Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I was going to record talking... the foil was put on; I then shouted 'Mary had a little lamb',... and the machine reproduced it perfectly.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Omit

Omit Quotes (11 quotes)

Et j’espère que nos neveux me sauront gré, non seulement des choses que j'ai ici expliquées, mais aussi de celles que j'ai omises volontairement, afin de leur laisser le plaisir de les inventer.
I hope that posterity will judge me kindly, not only as to the things which I have explained, but also as to those which I have intentionally omitted so as to leave to others the pleasure of discovery.
Concluding remark in Géométrie (1637), as translated by David Eugene Smith and Marcia L. Latham, in The Geometry of René Descartes (1925, 1954), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (780)  |  Explain (322)  |  Hope (299)  |  Intentional (4)  |  Judge (108)  |  Kindly (2)  |  Leave (130)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

A Law of Nature, (Lex Naturalis) is a Precept, or general Rule, found out by Reason, by which a man is forbidden to do, that, which is destructive of his life, or taketh away the means of preserving the same; and to omit, that, by which he thinketh it may be best preserved
Leviathan, ch. 14 (1651).
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Destructive (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  General (511)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Precept (10)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Same (157)

He who knows what best to omit is the best teacher.
In Otto Neurath, Empiricism and Sociology (1973), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Teacher (143)

I believed that, instead of the multiplicity of rules that comprise logic, I would have enough in the following four, as long as I made a firm and steadfast resolution never to fail to observe them.
The first was never to accept anything as true if I did not know clearly that it was so; that is, carefully to avoid prejudice and jumping to conclusions, and to include nothing in my judgments apart from whatever appeared so clearly and distinctly to my mind that I had no opportunity to cast doubt upon it.
The second was to subdivide each on the problems I was about to examine: into as many parts as would be possible and necessary to resolve them better.
The third was to guide my thoughts in an orderly way by beginning, as if by steps, to knowledge of the most complex, and even by assuming an order of the most complex, and even by assuming an order among objects in! cases where there is no natural order among them.
And the final rule was: in all cases, to make such comprehensive enumerations and such general review that I was certain not to omit anything.
The long chains of inferences, all of them simple and easy, that geometers normally use to construct their most difficult demonstrations had given me an opportunity to think that all the things that can fall within the scope of human knowledge follow from each other in a similar way, and as long as one avoids accepting something as true which is not so, and as long as one always observes the order required to deduce them from each other, there cannot be anything so remote that it cannot be reached nor anything so hidden that it cannot be uncovered.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 2, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Better (486)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Complex (188)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Construct (124)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fall (230)  |  Final (118)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Inference (45)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remote (83)  |  Required (108)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Review (26)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scope (45)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)

I have said that mathematics is the oldest of the sciences; a glance at its more recent history will show that it has the energy of perpetual youth. The output of contributions to the advance of the science during the last century and more has been so enormous that it is difficult to say whether pride in the greatness of achievement in this subject, or despair at his inability to cope with the multiplicity of its detailed developments, should be the dominant feeling of the mathematician. Few people outside of the small circle of mathematical specialists have any idea of the vast growth of mathematical literature. The Royal Society Catalogue contains a list of nearly thirty- nine thousand papers on subjects of Pure Mathematics alone, which have appeared in seven hundred serials during the nineteenth century. This represents only a portion of the total output, the very large number of treatises, dissertations, and monographs published during the century being omitted.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 285.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Advance (280)  |  Alone (311)  |  Appear (118)  |  Being (1278)  |  Catalogue (5)  |  Century (310)  |  Circle (110)  |  Contain (68)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Cope (6)  |  Despair (40)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dissertation (2)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Glance (34)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inability (10)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  List (10)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Monograph (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nineteenth (6)  |  Number (699)  |  Oldest (8)  |  Output (10)  |  Outside (141)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Portion (84)  |  Pride (78)  |  Publish (36)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Recent (77)  |  Represent (155)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serial (4)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Society (326)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thirty (6)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Total (94)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)  |  Youth (101)

Published papers may omit important steps and the memory of men of science, even the greatest, is sadly fallible.
Science and Industry in the Nineteenth Century (1953), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Fallible (6)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Paper (182)  |  Publication (101)  |  Science (3879)  |  Step (231)

