Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Phase

Phase Quotes (36 quotes)

Abstract as it is, science is but an outgrowth of life. That is what the teacher must continually keep in mind. … Let him explain … science is not a dead system—the excretion of a monstrous pedantism—but really one of the most vigorous and exuberant phases of human life.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 195-196.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Continually (16)  |  Dead (59)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Explain (322)  |  Exuberant (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Monstrous (7)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Outgrowth (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Vigorous (20)

Again and again, often in the busiest phases of the insulin investigations, he [Frederick Banting] found time to set a fracture or perform a surgical operation on one of his army comrades or on some patient who was in need.
In 'Obituary: Sir Frederick Banting', Science (14 Mar 1941), N.S. 93, No. 2411, 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Army (33)  |  Sir Frederick Grant Banting (10)  |  Comrade (3)  |  Fracture (6)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Operation (213)  |  Patient (199)  |  Perform (121)  |  Set (394)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Time (1877)

Even fairly good students, when they have obtained the solution of the problem and written down neatly the argument, shut their books and look for something else. Doing so, they miss an important and instructive phase of the work. ... A good teacher should understand and impress on his students the view that no problem whatever is completely exhausted.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Book (392)  |  Completely (135)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Doing (280)  |  Down (456)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Good (889)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impress (64)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Look (582)  |  Miss (51)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Problem (676)  |  Shut (41)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

Every great anthropologic and paleontologic discovery fits into its proper place, enabling us gradually to fill out, one after another, the great branching lines of human ascent and to connect with the branches definite phases of industry and art. This gives us a double means of interpretation, archaeological and anatomical. While many branches and links in the chain remain to be discovered, we are now in a position to predict with great confidence not only what the various branches will be like but where they are most like to be found.
In Henry Fairfield Osborn, 'Osborn States the Case For Evolution', New York Times (12 Jul 1925), XX1
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Art (657)  |  Branch (150)  |  Branching (10)  |  Chain (50)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Connect (125)  |  Definite (110)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fit (134)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Industry (137)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Link (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Position (77)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Proper (144)  |  Remain (349)  |  Tree Of Life (10)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

Finite systems of deterministic ordinary nonlinear differential equations may be designed to represent forced dissipative hydrodynamic flow. Solutions of these equations can be identified with trajectories in phase space. For those systems with bounded solutions, it is found that nonperiodic solutions are ordinarily unstable with respect to small modifications, so that slightly differing initial states can evolve into considerably different states. Systems with bounded solutions are shown to possess bounded numerical solutions.
A simple system representing cellular convection is solved numerically. All of the solutions are found to be unstable, and almost all of them are nonperiodic.
The feasibility of very-long-range weather prediction is examined in the light of these results
Abstract from his landmark paper introducing Chaos Theory in relation to weather prediction, 'Deterministic Nonperiodic Flow', Journal of the Atmospheric Science (Mar 1963), 20, 130.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bound (119)  |  Chaos Theory (4)  |  Convection (3)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Equation (132)  |  Feasibility (4)  |  Finite (59)  |  Flow (83)  |  Hydrodynamics (5)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nonlinear (4)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Phase Space (2)  |  Possess (156)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Range (99)  |  Represent (155)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Simple (406)  |  Small (477)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Weather (44)  |  Weather Prediction (2)

From the rocket we can see the huge sphere of the planet in one or another phase of the Moon. We can see how the sphere rotates, and how within a few hours it shows all its sides successively ... and we shall observe various points on the surface of the Earth for several minutes and from different sides very closely. This picture is so majestic, attractive and infinitely varied that I wish with all my soul that you and I could see it. (1911)
As translated in William E. Burrows, The Survival Imperative: Using Space to Protect Earth (2007), 147. From Tsiolkovsky's 'The Investigation of Universal Space by Means of Reactive Devices', translated in K.E. Tsiolkovsky, Works on Rocket Technology (NASA, NASATT F-243, n.d.), 76-77.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Hour (186)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Minute (125)  |  Moon (237)  |  Observe (168)  |  Picture (143)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Rotate (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (233)  |  Soul (226)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Varied (6)  |  Various (200)  |  Wish (212)

