Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Bench

Bench Quotes (8 quotes)

I was working with a Crookes tube covered by a shield of black cardboard. A piece of barium platino-cyanide paper lay on the bench there. I had been passing a current through the tube, and I noticed a peculiar black line across the paper. …
The effect was one which could only be produced in ordinary parlance by the passage of light. No light could come from the tube because the shield which covered it was impervious to any light known even that of the electric arc. …
I did not think; I investigated. …
I assumed that the effect must have come from the tube since its character indicated that it could come from nowhere else. … It seemed at first a new kind of invisible light. It was clearly something new something unrecorded. …
There is much to do, and I am busy, very busy. [Describing to a journalist the discovery of X-rays that he had made on 8 Nov 1895.]
In H.J.W. Dam in 'The New Marvel in Photography", McClure's Magazine (Apr 1896), 4:5, 413.
Science quotes on:  |  Arc (12)  |  Barium (4)  |  Busy (28)  |  Character (243)  |  Current (118)  |  Discovery (785)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (394)  |  Electric (76)  |  Experiment (696)  |  First (1284)  |  Impervious (5)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Invisible (64)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Light (609)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1217)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Paper (183)  |  Passage (50)  |  Passing (76)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Photograph (20)  |  Produced (187)  |  Ray (114)  |  Shield (6)  |  Something (719)  |  Test (212)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (415)  |  Through (849)  |  X-ray (37)

Scientists are supposed to live in ivory towers. Their darkrooms and their vibration-proof benches are supposed to isolate their activities from the disturbances of common life. What they tell us is supposed to be for the ages, not for the next election. But the reality may be otherwise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Age (499)  |  Common (436)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Election (7)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Ivory Tower (5)  |  Life (1799)  |  Live (629)  |  Next (236)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Proof (289)  |  Reality (262)  |  Scientist (825)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tower (42)  |  Vibration (20)

Sometimes you get a glimpse of a semicolon coming, a few lines farther on, and it is like climbing a steep path through woods and seeing a wooden bench just at a bend in the road ahead, a place where you can expect to sit for a moment, catching your breath.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1995), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Breath (59)  |  Coming (114)  |  Expect (201)  |  Farther (51)  |  Language (293)  |  Moment (254)  |  Path (145)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Through (849)  |  Wood (92)

Tell a man that there are 300 billion stars in the universe, and he’ll believe you. Tell him that a bench has wet paint upon it and he’ll have to touch it to be sure.
Anonymous
Occasionally seen attributed to Albert Einstein, but without citation, so it is most likely anonymous.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Billion (96)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Man (2249)  |  Paint (22)  |  Star (430)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sure (14)  |  Tell (340)  |  Touch (142)  |  Universe (861)

The rigid career path of a professor at a modern university is that One Must Build the Big Research Group, recruit doctoral students more vigorously than the head football coach, bombard the federal agencies with grant applications more numerous than the pollen falling from the heavens in spring, and leave the paper writing and the research to the postdocs, research associates, and students who do all the bench work and all the computer programming. A professor is chained to his previous topics by his Big Group, his network of contacts built up laboriously over decades, and the impossibility of large funding except in areas where the grantee has grown the group from a corner of the building to an entire floor. The senior tenure-track faculty at a research university–the “silverbacks” in anthropological jargon–are bound by invisible chains stronger than the strongest steel to a narrow range of what the Prevailing Consensus agrees are Very Important Problems. The aspiring scientist is confronted with the reality that his mentors are all business managers.
In his Foreword to Cornelius Lanczos, Discourse on Fourier Series, ix-x.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Application (242)  |  Associate (25)  |  Bound (119)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Business (149)  |  Career (76)  |  Coach (5)  |  Computer (127)  |  Consensus (8)  |  Contact (65)  |  Corner (57)  |  Decade (59)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Football (10)  |  Funding (19)  |  Grant (73)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Invisible (64)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Large (394)  |  Manager (6)  |  Mentor (3)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Network (21)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Paper (183)  |  Path (145)  |  Pollen (6)  |  Postgraduate (2)  |  Problem (679)  |  Professor (129)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (262)  |  Research (677)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Scientist (825)  |  Senior (6)  |  Silverback (2)  |  Spring (133)  |  Steel (22)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Student (301)  |  Tenure (7)  |  Topic (21)  |  Track (40)  |  University (121)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

While working with staphylococcus variants a number of culture-plates were set aside on the laboratory bench and examined from time to time. In the examinations these plates were necessarily exposed to the air and they became contaminated with various micro-organisms. It was noticed that around a large colony of a contaminating mould the staphylococcus colonies became transparent and were obviously undergoing lysis. Subcultures of this mould were made and experiments conducted with a view to ascertaining something of the properties of the bacteriolytic substance which had evidently been formed in the mould culture and which had diffused into the surrounding medium. It was found that broth in which the mould had been grown at room temperature for one or two weeks had acquired marked inhibitory, bacteriocidal and bacteriolytic properties to many of the more common pathogenic bacteria.
'On the Antibacterial Action of Cultures of a Penicillium, with Special Reference to their Use in the Isolation of B. Influenzae', British Journal of Experimental Pathology, 1929, 10, 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Air (349)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bacteriology (5)  |  Common (436)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Culture (143)  |  Discovery (785)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Examination (98)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Form (960)  |  Laboratory (197)  |  Large (394)  |  Lysis (4)  |  Marked (55)  |  Micro-Organism (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Number (701)  |  Organism (220)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Set (394)  |  Something (719)  |  Staphylococcus (2)  |  Substance (248)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Two (937)  |  Variant (9)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Week (70)

Would it (the world) otherwise (without consciousness) have remained a play before empty benches, not existing for anybody, thus quite properly not existing?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Empty (80)  |  Exist (444)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Play (111)  |  Properly (20)  |  Remain (349)  |  World (1778)

[Richard Feynman] would be standing in front of the hall smiling at us all as we came in, his fingers tapping out a complicated rhythm on the black top of the demonstration bench that crossed the front of the lecture hall. As latecomers took their seats, he picked up the chalk and began spinning it rapidly through his fingers in a manner of a professional gambler playing with a poker chip, still smiling happily as if at some secret joke. And then—still smiling—he talked to us about physics, his diagrams and equations helping us to share his understanding. It was no secret joke that brought the smile and the sparkle in his eye, it was physics. The joy of physics!
Describing his experience as a student attending Feynman lectures, in Introduction to Richard P. Feynman Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! : Adventures of a Curious Character (1986, 2010), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Demonstration (114)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Equation (132)  |  Eye (423)  |  Joke (84)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lecture (106)  |  Physic (516)  |  Physics (533)  |  Playing (42)  |  Professional (70)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Secret (195)  |  Share (75)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Still (613)  |  Through (849)  |  Top (96)  |  Understanding (514)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.