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Feedback Quotes (8 quotes)

Evolution is chaos with feedback.
In Clifford A. Pickover, Computers, Pattern, Chaos, and Beauty (2001), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (63)  |  Evolution (482)

It is my thesis that the physical functioning of the living individual and the operation of some of the newer communication machines are precisely parallel in their analogous attempts to control entropy through feedback. Both of them have sensory receptors as one stage in their cycle of operation: that is, in both of them there exists a special apparatus for collecting information from the outer world at low energy levels, and for making it available in the operation of the individual or of the machine. In both cases these external messages are not taken neat, but through the internal transforming powers of the apparatus, whether it be alive or dead. The information is then turned into a new form available for the further stages of performance. In both the animal and the machine this performance is made to be effective on the outer world. In both of them, their performed action on the outer world, and not merely their intended aetion, is reported back to the central regulatory apparatus.
In The Human Use of Human Beings: Cybernetics and Society (1954), 26-27.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (46)  |  Communication (58)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Function (90)  |  Life (917)  |  Machine (133)  |  Operation (96)  |  Performance (27)  |  Sense (240)  |  Thesis (10)

The elements of human nature are the learning rules, emotional reinforcers, and hormonal feedback loops that guide the development of social behaviour into certain channels as opposed to others. Human nature is not just the array of outcomes attained in existing societies. It is also the potential array that might be achieved through conscious design by future societies. By looking over the realized social systems of hundreds of animal species and deriving the principles by which these systems have evolved, we can be certain that all human choices represent only a tiny subset of those theoretically possible. Human nature is, moreover, a hodgepodge of special genetic adaptations to an environment largely vanished, the world of the Ice­Age hunter-gatherer.
In On Human Nature (1978), 196.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Gene (68)  |  Hormone (7)  |  Human Nature (51)  |  Hunter-Gatherer (2)  |  Ice Age (7)  |  Rule (135)  |  Society (188)

The phenomenon of emergence takes place at critical points of instability that arise from fluctuations in the environment, amplified by feedback loops. Emergence results in the creation of novelty, and this novelty is often qualitatively different from the phenomenon out of which it emerged.
In The Hidden Connections (2002), 116-117.
Science quotes on:  |  Amplification (3)  |  Creation (211)  |  Critical (34)  |  Critical Point (2)  |  Difference (208)  |  Emergence (21)  |  Environment (138)  |  Fluctuation (7)  |  Instability (3)  |  Loop (4)  |  Novelty (19)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Point (72)  |  Qualitative (12)

The Republic of Technology where we will be living is a feedback world.
In The Republic of Technology: Reflections on our Future Community (1979), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Live (186)  |  Republic (5)  |  Technology (199)  |  World (667)

There is nothing distinctively scientific about the hypothetico-deductive process. It is not even distinctively intellectual. It is merely a scientific context for a much more general stratagem that underlies almost all regulative processes or processes of continuous control, namely feedback, the control of performance by the consequences of the act performed. In the hypothetico-deductive scheme the inferences we draw from a hypothesis are, in a sense, its logical output. If they are true, the hypothesis need not be altered, but correction is obligatory if they are false. The continuous feedback from inference to hypothesis is implicit in Whewell’s account of scientific method; he would not have dissented from the view that scientific behaviour can be classified as appropriately under cybernetics as under logic.
Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought (1969), 54-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Behaviour (24)  |  Classification (79)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Context (17)  |  Control (93)  |  Correction (28)  |  Cybernetics (3)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Dissent (7)  |  Distinctive (8)  |  False (79)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Implicit (4)  |  Inference (26)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Logic (187)  |  Output (9)  |  Performance (27)  |  Process (201)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Stratagem (2)  |  Truth (750)  |  William Whewell (55)

We have decided to call the entire field of control and communication theory, whether in the machine or in the animal, by the name Cybernetics, which we form from the Greek … for steersman. In choosing this term, we wish to recognize that the first significant paper on feedback mechanisms is an article on governors, which was published by Clerk Maxwell in 1868, and that governor is derived from a Latin corruption … We also wish to refer to the fact that the steering engines of a ship are indeed one of the earliest and best-developed forms of feedback mechanisms.
In Cybernetics (1948), 19.
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[The toughest part of being in charge is] killing ideas that are great but poorly timed. And delivering tough feedback that’s difficult to hear but that I know will help people—and the team—in the long term.
In Issie Lapowsky, 'Scott Belsky', Inc. (Nov 2013), 140. Biography in Context,
Science quotes on:  |  Business (71)  |  Deliver (3)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Hear (33)  |  Help (68)  |  Idea (440)  |  Kill (37)  |  Know (321)  |  Leadership (5)  |  Long Term (2)  |  People (269)  |  Poorly (2)  |  Team (5)  |  Time (439)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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