Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Phase

Phase Quotes (14 quotes)

Abstract as it is, science is but an outgrowth of life. That is what the teacher must continually keep in mind. … Let him explain … science is not a dead system—the excretion of a monstrous pedantism—but really one of the most vigorous and exuberant phases of human life.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 195-196.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Continually (14)  |  Dead (45)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Explain (61)  |  Human (445)  |  Life (917)  |  Monstrous (7)  |  Outgrowth (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  System (141)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Vigorous (11)

Even fairly good students, when they have obtained the solution of the problem and written down neatly the argument, shut their books and look for something else. Doing so, they miss an important and instructive phase of the work. ... A good teacher should understand and impress on his students the view that no problem whatever is completely exhausted.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (59)  |  Book (181)  |  Completeness (9)  |  Exhaustion (13)  |  Good (228)  |  Importance (183)  |  Impress (9)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Look (46)  |  Miss (16)  |  Obtain (21)  |  Problem (362)  |  Shut (5)  |  Solution (168)  |  Student (131)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Understanding (317)  |  View (115)  |  Work (457)  |  Writing (72)

From the rocket we can see the huge sphere of the planet in one or another phase of the Moon. We can see how the sphere rotates, and how within a few hours it shows all its sides successively ... and we shall observe various points on the surface of the Earth for several minutes and from different sides very closely. This picture is so majestic, attractive and infinitely varied that I wish with all my soul that you and I could see it. (1911)
As translated in William E. Burrows, The Survival Imperative: Using Space to Protect Earth (2007), 147. From Tsiolkovsky's 'The Investigation of Universal Space by Means of Reactive Devices', translated in K.E. Tsiolkovsky, Works on Rocket Technology (NASA, NASATT F-243, n.d.), 76-77.
Science quotes on:  |  Attractive (5)  |  Earth (487)  |  Infinitely (8)  |  Majestic (7)  |  Moon (132)  |  Observe (48)  |  Picture (55)  |  Planet (199)  |  Rocket (29)  |  Rotate (5)  |  See (197)  |  Soul (139)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Surface (74)  |  Varied (4)  |  Wish (62)

Looking back over the last thousand years, one can divide the development of the machine and the machine civilization into three successive but over-lapping and interpenetrating phases: eotechnic, paleotechnic, neotechnic … Speaking in terms of power and characteristic materials, the eotechnic phase is a water-and-wood complex: the paleotechnic phase is a coal-and-wood complex… The dawn-age of our modern technics stretches roughly from the year 1000 to 1750. It did not, of course, come suddenly to an end in the middle of the eighteenth century. A new movement appeared in industrial society which had been gathering headway almost unnoticed from the fifteenth century on: after 1750 industry passed into a new phase, with a different source of power, different materials, different objectives.
Technics and Civilisation (1934), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Civilisation (18)  |  Coal (41)  |  Complex (78)  |  Dawn (10)  |  Development (228)  |  Difference (208)  |  Headway (2)  |  Industry (91)  |  Machine (133)  |  Material (124)  |  Movement (65)  |  Objective (49)  |  Paleotechnic (2)  |  Power (273)  |  Society (188)  |  Technology (199)  |  Wood (33)

Many consider that the conflict of religion and science is a temporary phase, and that in due course the two mighty rivers of human understanding will merge into an even mightier Amazon of comprehension. I take the opposite view, that reconciliation is impossible. I consider that Science is mightier than the Word, and that the river of religion will (or, at least, should) atrophy and die.
In 'Religion - The Antithesis to Science', Chemistry & Industry (Feb 1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Amazon (6)  |  Atrophy (5)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Die (46)  |  Human (445)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Merge (2)  |  Reconciliation (9)  |  River (68)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Temporary (13)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Word (221)

Plasticity, then, in the wide sense of the word, means the possession of a structure weak enough to yield to an influence, but strong enough not to yield all at once. Each relatively stable phase of equilibrium in such a structure is marked by what we may call a new set of habits. Organic matter, especially nervous tissue, seems endowed with a very extraordinary degree of plasticity of this sort ; so that we may without hesitation lay down as our first proposition the following, that the phenomena of habit in living beings are due to plasticity of the organic materials of which their bodies are composed.
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 434.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (193)  |  Composition (52)  |  Endow (9)  |  Equilibrium (16)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Habit (78)  |  Influence (110)  |  Matter (270)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Organic (48)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Plasticity (4)  |  Stable (15)  |  Strong (47)  |  Structure (191)  |  Tissue (24)  |  Weak (36)  |  Word (221)  |  Yield (23)

