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Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Cumulative

Cumulative Quotes (8 quotes)

If the Weismann idea triumphs, it will be in a sense a triumph of fatalism; for, according to it, while we may indefinitely improve the forces of our education and surroundings, and this civilizing nurture will improve the individuals of each generation, its actual effects will not be cumulative as regards the race itself, but only as regards the environment of the race; each new generation must start de novo, receiving no increment of the moral and intellectual advance made during the lifetime of its predecessors. It would follow that one deep, almost instinctive motive for a higher life would be removed if the race were only superficially benefited by its nurture, and the only possible channel of actual improvement were in the selection of the fittest chains of race plasma.
'The Present Problem of Heredity', The Atlantic Monthly (1891), 57, 363.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Chain (38)  |  Channel (17)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Education (280)  |  Effect (133)  |  Environment (138)  |  Fit (31)  |  Generation (111)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Idea (440)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Increment (2)  |  Indefinitely (9)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Life (917)  |  Lifetime (19)  |  Moral (100)  |  Motive (26)  |  Nurture (12)  |  Plasma (7)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Predecessor (18)  |  Race (76)  |  Removal (10)  |  Selection (27)  |  Superficial (7)  |  Surrounding (11)  |  Triumph (33)  |  August Weismann (8)

It is easy without any very profound logical analysis to perceive the difference between a succession of favorable deviations from the laws of chance, and on the other hand, the continuous and cumulative action of these laws. It is on the latter that the principle of Natural Selection relies.
In The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection (1930), 37. Reprinted as A Complete Variorum Edition (2003), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Analysis (123)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Deviation (11)  |  Difference (208)  |  Favorable (7)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  On The Other Hand (16)  |  Principle (228)  |  Probability (83)  |  Succession (39)

It is this ideal of progress through cumulative effort rather than through genius—progress by organised effort, progress which does not wait for some brilliant stroke, some lucky discovery, or the advent of some superman, has been the chief gift of science to social philosophy.
Address to 48th annual summer convention of the American Institute of Electriccal Engineers, Cleveland (21 Jun 1932), abridged in 'The Rτle of the Engineer', The Electrical Journal (1932), 109, 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (4)  |  Brilliant (14)  |  Chief (25)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Effort (94)  |  Genius (186)  |  Gift (47)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Lucky (6)  |  Organization (79)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Progress (317)  |  Science (1699)  |  Social (93)  |  Stroke (5)  |  Superman (3)  |  Wait (38)

No history of civilization can be tolerably complete which does not give considerable space to the explanation of scientific progress. If we had any doubts about this, it would suffice to ask ourselves what constitutes the essential difference between our and earlier civilizations. Throughout the course of history, in every period, and in almost every country, we find a small number of saints, of great artists, of men of science. The saints of to-day are not necessarily more saintly than those of a thousand years ago; our artists are not necessarily greater than those of early Greece; they are more likely to be inferior; and of course, our men of science are not necessarily more intelligent than those of old; yet one thing is certain, their knowledge is at once more extensive and more accurate. The acquisition and systematization of positive knowledge is the only human activity which is truly cumulative and progressive. Our civilization is essentially different from earlier ones, because our knowledge of the world and of ourselves is deeper, more precise, and more certain, because we have gradually learned to disentangle the forces of nature, and because we have contrived, by strict obedience to their laws, to capture them and to divert them to the gratification of our own needs.
Introduction to the History of Science (1927), Vol. 1, 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (21)  |  Acquisition (32)  |  Activity (97)  |  Capture (8)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Completion (15)  |  Country (121)  |  Difference (208)  |  Disentangle (3)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Essential (87)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Extensive (10)  |  Gratification (14)  |  Greece (7)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Law (418)  |  Men Of Science (97)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Need (211)  |  Obedience (15)  |  Precision (38)  |  Progress (317)  |  Saint (10)  |  Scientific Progress (12)

Organization is simply the means by which the acts of ordinary men can be made to add up to extraordinary results. To this idea of progress that does not wait on some lucky break, some chance discovery, or some rare stroke of genius, but instead is achieved through systematic, cumulative effort, the engineer has contributed brilliantly.
In A Professional Guide for Young Engineers (1949, 1967), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Act (80)  |  Add (26)  |  Brilliance (8)  |  Chance (122)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Effort (94)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Genius (186)  |  Idea (440)  |  Luck (25)  |  Means (109)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Organization (79)  |  Progress (317)  |  Rare (31)  |  Result (250)  |  Simply (34)  |  Stroke (5)  |  Systematic (25)  |  Waiting (9)

Science began to be powerful when it began to be cumulative, when observers began to preserve detailed records, to organize cooperating groups in order to pool and criticize their experiences.
In School and Society (1930), 31, 581.
Science quotes on:  |  Cooperation (27)  |  Criticize (4)  |  Detail (65)  |  Experience (268)  |  Group (52)  |  Observer (33)  |  Order (167)  |  Organization (79)  |  Pool (10)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Record (56)  |  Science (1699)

Theory provides the maps that turn an uncoordinated set of experiments or computer simulations into a cumulative exploration.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Computer (84)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Map (21)  |  Provide (48)  |  Set (56)  |  Simulation (6)  |  Theory (582)  |  Turn (72)

This ability to incorporate the past gives the sharpest diagnostic tool, if one asks whether a body of knowledge is a science or not. Do present practitioners have to go back to an original work of the past? Or has it been incorporated? … Science is cumulative, and embodies its past.
'The Case of Leavis and the Serious Case’, Times Literary Supplement (9 Jul 1970), 737-740. Collected in Public Affairs (1971), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Ask (99)  |  Diagnostic (2)  |  Embodying (2)  |  Incorporation (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Original (36)  |  Past (109)  |  Practitioner (12)  |  Present (103)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sharpness (4)  |  Tool (70)  |  Work (457)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
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- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



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