Houston, that may have seemed like a very long final phase. The autotargeting was taking us right into a... crater, with a large number of big boulders and rocks ... and it required... flying manually over the rock field to find a reasonably good area.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Area (31)  |  Big (48)  |  Boulder (8)  |  Crater (8)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Good (889)  |  Houston (5)  |  Large (394)  |  Long (790)  |  Number (699)  |  Reasonably (3)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Right (452)  |  Rock (161)  |  Seem (145)

I am Freeth, and I have come to apply the phase-rule to the ammonia-soda process.
First words on joining the Brunner-Mond Company in 1907.
W. F. L. Dick, A Hundred Years of Alkali in Cheshire (1973), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Apply (160)  |  Company (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Industrial Chemistry (2)  |  Joining (11)  |  Process (423)  |  Rule (294)  |  Word (619)

I do not share in this reverence for knowledge as such. It all depends on who has the knowledge and what he does with it. That knowledge which adds greatly to character is knowledge so handled as to transform every phase of immediate experience.
In 'The Rhythmic Claims of Freedom and Discipline', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Character (243)  |  Depend (228)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Experience (467)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Share (75)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)

I have seen many phases of life; I have moved in imperial circles, I have been a Minister of State; but if I had to live my life again, I would always remain in my laboratory, for the greatest joy of my life has been to accomplish original scientific work, and, next to that, to lecture to a set of intelligent students.
Quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Circle (110)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Imperial (2)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Joy (107)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Next (236)  |  Remain (349)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Set (394)  |  State (491)  |  Student (300)  |  Work (1351)

I take it that a monograph of this sort belongs to the ephemera literature of science. The studied care which is warranted in the treatment of the more slowly moving branches of science would be out of place here. Rather with the pen of a journalist we must attempt to record a momentary phase of current thought, which may at any instant change with kaleidoscopic abruptness.
Valence and the Structure of Atoms and Molecules (1923), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Belong (162)  |  Care (186)  |  Change (593)  |  Current (118)  |  Instant (45)  |  Journalist (8)  |  Kaleidoscope (5)  |  Literature (103)  |  Monograph (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pen (20)  |  Publication (101)  |  Record (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Warrant (8)

If we wish to imitate the physical sciences, we must not imitate them in their contemporary, most developed form; we must imitate them in their historical youth, when their state of development was comparable to our own at the present time. Otherwise we should behave like boys who try to copy the imposing manners of full-grown men without understanding their raison d’être, also without seeing that in development one cannot jump over intermediate and preliminary phases.
Gestalt Psychology (1929), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Boy (94)  |  Copy (33)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Form (959)  |  Historical (70)  |  Imitate (17)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Jump (29)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Present (619)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeing (142)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wish (212)  |  Youth (101)

In every phase of business life, keep at least one year ahead of the other fellow.
As quoted by H.M. Davidson, in System: The Magazine of Business (Apr 1922), 41, 412.
Science quotes on:  |  Ahead (19)  |  Business (149)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Keep (101)  |  Least (75)  |  Life (1795)  |  Other (2236)  |  Year (933)

