galileo more than thirty years before. He proposed an inquiry with regard to the lever,—namely, whether in a balance with arms of different length but equal weight the distance from the fulcrum has any effect upon the inclination—though the theory of the lever was as well understood in his own time as it is now. … He speaks of the poles of the earth as fixed, in a manner which seems to imply that he was not acquainted with the precession of the equinoxes; and in another place, of the north pole being above and the south pole below, as a reason why in our hemisphere the north winds predominate over the south.
From Spedding’s 'Preface' to De Interpretations Naturae Proœmium, in The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 3, 511-512. [Note: the Greek word “εὕρηκα” is “Eureka” —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  Apollonius (6)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Balance (77)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Complain (8)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Depend (228)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Equinox (5)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Eureka (11)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fast (45)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Fulcrum (3)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hemisphere (5)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Known (454)  |  Length (23)  |  Lever (13)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mention (82)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  John Napier (3)  |  Nearly (137)  |  North Pole (5)  |  North Wind (2)  |  Notice (77)  |  Observe (168)  |  Pole (46)  |  Precession (4)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  South (38)  |  South Pole (3)  |  Speak (232)  |  Specific (95)  |  Specific Gravity (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Table (104)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Weight (134)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

Meat reared on land matures relatively quickly, and it takes only a few pounds of plants to produce a pound of meat. Tuna take 10 to 14 years to mature, require thousands of pounds of food to develop, and we’re hunting them to the point of extinction.
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Develop (268)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Food (199)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Land (115)  |  Mature (16)  |  Meat (16)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Plant (294)  |  Point (580)  |  Produce (104)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Require (219)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tuna (4)  |  Year (933)

Of all the constituents of the human body, bone is the hardest, the driest, the earthiest, and the coldest; and, excepting only the teeth, it is devoid of sensation. God, the great Creator of all things, formed its substance to this specification with good reason, intending it to be like a foundation for the whole body; for in the fabric of the human body bones perform the same function as do walls and beams in houses, poles in tents, and keels and ribs in boats.
Bones Differentiated by Function
Some bones, by reason of their strength, form as it were props for the body; these include the tibia, the femur, the spinal vertebrae, and most of the bony framework. Others are like bastions, defense walls, and ramparts, affording natural protection to other parts; examples are the skull, the spines and transverse processes of the vertebrae, the breast bone, the ribs. Others stand in front of the joints between certain bones, to ensure that the joint does not move too loosely or bend to too acute an angle. This is the function of the tiny bones, likened by the professors of anatomy to the size of a sesame seed, which are attached to the second internode of the thumb, the first internode of the other four fingers and the first internodes of the five toes. The teeth, on the other hand, serve specifically to cut, crush, pound and grind our food, and similarly the two ossicles in the organ of hearing perform a specifically auditory function.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, 1, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in 'Nature of Bone; Function of Bones', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Angle (20)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Auditory (2)  |  Bastion (3)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bend (12)  |  Boat (16)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Breast (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Creator (91)  |  Crush (18)  |  Cut (114)  |  Defense (23)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Driest (2)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Exception (73)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Finger (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Framework (31)  |  Function (228)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hardest (3)  |  Hearing (49)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Joint (31)  |  Keel (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Pole (46)  |  Process (423)  |  Professor (128)  |  Prop (6)  |  Protection (36)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rib (6)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Serve (59)  |  Sesame (2)  |  Size (60)  |  Skull (5)  |  Specification (7)  |  Spine (9)  |  Stand (274)  |  Strength (126)  |  Substance (248)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Tent (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Toe (7)  |  Transverse (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Vertebra (4)  |  Wall (67)  |  Whole (738)

Our discombobulated lives need to sink some anchors in numerical stability. (I still have not recovered from the rise of a pound of hamburger at the supermarket to more than a buck.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anchor (10)  |  Buck (2)  |  Hamburger (2)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Recover (11)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sink (37)  |  Stability (25)  |  Still (613)

The French kilogramme = 15,433.6 grains, or 2.679 lbs. Troy or 2.205 lbs. avoirdupoids.
In Elementary Chemistry, Theoretical and Practical (1854), 104. [Note: this shows, at the time of writing, the grain was the preferred unit of mass.]
Science quotes on:  |  France (27)  |  Grain (50)  |  Kilogram (3)  |  Troy (3)

These white crystals is what’s left of the human body when you take the water away, which makes up 96% of our bodies. Without water, we’re all just three or four pounds of chemicals.
In TV episode, spoken by character Dr. McCoy, 'The Omega Glory', Star Trek (1968).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Water (481)  |  White (127)

We have one of his [Newton’s] college memorandum-books, which is highly interesting. The following are some of the entries: “Drills, gravers, a hone, a hammer, and a mandril, 5s.;” “a magnet, 16s.;” “compasses, 2s.;” “glass bubbles, 4s.;” “at the tavern several other times, £1;” “spent on my cousin, 12s.;” “on other acquaintances, 10s.;” “Philosophical Intelligences, 9s. 6d.;” “lost at cards twice, 15s.;” “at the tavern twice, 3s. 6d.;” “to three prisms, £3;” “four ounces of putty, 1s. 4d.;” “Bacon’s Miscellanies, 1s. 6d.;” “a bible binding, 3s.;” “for oranges to my sister, 4s. 2d.;” “for aquafortis, sublimate, oyle pink, fine silver, antimony, vinegar, spirit of wine, white lead, salt of tartar, £2;” “Theatrum chemicum, £1 8s.”
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 255.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Antimony (7)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Bible (91)  |  Binding (9)  |  Book (392)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Card (4)  |  College (66)  |  Compass (34)  |  Cousin (12)  |  Drill (11)  |  Glass (92)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Hone (3)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lose (159)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Orange (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ounce (8)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Prism (7)  |  Putty (2)  |  Salt (46)  |  Silver (46)  |  Sister (8)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Sublimate (4)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vinegar (7)  |  White (127)  |  Wine (38)

When first discovered, [aluminum was a precious metal that] cost about 270 dollars a pound; then it fell to 27 dollars, and today a pound of aluminum is worth about nine dollars.
Answering the question, “Is not aluminum rather expensive?” to a fictional moon shot committee. In Jules Verne, Aaron Parrett (ed.) and Edward Roth (trans.), From the Earth to the Moon (1865, 2005), 50. In the original French edition, the costs were given in francs as about 1500, 150 and 48.75, respectively.
Science quotes on:  |  Aluminum (6)  |  Cost (86)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Expensive (10)  |  First (1283)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Precious (41)  |  Today (314)  |  Worth (169)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.