Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Eureka

Eureka Quotes (11 quotes)

Eureka! Eureka!
I have found it!
Attributed. Supposed to have been his cry, jumping naked from his bath and running in the streets, excited by a discovery about water displacement that solved a problem about the purity of a gold crown. Archimedes probably never uttered the phrase in that way. We have no written record by Archimedes about the Eureka! story. The earliest reference is by Vitruvius, a Roman writer, in the introduction of his ninth book of architecture, c. 1st Century B.C. Being nearly 200 years after the presumed event, his story of Archimedes is likely exaggerated. See the Vitruvius quote here.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (780)

Archimedes said Eureka,
Cos in English he weren't too aversed in,
when he discovered that the volume of a body in the bath,
is equal to the stuff it is immersed in,
That is the law of displacement,
Thats why ships don't sink,
Its a shame he weren't around in 1912,
The Titanic would have made him think.
From lyrics of song Sod’s Law.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Bath (10)  |  Body (537)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Displacement (9)  |  English (35)  |  Equal (83)  |  Immersion (4)  |  Law (894)  |  Shame (14)  |  Ship (62)  |  Sink (37)  |  Stuff (21)  |  Think (1086)  |  Titanic (4)  |  Volume (19)  |  Why (491)

Archimedes, who combined a genius for mathematics with a physical insight, must rank with Newton, who lived nearly two thousand years later, as one of the founders of mathematical physics. … The day (when having discovered his famous principle of hydrostatics he ran through the streets shouting Eureka! Eureka!) ought to be celebrated as the birthday of mathematical physics; the science came of age when Newton sat in his orchard.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Birthday (8)  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Discover (553)  |  Famous (10)  |  Founder (26)  |  Genius (284)  |  Insight (102)  |  Later (18)  |  Lived (3)  |  Mathematical Physics (11)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Orchard (4)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Principle (507)  |  Rank (67)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shout (25)  |  Sit (48)  |  Street (23)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Year (933)

ARCHIMEDES. On hearing his name, shout “Eureka!” Or else: “Give me a fulcrum and I will move the world”. There is also Archimedes’ screw, but you are not expected to know what that is.
The Dictionary of Accepted Ideas (1881), trans. Jaques Barzun (1968), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fulcrum (3)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Know (1518)  |  Move (216)  |  Name (333)  |  Quip (80)  |  Screw (17)  |  Shout (25)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

He [Lord Bacon] appears to have been utterly ignorant of the discoveries which had just been made by Kepler’s calculations … he does not say a word about Napier’s Logarithms, which had been published only nine years before and reprinted more than once in the interval. He complained that no considerable advance had been made in Geometry beyond Euclid, without taking any notice of what had been done by Archimedes and Apollonius. He saw the importance of determining accurately the specific gravities of different substances, and himself attempted to form a table of them by a rude process of his own, without knowing of the more scientific though still imperfect methods previously employed by Archimedes, Ghetaldus and Porta. He speaks of the εὕρηκα of Archimedes in a manner which implies that he did not clearly appreciate either the problem to be solved or the principles upon which the solution depended. In reviewing the progress of Mechanics, he makes no mention either of Archimedes, or Stevinus, Galileo, Guldinus, or Ghetaldus. He makes no allusion to the theory of Equilibrium. He observes that a ball of one pound weight will fall nearly as fast through the air as a ball of two, without alluding to the theory of acceleration of falling bodies, which had been made known by Galileo more than thirty years before. He proposed an inquiry with regard to the lever,—namely, whether in a balance with arms of different length but equal weight the distance from the fulcrum has any effect upon the inclination—though the theory of the lever was as well understood in his own time as it is now. … He speaks of the poles of the earth as fixed, in a manner which seems to imply that he was not acquainted with the precession of the equinoxes; and in another place, of the north pole being above and the south pole below, as a reason why in our hemisphere the north winds predominate over the south.
From Spedding’s 'Preface' to De Interpretations Naturae Prośmium, in The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 3, 511-512. [Note: the Greek word “εὕρηκα” is “Eureka” —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  Apollonius (6)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Balance (77)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Complain (8)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Depend (228)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Equinox (5)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fast (45)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Fulcrum (3)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hemisphere (5)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Known (454)  |  Length (23)  |  Lever (13)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mention (82)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  John Napier (3)  |  Nearly (137)  |  North Pole (5)  |  North Wind (2)  |  Notice (77)  |  Observe (168)  |  Pole (46)  |  Pound (14)  |  Precession (4)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  South (38)  |  South Pole (3)  |  Speak (232)  |  Specific (95)  |  Specific Gravity (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Table (104)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Weight (134)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

