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Science Quotes by Dictionary (3 quotes)

Engineering is the application of scientific and mathematical principles to practical ends such as the design, manufacture, and operation of efficient and economical structures, machines, processes, and systems.
— Dictionary
In Bernice Zeldin Schacter, Issues and Dilemmas of Biotechnology: A Reference Guide (1999), 1, citing the American Heritage Dictionary, 2nd College Edition.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Design (92)  |  Economical (7)  |  Efficient (20)  |  End (141)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Machine (133)  |  Manufacture (12)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Operation (96)  |  Practical (93)  |  Principle (228)  |  Process (201)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Structure (191)  |  System (141)

Gyroscope, n.: A wheel or disk mounted to spin rapidly about an axis and also free to rotate about one or both of two axes perpendicular to each other and the axis of spin so that a rotation of one of the two mutually perpendicular axes results from application of torque to the other when the wheel is spinning and so that the entire apparatus offers considerable opposition depending on the angular momentum to any torque that would change the direction of the axis of spin.
— Dictionary
Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary (8th Ed., 1973), 513. (Webmaster comments: A definition which is perfectly easy to understand. Right?)
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Axis (8)  |  Definition (152)  |  Rotate (5)  |  Spin (8)  |  Wheel (13)

Science can be defined as “the observation, identification, description, experimental investigation and theoretical explanation of natural phenomena.”
— Dictionary
In Bernice Zeldin Schacter, Issues and Dilemmas of Biotechnology: A Reference Guide (1999), 1, citing the American Heritage Dictionary, 2nd College Edition.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (152)  |  Description (72)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Identification (11)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Science (1699)  |  Theoretical (10)



Quotes by others about Dictionary (10)

Learning is the dictionary, but sense the grammar of science.
The Works of Laurence Sterne (1814), Vol. 6, 347.
Science quotes on:  |  Grammar (10)  |  Learning (174)  |  Science (1699)

Facts are not science—as the dictionary is not literature.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (609)  |  Literature (64)  |  Science (1699)

One cannot explain words without making incursions into the sciences themselves, as is evident from dictionaries; and, conversely, one cannot present a science without at the same time defining its terms.
'Of the Division of the Sciences' (1765), Book 4, Chap. 21, in New Essays on Human Understanding, trans. and ed. Peter Remnal (1981), 522.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (152)  |  Term (87)  |  Word (221)

In assessing Audubon, whose firm grip on the popular imagination has scarcely lessened since 1826, we must as historians of science seriously ask who would remember him if he had not been an artist of great imagination and flair. ... The chances seem to be very poor that had he not been an artist, he would be an unlikely candidate for a dictionary of scientific biography, if remembered to science at all.
In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1972), Vol. 1, 331.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (46)  |  John James Audubon (9)  |  Biography (227)  |  Candidate (2)  |  Firm (19)  |  Grip (8)  |  Historian (30)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Remember (53)  |  Unlikely (12)

[Instead of collecting stamps, he collected dictionaries and encyclopaedias:] Because you can learn more from them.
'Dr Linus Pauling, Atomic Architect', Science Illustrated (1948), 3, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Collection (38)  |  Encyclopedia (5)  |  Learning (174)  |  Stamp (14)

Once early in the morning, at two or three in the morning, when the master was asleep, the books in the library began to quarrel with each other as to which was the king of the library. The dictionary contended quite angrily that he was the master of the library because without words there would be no communication at all. The book of science argued stridently that he was the master of the library for without science there would have been no printing press or any of the other wonders of the world. The book of poetry claimed that he was the king, the master of the library, because he gave surcease and calm to his master when he was troubled. The books of philosophy, the economic books, all put in their claims, and the clamor was great and the noise at its height when a small low voice was heard from an old brown book lying in the center of the table and the voice said, “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.” And all of the noise and the clamor in the library ceased, and there was a hush in the library, for all of the books knew who the real master of the library was.
'Ministers of Justice', address delivered to the Eighty-Second Annual Convention of the Tennessee Bar Association at Gatlinburg (5 Jun 1963). In Tennessee Law Review (Fall 1963), 31, No. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Anger (14)  |  Bible (83)  |  Book (181)  |  Calm (13)  |  Cease (23)  |  Claim (52)  |  Clamor (7)  |  Communication (58)  |  Economics (30)  |  King (23)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Library (37)  |  Lord (12)  |  Master (55)  |  Noise (24)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Printing Press (2)  |  Quarrel (9)  |  Science (1699)  |  Shepherd (5)  |  Voice (41)  |  Wonder (134)  |  Word (221)  |  World (667)

One dictionary that I consulted remarks that “natural history” now commonly means the study of animals and plants “in a popular and superficial way,” meaning popular and superficial to be equally damning adjectives. This is related to the current tendency in the biological sciences to label every subdivision of science with a name derived from the Greek. “Ecology” is erudite and profound; while “natural history” is popular and superficial. Though, as far as I can see, both labels apply to just about the same package of goods.
In The Nature of Natural History (1961, 2014), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Biology (150)  |  Common (92)  |  Current (43)  |  Derivation (12)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Equal (53)  |  Goods (6)  |  Greek (46)  |  Label (11)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Name (118)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Package (5)  |  Plant (173)  |  Popular (21)  |  Profound (46)  |  Related (5)  |  Similarity (17)  |  Study (331)  |  Subdivision (2)  |  Superficial (7)  |  Tendency (40)

Statistical accounts are to be referred to as a dictionary by men of riper years, and by young men as a grammar, to teach them the relations and proportions of different statistical subjects, and to imprint them on the mind at a time when the memory is capable of being impressed in a lasting and durable manner, thereby laying the foundation for accurate and valuable knowledge.
In The Statistical Breviary: Shewing, on a Principle Entirely New, the Resources of Every State and Kingdom in Europe (1801), 5-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Accurate (21)  |  Capability (35)  |  Difference (208)  |  Durable (2)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Grammar (10)  |  Imprint (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lasting (7)  |  Manner (35)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mind (544)  |  Proportion (47)  |  Reference (17)  |  Relation (96)  |  Ripe (2)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Subject (129)  |  Teach (102)  |  Value (180)  |  Year (214)  |  Youth (57)

The dictionary is the only place where success comes before work.
Seen attributed to Mark Twain, likely falsely, because the quotation with that wording is not found in complilations of his work. On the Quote Investigator website, possible precursors are listed. The earliest QI found is from a Newcastle, Pennsylvania, newspaper (1925): “One way to find success without working for it is to look it up in the dictionary.” A closer match found by QI is in a column, 'The Press Box', by Stubby Currence in the Bluefield, West Virginia newspaper, Bluefield Daily Telegraph (1935): “BUFF SAYS: “The dictionary is the only place where you come to SUCCESS before you get to WORK.” It is unclear if the quip was in circulation earlier, and merely recited in these examples. Vince Lombardi used a similar wording much later.
Science quotes on:  |  Place (111)  |  Success (202)  |  Work (457)

It needs no dictionary of quotations to remind me that the eyes are the windows of the soul.
In Zuleika Dobson (1911), 54-55.
Science quotes on:  |  Eye (159)  |  Need (211)  |  Quotation (5)  |  Remind (5)  |  Soul (139)  |  Window (25)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
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- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



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