Looking back over the last thousand years, one can divide the development of the machine and the machine civilization into three successive but over-lapping and interpenetrating phases: eotechnic, paleotechnic, neotechnic … Speaking in terms of power and characteristic materials, the eotechnic phase is a water-and-wood complex: the paleotechnic phase is a coal-and-wood complex… The dawn-age of our modern technics stretches roughly from the year 1000 to 1750. It did not, of course, come suddenly to an end in the middle of the eighteenth century. A new movement appeared in industrial society which had been gathering headway almost unnoticed from the fifteenth century on: after 1750 industry passed into a new phase, with a different source of power, different materials, different objectives.
Technics and Civilisation (1934), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Age (499)  |  Back (390)  |  Century (310)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Coal (57)  |  Complex (188)  |  Course (409)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Divide (75)  |  End (590)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Headway (2)  |  Industry (137)  |  Last (426)  |  Looking (189)  |  Machine (257)  |  Material (353)  |  Modern (385)  |  Movement (155)  |  New (1216)  |  Objective (91)  |  Paleotechnic (2)  |  Pass (238)  |  Power (746)  |  Society (326)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Successive (73)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Technics (2)  |  Technology (257)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Water (481)  |  Wood (92)  |  Year (933)

Many consider that the conflict of religion and science is a temporary phase, and that in due course the two mighty rivers of human understanding will merge into an even mightier Amazon of comprehension. I take the opposite view, that reconciliation is impossible. I consider that Science is mightier than the Word, and that the river of religion will (or, at least, should) atrophy and die.
In 'Religion - The Antithesis to Science', Chemistry & Industry (Feb 1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Amazon (9)  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Consider (416)  |  Course (409)  |  Die (86)  |  Due (141)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Merge (3)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Reconciliation (10)  |  Religion (361)  |  River (119)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Two (937)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Mathematics associates new mental images with ... physical abstractions; these images are almost tangible to the trained mind but are far removed from those that are given directly by life and physical experience. For example, a mathematician represents the motion of planets of the solar system by a flow line of an incompressible fluid in a 54-dimensional phase space, whose volume is given by the Liouville measure
Mathematics and Physics (1981), Foreward. Reprinted in Mathematics as Metaphor: Selected Essays of Yuri I. Manin (2007), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Associate (25)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Directly (22)  |  Example (94)  |  Experience (467)  |  Far (154)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Give (202)  |  Image (96)  |  Life (1795)  |  Line (91)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Phase Space (2)  |  Physical (508)  |  Planet (356)  |  Remove (45)  |  Represent (155)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Space (500)  |  System (537)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Train (114)  |  Volume (19)

Neither in the subjective nor in the objective world can we find a criterion for the reality of the number concept, because the first contains no such concept, and the second contains nothing that is free from the concept. How then can we arrive at a criterion? Not by evidence, for the dice of evidence are loaded. Not by logic, for logic has no existence independent of mathematics: it is only one phase of this multiplied necessity that we call mathematics.
How then shall mathematical concepts be judged? They shall not be judged. Mathematics is the supreme arbiter. From its decisions there is no appeal. We cannot change the rules of the game, we cannot ascertain whether the game is fair. We can only study the player at his game; not, however, with the detached attitude of a bystander, for we are watching our own minds at play.
In Number: The Language of Science; a Critical Survey Written for the Cultured Non-Mathematician (1937), 244-245.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Arbiter (5)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Concept (221)  |  Contain (68)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Decision (91)  |  Detach (5)  |  Dice (21)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fair (15)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Free (232)  |  Game (101)  |  Independent (67)  |  Judge (108)  |  Loaded (4)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Objective (91)  |  Play (112)  |  Player (8)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rule (294)  |  Study (653)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Watch (109)  |  World (1774)

Plasticity, then, in the wide sense of the word, means the possession of a structure weak enough to yield to an influence, but strong enough not to yield all at once. Each relatively stable phase of equilibrium in such a structure is marked by what we may call a new set of habits. Organic matter, especially nervous tissue, seems endowed with a very extraordinary degree of plasticity of this sort ; so that we may without hesitation lay down as our first proposition the following, that the phenomena of habit in living beings are due to plasticity of the organic materials of which their bodies are composed.
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 434.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Composition (84)  |  Degree (276)  |  Down (456)  |  Due (141)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Enough (340)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  First (1283)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Influence (222)  |  Living (491)  |  Marked (55)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nerve (79)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Organic (158)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Plasticity (7)  |  Possession (65)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Stable (30)  |  Strong (174)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Weak (71)  |  Wide (96)  |  Word (619)  |  Yield (81)

