Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Progeny

Progeny Quotes (15 quotes)

Books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are.
In Areopagitica: A speech of Mr John Milton for the Liberty of Unlicenced printing to the Parliament of England (23 Nov 1644), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Book (394)  |  Contain (68)  |  Dead (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Life (1799)  |  Potency (10)  |  Soul (227)  |  Thing (1915)

Experiments on ornamental plants undertaken in previous years had proven that, as a rule, hybrids do not represent the form exactly intermediate between the parental strains. Although the intermediate form of some of the more striking traits, such as those relating to shape and size of leaves, pubescence of individual parts, and so forth, is indeed nearly always seen, in other cases one of the two parental traits is so preponderant that it is difficult or quite impossible, to detect the other in the hybrid. The same is true for Pisum hybrids. Each of the seven hybrid traits either resembles so closely one of the two parental traits that the other escapes detection, or is so similar to it that no certain distinction can be made. This is of great importance to the definition and classification of the forms in which the offspring of hybrids appear. In the following discussion those traits that pass into hybrid association entirely or almost entirely unchanged, thus themselves representing the traits of the hybrid, are termed dominating and those that become latent in the association, recessive. The word 'recessive' was chosen because the traits so designated recede or disappear entirely in the hybrids, but reappear unchanged in their progeny, as will be demonstrated later.
'Experiments on Plant Hybrids' (1865). In Curt Stern and Eva R. Sherwood (eds.), The Origin of Genetics: A Mendel Source Book (1966), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (46)  |  Become (815)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Classification (97)  |  Definition (224)  |  Demonstration (114)  |  Detect (44)  |  Detection (17)  |  Difficult (247)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Discussion (73)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Escape (80)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Form (960)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Great (1575)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Importance (287)  |  Impossible (253)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Latent (12)  |  Leaf (66)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pass (238)  |  Plant (295)  |  Recede (11)  |  Recessive (6)  |  Represent (154)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Rule (295)  |  Shape (73)  |  Size (60)  |  Strain (11)  |  Striking (48)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Trait (22)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2354)  |  Word (622)  |  Year (932)

If A denotes one of the two constant traits, for example, the dominating one, a the recessive, and the Aa the hybrid form in which both are united, then the expression:
A + 2Aa + a
gives the series for the progeny of plants hybrid in a pair of differing traits.
'Experiments on Plant Hybrids' (1865). In Curt Stem and Eva R. Sherwood (eds.), The Origin of Genetics: A Mendel Source Book (1966), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (494)  |  Constant (144)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Expression (176)  |  Form (960)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Plant (295)  |  Recessive (6)  |  Series (149)  |  Trait (22)  |  Two (937)

If in Germany the goddess Justitia had not the unfortunate habit of depositing the ministerial portfolios only in the cradles of her own progeny, who knows how many a German mathematician might not also have made an excellent minister.
In Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 13 (1904), 372.
Science quotes on:  |  Cradle (19)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Excellent (28)  |  German (36)  |  Goddess (7)  |  Habit (168)  |  Know (1519)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Minister (9)  |  Unfortunate (19)

If we thus go very far back to the source of the Mammalian type of organisation; it is extremely improbable that any of [his relatives shall likewise] the successors of his relations now exist,—In same manner, if we take [a man from] any large family of 12 brothers & sisters [in a state which does not increase] it will be chances against anyone [of them] having progeny living ten thousand years hence; because at present day many are relatives so that tracing back the [descen] fathers would be reduced to small percentage.—& [in] therefore the chances are excessively great against, any two of the 12, having progeny, after that distant period.
P. H. Barrett et al. (eds.), Charles Darwin's Notebooks, 1836-1844: Geology, Transmutation of the Species and Metaphysical Enquiries (1987), Notebook B, 40-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Back (391)  |  Brother (44)  |  Chance (239)  |  Exist (444)  |  Family (95)  |  Father (110)  |  Great (1575)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Increase (211)  |  Large (394)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2249)  |  Period (198)  |  Present (620)  |  Small (479)  |  State (491)  |  Successor (14)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Will (2354)  |  Year (932)

