Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Following

Following Quotes (16 quotes)

Question: If you walk on a dry path between two walls a few feet apart, you hear a musical note or “ring” at each footstep. Whence comes this?
Answer: This is similar to phosphorescent paint. Once any sound gets between two parallel reflectors or walls, it bounds from one to the other and never stops for a long time. Hence it is persistent, and when you walk between the walls you hear the sounds made by those who walked there before you. By following a muffin man down the passage within a short time you can hear most distinctly a musical note, or, as it is more properly termed in the question, a “ring” at every (other) step.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 175-6, Question 2. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Before (6)  |  Bound (12)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Dry (12)  |  Examination (60)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Howler (15)  |  Long (95)  |  Man (345)  |  Music (66)  |  Note (22)  |  Paint (17)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Passage (14)  |  Path (59)  |  Persistence (16)  |  Question (315)  |  Reflector (3)  |  Short (31)  |  Similarity (17)  |  Sound (59)  |  Stop (56)  |  Term (87)  |  Time (439)  |  Walk (56)  |  Wall (20)

I always tried to live up to Leo Szilard's commandment, “don't lie if you don't have to.” I had to. I filled up pages with words and plans I knew I would not follow. When I go home from my laboratory in the late afternoon, I often do not know what I am going to do the next day. I expect to think that up during the night. How could I tell them what I would do a year hence?
In 'Dionysians and Apollonians', Science (2 Jun 1972), 176, 966. Reprinted in Mary Ritchie Key, The Relationship of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication (1980), 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Commandment (6)  |  Filling (6)  |  Home (58)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Lie (80)  |  Night (73)  |  Page (18)  |  Plan (69)  |  Leo Szilard (5)  |  Telling (23)  |  Try (103)  |  Word (221)  |  Year (214)

I undertake my scientific research with the confident assumption that the earth follows the laws of nature which God established at creation. … My studies are performed with the confidence that God will not capriciously confound scientific results by “slipping in” a miracle.
Quoted in Lenny Flank, Deception by Design: The Intelligent Design Movement in America (2007), 81. Also seen as cited from Arthur Newell Strahler, Science and Earth History: the Evolution/Creation Controversy (1987), 40-41.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (49)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Confounding (3)  |  Creation (211)  |  Earth (487)  |  Establish (30)  |  God (454)  |  Law (418)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Performance (27)  |  Research (517)  |  Result (250)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Study (331)  |  Undertaking (7)

In the beginning (if there was such a thing), God created Newton’s laws of motion together with the necessary masses and forces. This is all; everything beyond this follows from the development of appropriate mathematical methods by means of deduction.
Autobiographical Notes (1946), 19. In Albert Einstein, Alice Calaprice, Freeman Dyson , The Ultimate Quotable Einstein (2011), 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (18)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Development (228)  |  Everything (120)  |  Force (194)  |  God (454)  |  Laws Of Motion (3)  |  Mass (61)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Means (109)  |  Method (154)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)

In the preface to his great History of Europe, H. A. L. Fisher wrote: “Men wiser than and more learned than I have discerned in history a plot, a rhythm, a predetermined pattern. These harmonies are concealed from me. I can see only one emergency following upon another as wave follows upon wave …” It seems to me that the same is true of the much older [geological stratigraphical] history of Europe.
In The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record (1973), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Concealed (3)  |  Discerning (7)  |  Emergency (6)  |  Geology (187)  |  Harmony (55)  |  History (302)  |  Learned (20)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Plot (9)  |  Predetermined (3)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Stratigraphy (6)  |  Wave (55)  |  Wisdom (151)

In these researches I followed the principles of the experimental method that we have established, i.e., that, in presence of a well-noted, new fact which contradicts a theory, instead of keeping the theory and abandoning the fact, I should keep and study the fact, and I hastened to give up the theory.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 164.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Give Up (4)  |  Keeping (9)  |  New (340)  |  Presence (26)  |  Principle (228)  |  Research (517)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Study (331)  |  Theory (582)