Hieron asked Archimedes to discover, without damaging it, whether a certain crown or wreath was made of pure gold, or if the goldsmith had fraudulently alloyed it with some baser metal. While Archimedes was turning the problem over in his mind, he chanced to be in the bath house. There, as he was sitting in the bath, he noticed that the amount of water that was flowing over the top of it was equal in volume to that part of his body that was immersed. He saw at once a way of solving the problem. He did not delay, but in his joy leaped out of the bath. Rushing naked through the streets towards his home, he cried out in a loud voice that he had found what he sought. For, as he ran, he repeatedly shouted in Greek; “Eureka! Eurekal I’ve found it! I’ve found it!”
Vitrivius Pollio, De Architectura, ix, prologue, section 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Alloy (4)  |  Amount (151)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Ask (411)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Crown (38)  |  Delay (20)  |  Discover (553)  |  Gold (97)  |  Greek (107)  |  Home (170)  |  House (140)  |  Joy (107)  |  Leap (53)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure (291)  |  Research (664)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shout (25)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Through (849)  |  Top (96)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

I was working with these very long-chain … extended-chain polymers, where you had a lot of benzene rings in them. … Transforming a polymer solution from a liquid to a fiber requires a process called spinning. … We spun it and it spun beautifully. It [Kevlar] was very strong and very stiff—unlike anything we had made before. I knew that I had made a discovery. I didn’t shout “Eureka!” but I was very excited, as was the whole laboratory excited, and management was excited, because we were looking for something new. Something different. And this was it.
From transcript for video interview (2007, published Aug 2012), 'Stephanie Kwolek: Curiosity and the Discovery of Kevlar', in the series Women in Chemistry, on Chemical Heritage Foundation website.
Science quotes on:  |  Benzene (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Invention (369)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  Lot (151)  |  Management (21)  |  New (1216)  |  Polymer (4)  |  Process (423)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Research (664)  |  Ring (16)  |  Shout (25)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Stiff (3)  |  Strong (174)  |  Transforming (4)  |  Whole (738)

My eureka moment was in the dead of night, the early hours of the morning, on a cold, cold night, and my feet were so cold, they were aching. But when the result poured out of the charts, you just forget all that. You realize instantly how significant this is—what it is you’ve really landed on—and it’s great!
[About her discovery of the first pulsar radio signals.]
From BBC TV program, Journeys in Time and Space: Invisible Universe (28 Feb 2001).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ache (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Chart (6)  |  Cold (112)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Early (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Moment (253)  |  Morning (94)  |  Night (120)  |  Pouring (3)  |  Pulsar (3)  |  Radio (50)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Result (677)  |  Signal (27)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)

The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' (I found it!) but 'That's funny....'
In Ashton Applewhite, William R. Evans and Andrew Frothingham, And I Quote (2003), 467
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Hear (139)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Science (3879)

[I doubt that in today's world, I and Francis Crick would ever have had our Eureka moment.] I recently went to my staircase at Clare College, Cambridge and there were women there! he said, with an enormous measure of retrospective sexual frustration. There have been a lot of convincing studies recently about the loss of productivity in the Western male. It may be that entertainment culture now is so engaging that it keeps people satisfied. We didn't have that. Science was much more fun than listening to the radio. When you are 16 or 17 and in that inherently semi-lonely period when you are deciding whether to be an intellectual, many now don't bother.
(Response when asked how he thought the climate of scientific research had changed since he made his discovery of the structure of life in 1953.)
Quoted by Tim Adams in 'The New Age of Ignorance', The Observer (30 Jun 2007).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Biography (240)  |  Climate (97)  |  College (66)  |  Culture (143)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Frustration (12)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listening (25)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Loss (110)  |  Lot (151)  |  Measure (232)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Period (198)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Radio (50)  |  Research (664)  |  Response (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Western (45)  |  World (1774)

[King Hiero II] requested Archimedes to consider [whether a crown was pure gold or alloyed with silver]. The latter, while the case was still on his mind, happened to go to the bath, and on getting into a tub observed that the more his body sank into it the more water ran out over the tub. As this pointed out the way to explain the case in question, without a moment’s delay, and transported with joy, he jumped out of the tub and rushed home naked, crying with a loud voice that he had found what he was seeking; for as he ran he shouted repeatedly in Greek, “Eὕρηκα, εὕρηκα.”
Vitruvius
This famous anecdote, being written about two centuries after Archimedes, is of questionable authenticity, but Vitruvius provided the origin of the story as we know it. In De Architectura, Book 9, Introduction, Sec. 10. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 254. Also seen translated as “While Archimedes was turning the problem over, he chanced to come to the place of bathing, and there, as he was sitting down in the tub, he noticed that the amount of water which flowed over the tub was equal to the amount by which his body was immersed. This showed him a means of solving the problem. … In his joy, he leapt out of the tub and, rushing naked towards his home, he cried out with a loud voice that he had found what he sought.” In Ivor Bulmer-Thomas, Selections Illustrating the History of Greek Mathematics (1939), 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alloy (4)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Bath (10)  |  Body (537)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crown (38)  |  Delay (20)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Gold (97)  |  Greek (107)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Home (170)  |  Joy (107)  |  Jump (29)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Naked (10)  |  Observed (149)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure (291)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Shout (25)  |  Silver (46)  |  Still (613)  |  Transport (30)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.