The epoch of intense cold which preceded the present creation has been only a temporary oscillation of the earth’s temperature, more important than the century-long phases of cooling undergone by the Alpine valleys. It was associated with the disappearance of the animals of the diluvial epoch of the geologists, as still demonstrated by the Siberian mammoths; it preceded the uplifting of the Alps and the appearance of the present-day living organisms, as demonstrated by the moraines and the existence of fishes in our lakes. Consequently, there is complete separation between the present creation and the preceding ones, and if living species are sometimes almost identical to those buried inside the earth, we nevertheless cannot assume that the former are direct descendants of the latter or, in other words, that they represent identical species.
From Discours de Neuchâtel (1837), as translated by Albert V. Carozzi in Studies on Glaciers: Preceded by the Discourse of Neuchâtel (1967), lviii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alp (9)  |  Alps (8)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Century (310)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Creation (327)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Earth (996)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Former (137)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ice Age (9)  |  Identical (53)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Organism (220)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Represent (155)  |  Separation (57)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Valley (32)  |  Word (619)

The explosion of the Alamogordo bomb ended the initial phase of the MED project: the major technical goal had been achieved …. The feat will stand as a great monument of human endeavor for a long time to come.
In Enrico Fermi: Physicist (1970), 148-149. (MED = Manhattan Engineering District, code name for the atomic bomb development project.)
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Alamogordo (2)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  End (590)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Feat (10)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Long (790)  |  Major (84)  |  Monument (45)  |  Project (73)  |  Stand (274)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trinity (9)  |  Will (2355)

The function of Latin literature is its expression of Rome. When to England and France your imagination can add Rome in the background, you have laid firm the foundations of culture. The understanding of Rome leads back to the Mediterranean civilisation of which Rome was the last phase, and it automatically exhibits the geography of Europe, and the functions of seas and rivers and mountains and plains. The merit of this study in the education of youth is its concreteness, its inspiration to action, and the uniform greatness of persons, in their characters and their staging. Their aims were great, their virtues were great, and their vices were great. They had the saving merit of sinning with cart ropes.
In 'The Place of Classics in Education', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Aim (165)  |  Back (390)  |  Background (43)  |  Character (243)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Concreteness (5)  |  Culture (143)  |  Education (378)  |  England (40)  |  Europe (43)  |  Expression (175)  |  Firm (47)  |  Foundation (171)  |  France (27)  |  Function (228)  |  Geography (36)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Last (426)  |  Latin (38)  |  Lead (384)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mediterranean (9)  |  Merit (50)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Person (363)  |  Plain (33)  |  River (119)  |  Rome (19)  |  Rope (7)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sin (42)  |  Study (653)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vice (40)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Youth (101)

The future of Thought, and therefore of History, lies in the hands of the physicists, and … the future historian must seek his education in the world of mathematical physics. A new generation must be brought up to think by new methods, and if our historical departments in the Universities cannot enter this next phase, the physical departments will have to assume this task alone.
In The Degradation of the Democratic Dogma (1920), 283.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Assume (38)  |  Department (92)  |  Education (378)  |  Enter (141)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Hand (143)  |  Historian (54)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mathematical Physics (11)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Seek (213)  |  Task (147)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  University (121)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The Moon and its phases gave man his first calendar. Trying to match that calendar with the seasons helped give him mathematics. The usefulness of the calendar helped give rise to the thought of beneficent gods. And with all that the Moon is beautiful, too.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 164.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beneficent (9)  |  Calendar (9)  |  First (1283)  |  God (757)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moon (237)  |  Rise (166)  |  Season (47)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trying (144)  |  Usefulness (86)

The most important thing we can do is inspire young minds and to advance the kind of science, math and technology education that will help youngsters take us to the next phase of space travel.
As summarized on a CNN web page - without quotation marks - from a statement by Glenn about the fourth National Space Day (4 May 2000). 'All systems go for National Space Day' on CNN website.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Help (105)  |  Important (209)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Kind (557)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Travel (19)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Travel (114)  |  Will (2355)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