It is often claimed that knowledge multiplies so rapidly that nobody can follow it. I believe this is incorrect. At least in science it is not true. The main purpose of science is simplicity and as we understand more things, everything is becoming simpler. This, of course, goes contrary to what everyone accepts.
Edward Teller, Wendy Teller, Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2002), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Becoming (13)  |  Belief (400)  |  Claim (52)  |  Contrary (22)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Everything (120)  |  Incorrect (6)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Main (16)  |  Multiplication (14)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Purpose Of Science (4)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Science (1699)  |  Simpler (5)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Thing (37)  |  Truth (750)  |  Understanding (317)

Only by following out the injunction of our great predecessor [William Harvey] to search out and study the secrets of Nature by way of experiment, can we hope to attain to a comprehension of 'the wisdom of the body and the understanding of the heart,' and thereby to the mastery of disease and pain, which will enable us to relieve the burden of mankind.
'The Wisdom of the Body', The Lancet (1923), 205, 870.
Science quotes on:  |  Attainment (35)  |  Body (193)  |  Burden (23)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Disease (257)  |  Experiment (543)  |  William Harvey (27)  |  Heart (110)  |  Hope (129)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Mastery (20)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pain (82)  |  Predecessor (18)  |  Relief (13)  |  Search (85)  |  Secret (98)  |  Study (331)  |  Wisdom (151)

Ordinarily logic is divided into the examination of ideas, judgments, arguments, and methods. The two latter are generally reduced to judgments, that is, arguments are reduced to apodictic judgments that such and such conclusions follow from such and such premises, and method is reduced to judgments that prescribe the procedure that should be followed in the search for truth.
Ampére expresses how arguments have a logical structure which he expected should be applied to relate scientific theories to experimental evidence. In James R. Hofmann, André-Marie Ampère (1996), 158. Cites Académie des Sciences Ampère Archives, École Normale lecture 15 notes, box 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (59)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Division (27)  |  Examination (60)  |  Generality (22)  |  Idea (440)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Latter (13)  |  Logic (187)  |  Method (154)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Premise (14)  |  Prescription (14)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Search (85)  |  Truth (750)

Ploughing deep, your recipe for killing weeds, is also the recipe for almost every good thing in farming. … We now plough horizontally following the curvatures of the hills and hollows, on the dead level, however crooked the lines may be. Every furrow thus acts as a reservoir to receive and retain the waters, all of which go to the benefit of the growing plant, instead of running off into streams … In point of beauty nothing can exceed that of the waving lines and rows winding along the face of the hills and vallies.
In letter (17 Apr 1813) from Jefferson at Monticello to Charles Willson Peale. Collected in The Jefferson Papers: 1770-1826 (1900), 178-180.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Crooked (3)  |  Curvature (3)  |  Deep (81)  |  Erosion (18)  |  Face (69)  |  Farming (7)  |  Furrow (3)  |  Good (228)  |  Growing (15)  |  Hill (19)  |  Hollow (3)  |  Horizontal (3)  |  Killing (14)  |  Level (51)  |  Line (44)  |  Plant (173)  |  Plough (8)  |  Ploughing (3)  |  Point (72)  |  Receive (39)  |  Recipe (7)  |  Reservoir (4)  |  Retain (10)  |  Row (4)  |  Running (8)  |  Stream (27)  |  Valley (16)  |  Water (244)  |  Water Conservation (2)  |  Weed (14)  |  Winding (4)

The history of acceptance of new theories frequently shows the following steps: At first the new idea is treated as pure nonsense, not worth looking at. Then comes a time when a multitude of contradictory objections are raised, such as: the new theory is too fancy, or merely a new terminology; it is not fruitful, or simply wrong. Finally a state is reached when everyone seems to claim that he had always followed this theory. This usually marks the last state before general acceptance.
In 'Field Theory and the Phase Space', collected in Melvin Herman Marx, Psychological Theory: Contemporary Readings (1951), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Claim (52)  |  Contradictory (4)  |  Fancy (16)  |  Finally (10)  |  First (174)  |  Fruitful (31)  |  General (92)  |  History (302)  |  Idea (440)  |  Merely (35)  |  Multitude (14)  |  New (340)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Objection (16)  |  Pure (62)  |  Raised (3)  |  Reach (68)  |  State (96)  |  Step (67)  |  Terminology (7)  |  Theory (582)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Wrong (116)