In Cairo, I secured a few grains of wheat that had slumbered for more than thirty centuries in an Egyptian tomb. As I looked at them this thought came into my mind: If one of those grains had been planted on the banks of the Nile the year after it grew, and all its lineal descendants had been planted and replanted from that time until now, its progeny would to-day be sufficiently numerous to feed the teeming millions of the world. An unbroken chain of life connects the earliest grains of wheat with the grains that we sow and reap. There is in the grain of wheat an invisible something which has power to discard the body that we see, and from earth and air fashion a new body so much like the old one that we cannot tell the one from the other.…This invisible germ of life can thus pass through three thousand resurrections.
In In His Image (1922), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (349)  |  All (4107)  |  Bank (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Century (310)  |  Chain (50)  |  Connect (125)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Discard (29)  |  DNA (77)  |  Earth (998)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Germ (53)  |  Grain (50)  |  Growth (188)  |  Invisible (64)  |  Life (1799)  |  Look (582)  |  Million (114)  |  Mind (1339)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1217)  |  Nile (4)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Old (480)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Plant (295)  |  Planting (4)  |  Power (747)  |  Reap (17)  |  Resurrection (4)  |  Secured (18)  |  See (1082)  |  Slumber (6)  |  Something (719)  |  Sow (11)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (954)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  Wheat (10)  |  World (1778)  |  Year (932)

In the year 1692, James Bernoulli, discussing the logarithmic spiral [or equiangular spiral, ρ = αθ] … shows that it reproduces itself in its evolute, its involute, and its caustics of both reflection and refraction, and then adds: “But since this marvellous spiral, by such a singular and wonderful peculiarity, pleases me so much that I can scarce be satisfied with thinking about it, I have thought that it might not be inelegantly used for a symbolic representation of various matters. For since it always produces a spiral similar to itself, indeed precisely the same spiral, however it may be involved or evolved, or reflected or refracted, it may be taken as an emblem of a progeny always in all things like the parent, simillima filia matri. Or, if it is not forbidden to compare a theorem of eternal truth to the mysteries of our faith, it may be taken as an emblem of the eternal generation of the Son, who as an image of the Father, emanating from him, as light from light, remains ὁμοούσιος with him, howsoever overshadowed. Or, if you prefer, since our spira mirabilis remains, amid all changes, most persistently itself, and exactly the same as ever, it may be used as a symbol, either of fortitude and constancy in adversity, or, of the human body, which after all its changes, even after death, will be restored to its exact and perfect self, so that, indeed, if the fashion of Archimedes were allowed in these days, I should gladly have my tombstone bear this spiral, with the motto, ‘Though changed, I arise again exactly the same, Eadem numero mutata resurgo.’”
In 'The Uses of Mathesis', Bibliotheca Sacra, Vol. 32, 516-516. [The Latin phrase “simillima filia matri” roughly translates as “the daughter resembles the mother”. “Spira mirabilis” is Latin for “marvellous spiral”. The Greek word (?µ???s???) translates as “consubstantial”, meaning of the same substance or essence (used especially of the three persons of the Trinity in Christian theology). —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Adversity (3)  |  All (4107)  |  Allow (45)  |  Archimedes (58)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bear (159)  |  Jacob Bernoulli (6)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (494)  |  Caustic (2)  |  Change (595)  |  Compare (70)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Death (391)  |  Discuss (23)  |  Emanate (2)  |  Emblem (4)  |  Eternal (111)  |  Evolute (2)  |  Evolution (593)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Fortitude (2)  |  Generation (242)  |  Gladly (2)  |  Human (1470)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Image (96)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  James (3)  |  Light (609)  |  Logarithmic (5)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (801)  |  Most (1729)  |  Motto (28)  |  Mystery (178)  |  Overshadow (2)  |  Parent (76)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Please (65)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Produce (104)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Reflection (91)  |  Refraction (11)  |  Remain (349)  |  Representation (54)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Restore (8)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Self (267)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Singular (23)  |  Son (24)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Symbol (94)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (415)  |  Thought (954)  |  Tombstone (2)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2354)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Year (932)