The Moon and its phases gave man his first calendar. Trying to match that calendar with the seasons helped give him mathematics. The usefulness of the calendar helped give rise to the thought of beneficent gods. And with all that the Moon is beautiful, too.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 164.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Beneficent (6)  |  Calendar (5)  |  First (174)  |  God (454)  |  Match (13)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Moon (132)  |  Rise (51)  |  Season (24)  |  Thought (374)  |  Usefulness (70)

The most important thing we can do is inspire young minds and to advance the kind of science, math and technology education that will help youngsters take us to the next phase of space travel.
As summarized on a CNN web page - without quotation marks - from a statement by Glenn about the fourth National Space Day (4 May 2000). 'All systems go for National Space Day' on CNN website.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Education (280)  |  Help (68)  |  Important (124)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mind (544)  |  Science (1699)  |  Space Travel (13)  |  Technology (199)  |  Young (72)  |  Youth (57)

The University of Cambridge, in accordance with that law of its evolution, by which, while maintaining the strictest continuity between the successive phases of its history, it adapts itself with more or less promptness to the requirements of the times, has lately instituted a course of Experimental Physics.
'Introductory Lecture on Experimental Physics', (1871). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 241.Course;Experiment;Cambridge;History;Promptness;Adapt;Requirement
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (18)  |  Continuity (23)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Feature (34)  |  History (302)  |  Law (418)  |  Primary (29)  |  Promptness (2)  |  Quality (65)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Strict (7)  |  Successive (14)  |  University (51)

We are sorry to confess that biological hypotheses have not yet completely got out of the second phase, and that ghost of ‘vital force’ still haunts many wise heads.
From Force and Matter: Or, Principles of the Natural Order of the Universe (15th ed. 1884), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (21)  |  Completely (19)  |  Confess (9)  |  Ghost (20)  |  Haunt (3)  |  Head (52)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Second (33)  |  Sorry (16)  |  Vital Force (2)  |  Wise (43)

When every fact, every present or past phenomenon of that universe, every phase of present or past life therein, has been examined, classified, and co-ordinated with the rest, then the mission of science will be completed. What is this but saying that the task of science can never end till man ceases to be, till history is no longer made, and development itself ceases?
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Cessation (10)  |  Classification (79)  |  Completion (15)  |  Coordination (4)  |  Development (228)  |  Examination (60)  |  Fact (609)  |  History (302)  |  Life (917)  |  Mission (7)  |  Past (109)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Present (103)  |  Science (1699)  |  Task (68)  |  Universe (563)

When the child outgrows the narrow circle of family life … then comes the period of the school, whose object is to initiate him into the technicalities of intercommunication with his fellow-men, and to familiarize him with the ideas that underlie his civilization, and which he must use as tools of thought if he would observe and understand the phases of human life around him; for these … are invisible to the human being who has not the aid of elementary ideas with which to see them.
In Psychologic Foundations of Education: An Attempt to Show the Genesis of the Higher Faculties of the Mind (1907), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (189)  |  Circle (28)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Education (280)  |  Elementary (30)  |  Familiarize (3)  |  Family (37)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Human (445)  |  Idea (440)  |  Initiate (4)  |  Invisible (30)  |  Life (917)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Object (110)  |  Observe (48)  |  Outgrow (4)  |  Period (49)  |  School (87)  |  See (197)  |  Technicality (4)  |  Thought (374)  |  Tool (70)  |  Underlie (4)  |  Understand (189)

With crystals we are in a situation similar to an attempt to investigate an optical grating merely from the spectra it produces... But a knowledge of the positions and intensities of the spectra does not suffice for the determination of the structure. The phases with which the diffracted waves vibrate relative to one another enter in an essential way. To determine a crystal structure on the atomic scale, one must know the phase differences between the different interference spots on the photographic plate, and this task may certainly prove to be rather difficult.
Physikalische Zeitschrift (1913), 14. Translated in Walter Moore, Schrödinger. Life and Thought (1989), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Crystal (47)  |  Determination (53)  |  Diffraction (3)  |  Intensity (19)  |  Interference (12)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Photograph (17)  |  Position (54)  |  Scale (49)  |  Spectrum (23)  |  Structure (191)  |  Wave (55)

[T]he phenomena of animal life correspond to one another, whether we compare their rank as determined by structural complication with the phases of their growth, or with their succession in past geological ages; whether we compare this succession with their relative growth, or all these different relations with each other and with the geographical distribution of animals upon the earth. The same series everywhere!
In Essay on Classification (1851), 196.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Compare (15)  |  Complication (20)  |  Correspond (5)  |  Determine (45)  |  Different (110)  |  Distribution (21)  |  Earth (487)  |  Geographical (3)  |  Geology (187)  |  Growth (111)  |  Life (917)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Rank (19)  |  Relative (24)  |  Series (38)  |  Structure (191)  |  Succession (39)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.