Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Pick

Pick Quotes (14 quotes)

...man will occasionally stumble over the truth, but usually manages to pick himself up, walk over or around it, and carry on.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Carry (35)  |  Manage (10)  |  Occasionally (3)  |  Stumble (11)  |  Truth (750)  |  Usually (20)  |  Walk (56)

A fair number of people who go on to major in astronomy have decided on it certainly by the time they leave junior high, if not during junior high. I think it’s somewhat unusual that way. I think most children pick their field quite a bit later, but astronomy seems to catch early, and if it does, it sticks.
From interview by Rebecca Wright, 'Oral History Transcript' (15 Sep 2000), on NASA website.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Career (54)  |  Child (189)  |  Decide (25)  |  Early (39)  |  Field (119)  |  Junior High (3)  |  Major (24)

An ignorant or half-informed teacher may present science as an accumulation of unconnected facts. … To teach in that fashion is like going to the tree of science with its glorious fruit in order to pick up a handful of the dry fallen leaves from the ground.
In Inaugural Presidential Address (9 Sep 1885) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Aberdeen, Scotland, 'Relations of Science to the Public Weal', Report to the Fifty-Fifth Meeting of the British Association (1886), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (29)  |  Dry (12)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fallen (2)  |  Fashion (24)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Glorious (17)  |  Ground (63)  |  Handful (6)  |  Ignorant (27)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Present (103)  |  Science (1699)  |  Teach (102)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Tree (143)  |  Unconnected (3)

If I had my life to live over … I would pick more daisies.
Title and last line from poem published with a misspelled last name of “Stair”. This name error is associated with various viral copies around the net. This poem form was published in 'If I Had My Life to Live Over', Family Circle (27 Mar 1978). Reprinted in Byron Crawford, Kentucky Stories (2001), 1, which also details the name confusion. This version is shortened from the previously published prose by Don Herald in Reader’s Digest (Oct 1953).
Science quotes on:  |  Daisy (3)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)

In 1847 I gave an address at Newton, Mass., before a Teachers’ Institute conducted by Horace Mann. My subject was grasshoppers. I passed around a large jar of these insects, and made every teacher take one and hold it while I was speaking. If any one dropped the insect, I stopped till he picked it up. This was at that time a great innovation, and excited much laughter and derision. There can be no true progress in the teaching of natural science until such methods become general.
Science quotes on:  |  Address (7)  |  Conducting (2)  |  Derision (6)  |  Drop (27)  |  Excitement (33)  |  General (92)  |  Grasshopper (4)  |  Great (300)  |  Hold (56)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Insect (57)  |  Institute (7)  |  Jar (9)  |  Laughter (22)  |  Horace Mann (16)  |  Method (154)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Pass (60)  |  Progress (317)  |  Speak (49)  |  Stop (56)  |  Subject (129)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Time (439)  |  True (120)

In a sense [for the Copenhagen Interpretation], the observer picks what happens. One of the unsolved questions is whether the observer’s mind or will somehow determines the choice, or whether it is simply a case of sticking in a thumb and pulling out a plum at random.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Case (64)  |  Choice (64)  |  Copenhagen (3)  |  Determine (45)  |  Happen (63)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Mind (544)  |  Observer (33)  |  Plum (3)  |  Pull (11)  |  Question (315)  |  Random (21)  |  Sense (240)  |  Simply (34)  |  Stick (19)  |  Thumb (8)  |  Unsolved (7)

It often seems to me as if History was like a child’s box of letters, with which we can spell any word we please. We have only to pick out such letters as we want, arrange them as we like, and say nothing about those which do not suit our purpose.
Lecture delivered to the Royal Institution (5 Feb 1864), 'On the Science of History'. Collected in Notices of the Proceedings at the Meetings of the Members of the Royal Institution of Great Britain with Abstracts of the Discourses (1866), Vol. 4, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrange (15)  |  Box (8)  |  Child (189)  |  History (302)  |  Letter (36)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Please (10)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Spell (7)  |  Want (120)  |  Word (221)

No one had ever picked my brains about influenza so expertly as he did.
[Recalling when had met young Jonas Salk, Ann Arbor (1943).]
In M. Burnet, Changing Patterns: an Atypical Autobiography (1968), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (181)  |  Expert (42)  |  Influenza (3)  |  Jonas Salk (13)