Language is simply alive, like an organism. We all tell each other this, in fact, when we speak of living languages, and I think we mean something more than an abstract metaphor. We mean alive. Words are the cells of language, moving the great body, on legs. Language grows and evolves, leaving fossils behind. The individual words are like different species of animals. Mutations occur. Words fuse, and then mate. Hybrid words and wild varieties or compound words are the progeny. Some mixed words are dominated by one parent while the other is recessive. The way a word is used this year is its phenotype, but it has deeply immutable meanings, often hidden, which is its genotype.... The separate languages of the Indo-European family were at one time, perhaps five thousand years ago, maybe much longer, a single language. The separation of the speakers by migrations had effects on language comparable to the speciation observed by Darwin on various islands of the Galapagos. Languages became different species, retaining enough resemblance to an original ancestor so that the family resemblance can still be seen.
in 'Living Language,' The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher, (1974, 1984), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (126)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4107)  |  Ancestor (61)  |  Animal (617)  |  Behind (137)  |  Body (537)  |  Compound (113)  |  Different (577)  |  Effect (394)  |  Enough (341)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Family (95)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Galapagos (5)  |  Genotype (8)  |  Great (1575)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Individual (404)  |  Island (46)  |  Language (293)  |  Leg (34)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (235)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Migration (11)  |  More (2559)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Observed (149)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Phenotype (5)  |  Recessive (6)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  Single (354)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (402)  |  Still (613)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1216)  |  Wild (87)  |  Word (622)  |  Year (932)

Let him [the author] be permitted also in all humility to add … that in consequence of the large arrears of algebraical and arithmetical speculations waiting in his mind their turn to be called into outward existence, he is driven to the alternative of leaving the fruits of his meditations to perish (as has been the fate of too many foregone theories, the still-born progeny of his brain, now forever resolved back again into the primordial matter of thought), or venturing to produce from time to time such imperfect sketches as the present, calculated to evoke the mental co-operation of his readers, in whom the algebraical instinct has been to some extent developed, rather than to satisfy the strict demands of rigorously systematic exposition.
In Philosophic Magazine (1863), 460.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Algebra (114)  |  All (4107)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Arrears (2)  |  Author (168)  |  Back (391)  |  Brain (270)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Call (769)  |  Consequence (207)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Demand (123)  |  Develop (268)  |  Drive (55)  |  Evoke (12)  |  Existence (460)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fate (72)  |  Forego (4)  |  Forever (103)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Humility (28)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Let (61)  |  Matter (801)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Operation (213)  |  Outward (7)  |  Perish (50)  |  Permit (58)  |  Present (620)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Produce (104)  |  Reader (41)  |  Resolve (41)  |  Rigorous (49)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Sketch (8)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Still (613)  |  Stillborn (2)  |  Strict (17)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Theory (972)  |  Thought (954)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Venture (18)  |  Wait (58)  |  Waiting (43)

Some see a clear line between genetic enhancement and other ways that people seek improvement in their children and themselves. Genetic manipulation seems somehow worse - more intrusive, more sinister - than other ways of enhancing performance and seeking success. But, morally speaking, the difference is less significant than it seems. Bioengineering gives us reason to question the low-tech, high-pressure child-rearing practices we commonly accept. The hyperparenting familiar in our time represents an anxious excess of mastery and dominion that misses the sense of life as a gift. This draws it disturbingly close to eugenics... Was the old eugenics objectionable only insofar as it was coercive? Or is there something inherently wrong with the resolve to deliberately design our progeny's traits... But removing coercion does not vindicate eugenics. The problem with eugenics and genetic engineering is that they represent a one-sided triumph of willfulness over giftedness, of dominion over reverence, of molding over beholding.
Michael J. Sandel, 'The Case Against Perfection', The Atlantic Monthly (Apr 2004).
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (192)  |  Bioengineering (4)  |  Bioethics (12)  |  Child (309)  |  Children (200)  |  Design (196)  |  Difference (337)  |  Draw (137)  |  Engineering (176)  |  Enhancement (5)  |  Eugenics (6)  |  Excess (22)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetic Engineering (15)  |  Gift (104)  |  High (363)  |  Improvement (110)  |  Life (1799)  |  Low (81)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mastery (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (480)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Performance (49)  |  Practice (204)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Problem (679)  |  Question (622)  |  Reason (744)  |  Represent (154)  |  Resolve (41)  |  See (1082)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significant (74)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Something (719)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Sports (2)  |  Success (303)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Way (1216)  |  Wrong (234)