The progress of the individual mind is not only an illustration, but an indirect evidence of that of the general mind. The point of departure of the individual and of the race being the same, the phases of the mind of a man correspond to the epochs of the mind of the race. Now, each of us is aware, if he looks back upon his own history, that he was a theologian in his childhood, a metaphysician in his youth, and a natural philosopher in his manhood. All men who are up to their age can verify this for themselves.
The Positive Philosophy, trans. Harriet Martineau (1853), Vol. 1, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Evidence (248)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Individual (404)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Point (580)  |  Progress (465)  |  Race (268)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theologian (22)  |  Verify (23)  |  Youth (101)

The radius of space began at zero; the first stages of the expansion consisted of a rapid expansion determined by the mass of the initial atom, almost equal to the present mass of the universe. If this mass is sufficient, and the estimates which we can make indicate that this is indeed so, the initial expansion was able to permit the radius to exceed the value of the equilibrium radius. The expansion thus took place in three phases: a first period of rapid expansion in which the atom-universe was broken into atomic stars, a period of slowing-down, followed by a third period of accelerated expansion. It is doubtless in this third period that we find ourselves today, and the acceleration of space which followed the period of slow expansion could well be responsible for the separation of stars into extra-galactic nebulae.
From 'La formation des Nebuleuses dans l’Univers en Expansion', Comptes Rendus (1933), 196, 903-904. As translated in Helge Kragh, Cosmology and Controversy: The Historical Development of Two Theories of the Universe (1996), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Atom (355)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Broken (56)  |  Consist (223)  |  Down (456)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Galactic (6)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Mass (157)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Period (198)  |  Permit (58)  |  Present (619)  |  Separation (57)  |  Slow (101)  |  Space (500)  |  Stage (143)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Today (314)  |  Universe (857)  |  Value (365)  |  Zero (37)

The University of Cambridge, in accordance with that law of its evolution, by which, while maintaining the strictest continuity between the successive phases of its history, it adapts itself with more or less promptness to the requirements of the times, has lately instituted a course of Experimental Physics.
'Introductory Lecture on Experimental Physics', (1871). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 241.Course;Experiment;Cambridge;History;Promptness;Adapt;Requirement
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Course (409)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Feature (44)  |  History (673)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Primary (80)  |  Promptness (2)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Strict (17)  |  Successive (73)  |  Time (1877)  |  University (121)

Through it [Science] we believe that man will be saved from misery and degradation, not merely acquiring new material powers, but learning to use and to guide his life with understanding. Through Science he will be freed from the fetters of superstition; through faith in Science he will acquire a new and enduring delight in the exercise of his capacities; he will gain a zest and interest in life such as the present phase of culture fails to supply.
'Biology and the State', The Advancement of Science: Occasional Essays & Addresses (1890), 108-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Culture (143)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Delight (108)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Fail (185)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Gain (145)  |  Guide (97)  |  Interest (386)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Merely (316)  |  Misery (30)  |  New (1216)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Science (3879)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Supply (93)  |  Through (849)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

We are going through the body-snatching phase right now, and there are all these Burke and Hare attitudes towards geneticists-that they are playing God and that DNA is sacred. No, it’s not. It’s no more sacred than your toenails. Basically, we are not going to make long-term medical progress without understanding how the genes work.
[Referring to the similarity of fears and superstitions in genetics as once were associated with anatomy ]
Quoted by Sean O’Hagan, in 'End of sperm report', The Observer (14 Sep 2002).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Body (537)  |  DNA (77)  |  Fear (197)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  God (757)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Play (112)  |  Playing (42)  |  Progress (465)  |  Right (452)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Term (349)  |  Through (849)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)