No other explanation of living forms is allowed than heredity, and any which is founded on another basis must be rejected. The present fashion requires that even the smallest and most indifferent inquiry must be dressed in phylogenetic costume, and whilst in former centuries authors professed to read in every natural detail some intention of the creator mundi, modern scientists have the aspiration to pick out from every occasional observation a fragment of the ancestral history of the living world.
'On the Principles of Animal Morphology', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (2 Apr 1888), 15, 294. Original as Letter to Mr John Murray, communicated to the Society by Professor Sir William Turner. Page given as in collected volume published 1889.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspiration (19)  |  Basis (60)  |  Detail (65)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fashion (24)  |  Form (210)  |  Founded (10)  |  Fragment (24)  |  Heredity (51)  |  History (302)  |  Indifferent (9)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Intention (25)  |  Life (917)  |  Modern (104)  |  Natural (128)  |  Observation (418)  |  Occasional (10)  |  Read (83)  |  Reject (21)  |  Scientist (447)

No politics, no committees, no reports, no referees, no interviews – just highly motivated people picked by a few men of good judgment.
[Describing the compelling ideas of Max Perutz on how best to nurture research.]
Quoted in Andrew Jack, "An Acute Talent for Innovation", Financial Times (1 Feb 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Committee (8)  |  Compelling (7)  |  Idea (440)  |  Interview (3)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Motivation (21)  |  Nurture (12)  |  Max Ferdinand Perutz (13)  |  Politics (77)  |  Referee (3)  |  Report (31)  |  Research (517)  |  Selection (27)

One of the most important choices any researcher makes is picking a significant topic to study. If you choose the right problem, you get important results that transform our perception of the underlying structure of the universe. If you don’t choose the right problem, you may work very hard but only get an interesting result.
Unverified - source citation needed. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (35)  |  Important (124)  |  Interesting (38)  |  Perception (53)  |  Problem (362)  |  Researcher (17)  |  Result (250)  |  Right (144)  |  Significant (26)  |  Structure (191)  |  Study (331)  |  Topic (6)  |  Transform (20)  |  Universe (563)  |  Work (457)

Science and common sense differ as cultivated fruits differ from wild fruits.
Science sows its seeds of inquiry, and gathers the fruit.
Common sense picks the fruit, such as it, is by the wayside.
Common sense has no fields or orchards of knowledge.
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), lvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Cultivate (9)  |  Difference (208)  |  Field (119)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Gather (29)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Orchard (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seed (52)  |  Sow (10)  |  Wayside (4)  |  Wild (39)

Lord Byron Quote: Newton declared himself “like a youth Picking up shells by the great ocean—Truth.”
Background of ocean and rocky outcrop with kelp on sandy shore in foreground, at Channel Islands NMS, California. , Photo by Claire Fackler, NOAA (source)
Socrates said, our only knowledge was
“To know that nothing could be known;” a pleasant
Science enough, which levels to an ass
Each Man of Wisdom, future, past, or present.
Newton, (that Proverb of the Mind,) alas!
Declared, with all his grand discoveries recent,
That he himself felt only “like a youth
Picking up shells by the great Ocean—Truth.”
From poem, 'Don Juan,' (1822), canto 7, verse V. In Lord Byron, Don Juan: Cantos VI, VII and VIII (1823), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Ass (3)  |  Declaration (5)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Future (229)  |  Grand (15)  |  Great (300)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Mind (544)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Past (109)  |  Pleasant (16)  |  Present (103)  |  Proverb (23)  |  Recent (23)  |  Shell (35)  |  Socrates (14)  |  Truth (750)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Youth (57)

When we try to pick out anything by itself we find it hitched to everything else in the universe ... The whole wilderness is unity and interrelation, is alive and familiar, full of humanity. The very stones seem talkative, sympathetic, brotherly.
John Muir
In My First Summer in the Sierra (1911), 211 and 319. Based on Muir's original journals and sketches of his 1869 stay in the Sierra.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (38)  |  Brother (16)  |  Everything (120)  |  Familiar (22)  |  Hitch (2)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Interrelation (6)  |  Stone (57)  |  Sympathy (15)  |  Talk (61)  |  Unity (43)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wilderness (28)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.