That alone is worthy to be called Natural History, which investigates and records the condition of living things, of things in a state of nature; if animals, of living animals:— which tells of their 'sayings and doings,' their varied notes and utterances, songs and cries; their actions, in ease and under the pressure of circumstances; their affections and passions, towards their young, towards each other, towards other animals, towards man: their various arts and devices, to protect their progeny, to procure food, to escape from their enemies, to defend themselves from attacks; their ingenious resources for concealment; their stratagems to overcome their victims; their modes of bringing forth, of feeding, and of training, their offspring; the relations of their structure to their wants and habits; the countries in which they dwell; their connexion with the intimate world around them, mountain or plain, forest or field, barren heath or bushy dell, open savanna or wild hidden glen, river, lake, or sea:— this would be indeed zoology, i.e. the science of living creatures.
A Naturalist's Sojourn in Jamaica (1851), vi-vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (328)  |  Affection (43)  |  Alone (312)  |  Animal (617)  |  Art (657)  |  Attack (84)  |  Barren (30)  |  Call (769)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Concealment (10)  |  Condition (357)  |  Creature (233)  |  Device (70)  |  Doing (280)  |  Escape (80)  |  Field (365)  |  Food (199)  |  Forest (150)  |  Habit (168)  |  History (675)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mountain (187)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Passion (114)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Protect (58)  |  Record (154)  |  River (121)  |  Science (3880)  |  Sea (309)  |  Song (37)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (346)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Training (80)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Various (200)  |  Victim (35)  |  Want (497)  |  Wild (87)  |  World (1778)  |  Young (228)  |  Zoology (36)

The uniformity of the earth’s life, more astonishing than its diversity, is accountable by the high probability that we derived, originally, from some single cell, fertilized in a bolt of lightning as the earth cooled. It is from the progeny of this parent cell that we take our looks; we still share genes around, and the resemblance of the enzymes of grasses to those of whales is a family resemblance.
In The Lives of a Cell (1974), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Bolt (10)  |  Cell (138)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Earth (998)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Family (95)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Gene (98)  |  Grass (46)  |  High (363)  |  Life (1799)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Parent (76)  |  Probability (132)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Share (75)  |  Sharing (11)  |  Single (354)  |  Still (613)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Whale (32)

When two plants, constantly different in one or several traits, are crossed, the traits they have in common are transmitted unchanged to the hybrids and their progeny, as numerous experiments have proven; a pair of differing traits, on the other hand, are united in the hybrid to form a new trait, which usually is subject to changes in the hybrids' progeny.
'Experiments on Plant Hybrids' (1865). In Curt Stern and Eva R. Sherwood (eds.), The Origin of Genetics: A Mendel Source Book (1966), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (595)  |  Common (436)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Form (960)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  New (1217)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (295)  |  Subject (522)  |  Trait (22)  |  Transmit (11)  |  Two (937)  |  Usually (176)

With highly civilised nations continued progress depends in a subordinate degree on natural selection; for such nations do not supplant and exterminate one another as do savage tribes. Nevertheless the more intelligent members within the same community will succeed better in the long run than the inferior, and leave a more numerous progeny, and this is a form of natural selection.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (488)  |  Civilised (3)  |  Community (104)  |  Continue (165)  |  Degree (275)  |  Depend (228)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exterminate (8)  |  Form (960)  |  Highly (16)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Leave (130)  |  Long (789)  |  Member (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (194)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Progress (468)  |  Run (174)  |  Same (157)  |  Savage (31)  |  Selection (128)  |  Subordinate (9)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Supplant (3)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Will (2354)

[Vestiges begins] from principles which are at variance with all sober inductive truth. The sober facts of geology shuffled, so as to play a rogue’s game; phrenology (that sinkhole of human folly and prating coxcombry); spontaneous generation; transmutation of species; and I know not what; all to be swallowed, without tasting and trying, like so much horse-physic!! Gross credulity and rank infidelity joined in unlawful marriage, and breeding a deformed progeny of unnatural conclusions!
Letter to Charles Lyell (9 Apr 1845). In John Willis Clark and Thomas McKenny Hughes (eds.), The Life and Letters of the Reverend Adam Sedgwick (1890), Vol. 2, 83.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Begin (260)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Conclusion (255)  |  Credulity (14)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Folly (43)  |  Game (101)  |  Generation (242)  |  Geology (220)  |  Horse (75)  |  Human (1470)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Infidelity (3)  |  Know (1519)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Phrenology (5)  |  Physic (516)  |  Principle (510)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rogue (2)  |  Shuffle (5)  |  Sober (9)  |  Species (402)  |  Spontaneous (27)  |  Spontaneous Generation (9)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Taste (90)  |  Transmutation (23)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unlawful (2)  |  Unnatural (15)  |  Variance (12)  |  Vestige (11)  |  Vestiges (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.