We are led to think of diseases as isolated disturbances in a healthy body, not as the phases of certain periods of bodily development.
The Significance of Skin Affections in the Classification of Disease', St. Georges Hospital Reports (1867), Vol. 2, 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Development (422)  |  Disease (328)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Period (198)  |  Think (1086)

We are sorry to confess that biological hypotheses have not yet completely got out of the second phase, and that ghost of ‘vital force’ still haunts many wise heads.
From Force and Matter: Or, Principles of the Natural Order of the Universe (15th ed. 1884), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Completely (135)  |  Confess (42)  |  Force (487)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Haunt (5)  |  Head (81)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Second (62)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Still (613)  |  Vital (85)  |  Vital Force (7)  |  Wise (131)

When every fact, every present or past phenomenon of that universe, every phase of present or past life therein, has been examined, classified, and co-ordinated with the rest, then the mission of science will be completed. What is this but saying that the task of science can never end till man ceases to be, till history is no longer made, and development itself ceases?
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Cease (79)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Classification (97)  |  Completed (30)  |  Completion (22)  |  Coordination (9)  |  Development (422)  |  End (590)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  History (673)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mission (21)  |  Never (1087)  |  Past (337)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Present (619)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Task (147)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

When the child outgrows the narrow circle of family life … then comes the period of the school, whose object is to initiate him into the technicalities of intercommunication with his fellow-men, and to familiarize him with the ideas that underlie his civilization, and which he must use as tools of thought if he would observe and understand the phases of human life around him; for these … are invisible to the human being who has not the aid of elementary ideas with which to see them.
In Psychologic Foundations of Education: An Attempt to Show the Genesis of the Higher Faculties of the Mind (1907), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Being (1278)  |  Child (307)  |  Circle (110)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Education (378)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Familiarize (3)  |  Family (94)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Idea (843)  |  Initiate (13)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Life (1795)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  Outgrow (4)  |  Period (198)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Technicality (5)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tool (117)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Understand (606)  |  Use (766)

With an interest almost amounting to anxiety, geologists will watch the development of researches which may result in timing the strata and the phases of evolutionary advance; and may even-going still further back—give us reason to see in the discrepancy between denudative and radioactive methods, glimpses of past aeons, beyond that day of regeneration which at once ushered in our era of life, and, for all that went before, was 'a sleep and a forgetting'.
John Joly
Radioactivity and Geology (1909), 250-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Back (390)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Development (422)  |  Discrepancy (7)  |  Era (51)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Interest (386)  |  Life (1795)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Origin Of Earth (9)  |  Past (337)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regeneration (5)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Still (613)  |  Strata (35)  |  Watch (109)  |  Will (2355)

With crystals we are in a situation similar to an attempt to investigate an optical grating merely from the spectra it produces... But a knowledge of the positions and intensities of the spectra does not suffice for the determination of the structure. The phases with which the diffracted waves vibrate relative to one another enter in an essential way. To determine a crystal structure on the atomic scale, one must know the phase differences between the different interference spots on the photographic plate, and this task may certainly prove to be rather difficult.
Physikalische Zeitschrift (1913), 14. Translated in Walter Moore, Schrödinger. Life and Thought (1989), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Diffraction (5)  |  Enter (141)  |  Essential (199)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Interference (21)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Optical (11)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Position (77)  |  Prove (250)  |  Scale (121)  |  Situation (113)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Structure (344)  |  Task (147)  |  Vibrate (7)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)

[T]he phenomena of animal life correspond to one another, whether we compare their rank as determined by structural complication with the phases of their growth, or with their succession in past geological ages; whether we compare this succession with their relative growth, or all these different relations with each other and with the geographical distribution of animals upon the earth. The same series everywhere!
In Essay on Classification (1851), 196.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Compare (69)  |  Complication (29)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Geographical (6)  |  Geology (220)  |  Growth (187)  |  Life (1795)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Rank (67)  |  Relative (39)  |  Series (149)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (344)  |  Succession (77)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.