The most important distinction between the two qualities [talent and genius] is this: one, in conception, follows mechanical processes; the other, vital. Talent feebly conceives objects with the senses and understanding; genius, fusing all its powers together in the alembic of an impassioned imagination, clutches every thing in the concrete, conceives objects as living realities, gives body to spiritual abstractions, and spirit to bodily appearances, and like
“A gate of steel
Fronting the sun, receives and renders back
His figure and his heat!”
In 'Genius', Wellman’s Miscellany (Dec 1871), 4, No. 6, 203. The quotation at the end is from Wiliam Shakespeare, Tr. & Cress. iii, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (29)  |  Alembic (3)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Back (55)  |  Body (193)  |  Clutch (2)  |  Conceive (22)  |  Conception (63)  |  Concrete (21)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Feeble (21)  |  Figure (32)  |  Gate (8)  |  Genius (186)  |  Giving (11)  |  Heat (90)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Impassioned (2)  |  Importance (183)  |  Living (44)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Object (110)  |  Power (273)  |  Process (201)  |  Reality (140)  |  Receive (39)  |  Render (17)  |  Sense (240)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  Steel (14)  |  Sun (211)  |  Talent (49)  |  Together (48)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Vital (32)

The sciences have sworn among themselves an inviolable partnership; it is almost impossible to separate them, for they would rather suffer than be torn apart; and if anyone persists in doing so, he gets for his trouble only imperfect and confused fragments. Yet they do not arrive all together, but they hold each other by the hand so that they follow one another in a natural order which it is dangerous to change, because they refuse to enter in any other way where they are called. ...
Les Préludes de l'Harmonie Universelle (1634), 135-139. In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 316.
Science quotes on:  |  Apart (6)  |  Change (291)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Danger (62)  |  Fragment (24)  |  Hold (56)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Inviolable (2)  |  Natural (128)  |  Order (167)  |  Partnership (4)  |  Persistence (16)  |  Refusal (20)  |  Science (1699)  |  Separation (32)  |  Suffering (26)  |  Tear (20)  |  Together (48)  |  Trouble (55)

The year 1896 ... marked the beginning of what has been aptly termed the heroic age of Physical Science. Never before in the history of physics has there been witnessed such a period of intense activity when discoveries of fundamental importance have followed one another with such bewildering rapidity.
'The Electrical Structure of Matter', Reports of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1924), C2.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Age (137)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Bewilderment (4)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Hero (29)  |  History (302)  |  Importance (183)  |  Intensity (19)  |  Period (49)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Physics (301)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Term (87)  |  Witness (18)

[Animals] do not so much act as be put into action, and that objects make an impression on their senses such that it is necessary for them to follow it just as it is necessary for the wheels of a clock to follow the weights and the spring that pulls them.
[In his philosophy, he regarded animals to be merely automatons.].
'Traitez de la voix', Harmonie Universelle (1637), Vol. 1, prop. lii, 79. In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Action (151)  |  Animal (309)  |  Automaton (6)  |  Clock (26)  |  Impression (51)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Object (110)  |  Pull (11)  |  Sense (240)  |  Spring (47)  |  Weight (61)  |  Wheel (13)

[Euclid's Elements] has been for nearly twenty-two centuries the encouragement and guide of that scientific thought which is one thing with the progress of man from a worse to a better state. The encouragement; for it contained a body of knowledge that was really known and could be relied on, and that moreover was growing in extent and application. For even at the time this book was written—shortly after the foundation of the Alexandrian Museum—Mathematics was no longer the merely ideal science of the Platonic school, but had started on her career of conquest over the whole world of Phenomena. The guide; for the aim of every scientific student of every subject was to bring his knowledge of that subject into a form as perfect as that which geometry had attained. Far up on the great mountain of Truth, which all the sciences hope to scale, the foremost of that sacred sisterhood was seen, beckoning for the rest to follow her. And hence she was called, in the dialect of the Pythagoreans, ‘the purifier of the reasonable soul.’
From a lecture delivered at the Royal Institution (Mar 1873), collected postumously in W.K. Clifford, edited by Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock, Lectures and Essays, (1879), Vol. 1, 296.
Science quotes on:  |  Alexandria (2)  |  Beckoning (3)  |  Encouragement (17)  |  Euclid (28)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Guide (46)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Progress (317)  |  Reason (330)  |  Sacred (15)  |  Scientific Thought (6)  |  Soul (139)  |  Truth (750)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.