Secondly, the study of mathematics would show them the necessity there is in reasoning, to separate all the distinct ideas, and to see the habitudes that all those concerned in the present inquiry have to one another, and to lay by those which relate not to the proposition in hand, and wholly to leave them out of the reckoning. This is that which, in other respects besides quantity is absolutely requisite to just reasoning, though in them it is not so easily observed and so carefully practised. In those parts of knowledge where it is thought demonstration has nothing to do, men reason as it were in a lump; and if upon a summary and confused view, or upon a partial consideration, they can raise the appearance of a probability, they usually rest content; especially if it be in a dispute where every little straw is laid hold on, and everything that can but be drawn in any way to give color to the argument is advanced with ostentation. But that mind is not in a posture to find truth that does not distinctly take all the parts asunder, and, omitting what is not at all to the point, draws a conclusion from the result of all the particulars which in any way influence it.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argument (138)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Color (137)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confused (12)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Content (69)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Easily (35)  |  Especially (31)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Give (202)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hold (95)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laid (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Lump (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Partial (10)  |  Particular (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Posture (7)  |  Practise (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Show (346)  |  Straw (7)  |  Study (653)  |  Summary (11)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)

The human understanding is unquiet; it cannot stop or rest, and still presses onward, but in vain. Therefore it is that we cannot conceive of any end or limit to the world, but always as of necessity it occurs to us that there is something beyond... But he is no less an unskilled and shallow philosopher who seeks causes of that which is most general, than he who in things subordinate and subaltern omits to do so
From Aphorism 48, Novum Organum, Book I (1620). Collected in James Spedding (ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1858), Vol. 4, 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  General (511)  |  Human (1468)  |  Limit (280)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Occur (150)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Rest (280)  |  Seek (213)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unskilled (4)  |  Vain (83)  |  World (1774)

The method of science depends on our attempts to describe the world with simple theories: theories that are complex may become untestable, even if they happen to be true. Science may be described as the art of systematic over-simplification—the art of discerning what we may with advantage omit.
Karl Raimund Popper and William Warren Bartley (ed.), The Open Universe: an Argument for Indeterminism (1991), 44. by Karl Raimund Popper, William Warren Bartley - Science - 1991
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Depend (228)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Happen (274)  |  Method (505)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

The problem for a writer of a text-book has come now, in fact, to be this—to write a book so neatly trimmed and compacted that no coach, on looking through it, can mark a single passage which the candidate for a minimum pass can safely omit. Some of these text-books I have seen, where the scientific matter has been, like the lady’s waist in the nursery song, compressed “so gent and sma’,” that the thickness barely, if at all, surpasses what is devoted to the publisher’s advertisements. We shall return, I verily believe, to the Compendium of Martianus Capella. The result of all this is that science, in the hands of specialists, soars higher and higher into the light of day, while educators and the educated are left more and more to wander in primeval darkness.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science (1885), Nature, 32, 448. [Martianus Capella, who flourished c.410-320, wrote a compendium of the seven liberal arts. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advertisement (13)  |  All (4108)  |  Barely (5)  |  Book (392)  |  Candidate (8)  |  Coach (5)  |  Compact (13)  |  Compress (2)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Educator (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Higher (37)  |  Lady (11)  |  Light (607)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mark (43)  |  Matter (798)  |  Minimum (12)  |  More (2559)  |  Neat (5)  |  Nursery (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passage (50)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Problem (676)  |  Publisher (3)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Safely (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Single (353)  |  Soar (23)  |  Song (37)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Student (300)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Text-Book (5)  |  Thickness (5)  |  Through (849)  |  Trim (3)  |  Waist (2)  |  Wander (35)  |  Write (230)  |  Writer (86)

There is another ground of hope that must not be omitted. Let men but think over their infinite expenditure of understanding, time, and means on matters and pursuits of far less use and value; whereof, if but a small part were directed to sound and solid studies, there is no difficulty that might not be overcome.
Translation of Novum Organum, CXI. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direct (225)  |  Expenditure (15)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hope (299)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Small (477)  |  Solid (116)  |  Sound (183)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.