Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Rust

Rust Quotes (7 quotes)

Consider the eighth category, which deals with stones. Wilkins divides them into the following classifications: ordinary (flint, gravel, slate); intermediate (marble, amber, coral); precious (pearl, opal); transparent (amethyst, sapphire); and insoluble (coal, clay, and arsenic). The ninth category is almost as alarming as the eighth. It reveals that metals can be imperfect (vermilion, quicksilver); artificial (bronze, brass); recremental (filings, rust); and natural (gold, tin, copper). The whale appears in the sixteenth category: it is a viviparous, oblong fish. These ambiguities, redundances, and deficiencies recall those attributed by Dr. Franz Kuhn to a certain Chinese encyclopedia entitled Celestial Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge. On those remote pages it is written that animals are divided into (a) those that belong to the Emperor, (b) embalmed ones, (c) those that are trained, (d) suckling pigs, (e) mermaids, (f) fabulous ones, (g) stray dogs, (h) those that are included in this classification, (i) those that tremble as if they were mad, (j) innumerable ones, (k) those drawn with a very fine camel's hair brush, (l) others, (m) those that have just broken a flower vase, (n) those that resemble flies from a distance.
Other Inquisitions 1937-1952 (1964), trans. Ruth L. C. Simms, 103.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alarming (4)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arsenic (10)  |  Belong (162)  |  Benevolent (9)  |  Broken (56)  |  Bronze (5)  |  Category (18)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Classification (97)  |  Coal (57)  |  Consider (416)  |  Copper (25)  |  Deal (188)  |  Distance (161)  |  Divide (75)  |  Divided (50)  |  Dog (70)  |  Encyclopedia (6)  |  Fish (120)  |  Flower (106)  |  Gold (97)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mad (53)  |  Marble (20)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mermaid (5)  |  Metal (84)  |  Natural (796)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Precious (41)  |  Quicksilver (7)  |  Remote (83)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Sapphire (3)  |  Slate (6)  |  Stone (162)  |  Tin (18)  |  Train (114)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Whale (32)

It is by the aid of iron that we construct houses, cleave rocks, and perform so many other useful offices of life. But it is with iron also that wars, murders, and robberies are effected, and this, not only hand to hand, but from a distance even, by the aid of missiles and winged weapons, now launched from engines, now hurled by the human arm, and now furnished with feathery wings. This last I regard as the most criminal artifice that has been devised by the human mind; for, as if to bring death upon man with still greater rapidity, we have given wings to iron and taught it to fly. ... Nature, in conformity with her usual benevolence, has limited the power of iron, by inflicting upon it the punishment of rust; and has thus displayed her usual foresight in rendering nothing in existence more perishable, than the substance which brings the greatest dangers upon perishable mortality.
Natural History of Pliny, translation (1857, 1898) by John Bostock and H. T. Riley, 205-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Arm (81)  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Cleave (2)  |  Construct (124)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Danger (115)  |  Death (388)  |  Display (56)  |  Distance (161)  |  Effect (393)  |  Engine (98)  |  Existence (456)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Foresight (6)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (328)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Iron (96)  |  Last (426)  |  Launch (20)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Missile (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Most (1731)  |  Murder (13)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Office (71)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Perish (50)  |  Power (746)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Regard (305)  |  Robbery (6)  |  Rock (161)  |  Spear (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Useful (250)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Wing (75)

It seems to be saying perpetually; 'I am the end of the nineteenth century; I am glad they built me of iron; let me rust.' ... It is like a passing fool in a crowd of the University, a buffoon in the hall; for all the things in Paris has made, it alone has neither wits nor soul.
About the Eiffel Tower.
Paris (1900). In Peter Yapp, The Travellers' Dictionary of Quotation: Who Said What, About Where? (1983), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Buffoon (3)  |  Century (310)  |  Eiffel Tower (12)  |  End (590)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fool (116)  |  Iron (96)  |  Passing (76)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Soul (226)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tower (42)  |  University (121)  |  Wit (59)

Just as iron rusts from disuse and stagnant water putrefies, or when cold turns to ice, so our intellect wastes unless it is kept in use.
C.A. 289 v. c. In Irma A. Richter and Thereza Wells (eds.), Leonardo da Vinci: Notebooks (1952, 1980), 245. Also translated as “Iron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigour of the mind,” in Edward McCurdy, The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (1939), Vol. 1, 89. Translated as “Just as iron rusts unless it is used, and water putrifies or, in cold, turns to ice, so our intellect spoils unless it is kept in use,” in Jean Paul Richter (trans.), The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (1888), Note 1177.
Science quotes on:  |  Cold (112)  |  Disuse (2)  |  Ice (54)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Iron (96)  |  Keep (101)  |  Stagnant (4)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)

The brain that isn’t used rusts. The brain that is used responds. The brain is exactly like any other part of the body: it can be strengthened by proper exercise, by proper use. Put your arm in a sling and keep it there for a considerable length of time, and, when you take it out, you find that you can’t use it. In the same way, the brain that isn’t used suffers atrophy.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (81)  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Body (537)  |  Brain (270)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Find (998)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proper (144)  |  Sling (4)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

The work … was … so blinding that I could scarcely see afterwards, and the difficulty was increased by the fact that my microscope was almost worn out, the screws being rusted with sweat from my hands and forehead, and my only remaining eye-piece being cracked… Fortunately invaluable oil-imraersion object-glass remained good.
From 'Researches on Malaria', Journal of the Raoyal Army Medical Corps (May 1905), 4, No. 5, 549.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Crack (15)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Hand (143)  |  Invaluable (11)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Object (422)  |  Oil (59)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Screw (17)  |  See (1081)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Work (1351)

We cannot rest and sit down lest we rust and decay. Health is maintained only through work. And as it is with all life so it is with science. We are always struggling from the relative to the absolute.
In Max Planck and James Vincent Murphy (trans.), Where is Science Going?, (1932), 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Decay (53)  |  Down (456)  |  Health (193)  |  Life (1795)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Relative (39)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Through (849)  |  Work (1351)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.