Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Entirety

Entirety Quotes (6 quotes)

Considered in its entirety, psychoanalysis won’t do. It is an end product, moreover, like a dinosaur or a zeppelin, no better theory can ever be erected on its ruins, which will remain for ever one of the saddest and strangest of all landmarks in the history of twentieth century thought.
From 'Further Comments on Psychoanalysis', The Hope of Progress: A Scientist Looks at Problems in Philosophy, Literature and Science (1973), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Century (310)  |  Consider (416)  |  Considering (6)  |  Dinosaur (26)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Erected (2)  |  History (673)  |  Landmark (9)  |  Product (160)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Remain (349)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Strangest (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zeppelin (4)

Dad [Walter C. Alvarez] … advised me to sit every few months in my reading chair for an entire evening, close my eyes and try to think of new problems to solve. I took his advice very seriously and have been glad ever since that he did.
In Alvarez: Adventures of a Physicist (1987), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Chair (24)  |  Evening (12)  |  Eye (419)  |  Father (110)  |  Gladness (5)  |  Month (88)  |  New (1216)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reading (133)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Think (1086)  |  Try (283)

For the philosopher, order is the entirety of repetitions manifested, in the form of types or of laws, by perceived objects. Order is an intelligible relation. For the biologist, order is a sequence in space and time. However, according to Plato, all things arise out of their opposites. Order was born of the original disorder, and the long evolution responsible for the present biological order necessarily had to engender disorder.
An organism is a molecular society, and biological order is a kind of social order. Social order is opposed to revolution, which is an abrupt change of order, and to anarchy, which is the absence of order.
I am presenting here today both revolution and anarchy, for which I am fortunately not the only one responsible. However, anarchy cannot survive and prosper except in an ordered society, and revolution becomes sooner or later the new order. Viruses have not failed to follow the general law. They are strict parasites which, born of disorder, have created a very remarkable new order to ensure their own perpetuation.
'Interaction Among Virus, Cell, and Organism', Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1965). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1963-1970 (1972), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Anarchy (6)  |  Arise (158)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fail (185)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Perpetuation (4)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plato (76)  |  Present (619)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (326)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Type (167)  |  Virus (27)

In Euclid each proposition stands by itself; its connection with others is never indicated; the leading ideas contained in its proof are not stated; general principles do not exist. In modern methods, on the other hand, the greatest importance is attached to the leading thoughts which pervade the whole; and general principles, which bring whole groups of theorems under one aspect, are given rather than separate propositions. The whole tendency is toward generalization. A straight line is considered as given in its entirety, extending both ways to infinity, while Euclid is very careful never to admit anything but finite quantities. The treatment of the infinite is in fact another fundamental difference between the two methods. Euclid avoids it, in modern mathematics it is systematically introduced, for only thus is generality obtained.
In 'Geometry', Encyclopedia Britannica (9th edition).
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (45)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Both (493)  |  Bring (90)  |  Careful (24)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contain (68)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Give (202)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Group (78)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obtain (163)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pervade (10)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proof (287)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Separate (143)  |  Stand (274)  |  State (491)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thought (953)  |  Toward (45)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

Let him who so wishes take pleasure in boring us with all the wonders of nature: let one spend his life observing insects, another counting the tiny bones in the hearing membrane of certain fish, even in measuring, if you will, how far a flea can jump, not to mention so many other wretched objects of study; for myself, who am curious only about philosophy, who am sorry only not to be able to extend its horizons, active nature will always be my sole point of view; I love to see it from afar, in its breadth and its entirety, and not in specifics or in little details, which, although to some extent necessary in all the sciences, are generally the mark of little genius among those who devote themselves to them.
'L'Homme Plante', in Oeuvres Philosophiques de La Mettrie (1796), Vol. 2, 70-1. Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, edited by Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  All (4108)  |  Bone (95)  |  Boring (7)  |  Breadth (15)  |  Certain (550)  |  Counting (26)  |  Curious (91)  |  Detail (146)  |  Ear (68)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fish (120)  |  Flea (11)  |  Genius (284)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Insect (77)  |  Jump (29)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Mention (82)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sole (49)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Specific (95)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tiny (72)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wretched (8)

There is not a soul on Earth who can read the deluge of physics publications in its entirety. As a result, it is sad but true that physics has irretrievably fallen apart from a cohesive to a fragmented discipline. … It was not that long ago that people were complaining about two cultures. If we only had it that good today.
In 'The Physical Review Then and Now', in H. Henry Stroke, Physical Review: The First Hundred Years: a Selection of Seminal Papers and Commentaries, Vol. 1, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cohesive (4)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Culture (143)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Good (889)  |  Long (790)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Publication (101)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Result (677)  |  Soul (226)  |  Today (314)  |  Two (937)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.