Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index U > Category: Upset

Upset Quotes (18 quotes)

Air Force Chief of Staff: Doctor, what do you think of our new creation, the … Corporation?
von Kármán: Why, General, I think that corporation has already had an effect on the whole industry.
Air Force Chief of Staff: I’m delighted. What effect is that?
von Kármán: Why, they’ve upset the salary schedule of the whole industry.
As quoted by William R. Sears in 'Some Recollections of Theodore von Kármán', Address to the Symposium in Memory of Theodore von Kármán, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, National Meeting (13-14 May 1964), Washington, D.C. Printed in Journal of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (Mar 1965), 13>, No. 1, 181. These are likely not verbatim words of Karman, but as recollected by Sears, giving an example of von Kármán’s willingness to speak truth to power.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (349)  |  Air Force (2)  |  Already (222)  |  Chief (97)  |  Corporation (6)  |  Creation (329)  |  Delight (109)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Effect (394)  |  Force (488)  |  General (511)  |  Industry (137)  |  New (1218)  |  Salary (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)

After a duration of a thousand years, the power of astrology broke down when, with Copernicus, Kepler, and Galileo, the progress of astronomy overthrew the false hypothesis upon which the entire structure rested, namely the geocentric system of the universe. The fact that the earth revolves in space intervened to upset the complicated play of planetary influences, and the silent stars, related to the unfathomable depths of the sky, no longer made their prophetic voices audible to mankind. Celestial mechanics and spectrum analysis finally robbed them of their mysterious prestige.
Franz Cumont, translated by J.B. Baker, Astrology and Religion Among the Greeks and Romans (1912, 2007), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (234)  |  Astrology (44)  |  Astronomy (231)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Celestial Mechanics (4)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (49)  |  Depth (94)  |  Down (455)  |  Earth (998)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Galileo Galilei (125)  |  Geocentric (6)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Influence (222)  |  Johannes Kepler (92)  |  Mankind (340)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (132)  |  Mysterious (80)  |  Mystery (178)  |  Planet (357)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Power (748)  |  Prestige (14)  |  Progress (468)  |  Rest (281)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Sky (163)  |  Space (501)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Star (430)  |  Stars (304)  |  Structure (346)  |  System (537)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Unfathomable (10)  |  Universe (861)  |  Year (932)

Art is meant to upset people, science reassures them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  People (1005)  |  Science (3880)

At this point, however, I have no intention whatever of criticizing the false teachings of Galen, who is easily first among the professors of dissection, for I certainly do not wish to start off by gaining a reputation for impiety toward him, the author of all good things, or by seeming insubordinate to his authority. For I am well aware how upset the practitioners (unlike the followers of Aristotle) invariably become nowadays, when they discover in the course of a single dissection that Galen has departed on two hundred or more occasions from the true description of the harmony, function, and action of the human parts, and how grimly they examine the dissected portions as they strive with all the zeal at their command to defend him. Yet even they, drawn by their love of truth, are gradually calming down and placing more faith in their own not ineffective eyes and reason than in Galen’s writings.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, iv, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), Preface, liv.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (328)  |  All (4107)  |  Aristotle (173)  |  Author (168)  |  Authority (96)  |  Become (815)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Command (58)  |  Course (408)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (786)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (455)  |  Examine (78)  |  Eye (423)  |  Faith (203)  |  False (100)  |  First (1284)  |  Follower (11)  |  Function (229)  |  Galen (19)  |  Good (889)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Human (1470)  |  Hundred (228)  |  Ineffective (5)  |  Intention (46)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Love (310)  |  More (2559)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Point (580)  |  Portion (84)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Professor (129)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Single (354)  |  Start (221)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Two (937)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wish (212)  |  Writing (189)  |  Zeal (11)

Einstein, my upset stomach hates your theory [of General Relativity]—it almost hates you yourself! How am I to provide for my students? What am I to answer to the philosophers?!!
Letter to Albert Einstein, 20 Nov 1919. In Martin J. Klein, Paul Ehrenfest: The Making of a Theoretical Physicist (1970), Vol. 1, 315.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Einstein (101)  |  General (511)  |  General Relativity (10)  |  Hate (65)  |  Philosopher (259)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Student (301)  |  Theory (972)

Error held as truth has much the effect of truth. In politics and religion this fact upsets many confident predictions.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Confident (24)  |  Effect (394)  |  Error (321)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Hold (95)  |  Politics (112)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Religion (363)  |  Truth (1062)

Get a shot off fast. This upsets him long enough to let you make your second shot perfect.
In 'From the Notebooks of Lazarus Long', Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 257.
Science quotes on:  |  Enough (341)  |  Fast (45)  |  Long (789)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Second (62)  |  Shoot (19)

Historical theories are, after all, intellectual apple carts. They are quite likely to be upset. Nor should it be forgotten that they tend to attract, when they gain ascendancy, a fair number of apple-polishers
'Books of the Times'. New York Times (9 Dec 1965), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Apple (40)  |  Ascendancy (3)  |  Attract (23)  |  Cart (3)  |  Forget (117)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Gain (145)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (675)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Number (701)  |  Polish (15)  |  Tend (124)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Theory (972)

I always feel like our descendants—they're going to be upset with us for wrecking the planet anyway—but they're really going to be mad that we didn't even bother to take a good picture. [On the importance of thorough research of even a little ant species.]
Quoted from NPR radio interview, also published on NPR web page by Christopher Joyce, Morning Edition (1 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Ant (29)  |  Bother (7)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Earth (998)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Feel (366)  |  Good (889)  |  Importance (288)  |  Little (708)  |  Mad (53)  |  Picture (143)  |  Planet (357)  |  Research (679)  |  Species (402)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Wreck (7)

I have no doubt that certain learned men, now that the novelty of the hypotheses in this work has been widely reported—for it establishes that the Earth moves, and indeed that the Sun is motionless in the middle of the universe—are extremely shocked, and think that the scholarly disciplines, rightly established once and for all, should not be upset. But if they are willing to judge the matter thoroughly, they will find that the author of this work has committed nothing which deserves censure. For it is proper for an astronomer to establish a record of the motions of the heavens with diligent and skilful observations, and then to think out and construct laws for them, or rather hypotheses, whatever their nature may be, since the true laws cannot be reached by the use of reason; and from those assumptions the motions can be correctly calculated, both for the future and for the past. Our author has shown himself outstandingly skilful in both these respects. Nor is it necessary that these hypotheses should be true, nor indeed even probable, but it is sufficient if they merely produce calculations which agree with the observations. … For it is clear enough that this subject is completely and simply ignorant of the laws which produce apparently irregular motions. And if it does work out any laws—as certainly it does work out very many—it does not do so in any way with the aim of persuading anyone that they are valid, but only to provide a correct basis for calculation. Since different hypotheses are sometimes available to explain one and the same motion (for instance eccentricity or an epicycle for the motion of the Sun) an astronomer will prefer to seize on the one which is easiest to grasp; a philosopher will perhaps look more for probability; but neither will grasp or convey anything certain, unless it has been divinely revealed to him. Let us therefore allow these new hypotheses also to become known beside the older, which are no more probable, especially since they are remarkable and easy; and let them bring with them the vast treasury of highly learned observations. And let no one expect from astronomy, as far as hypotheses are concerned, anything certain, since it cannot produce any such thing, in case if he seizes on things constructed for another other purpose as true, he departs from this discipline more foolish than he came to it.
Although this preface would have been assumed by contemporary readers to be written by Copernicus, it was unsigned. It is now believed to have been written and added at press time by Andreas Osiander (who was then overseeing the printing of the book). It suggests the earth’s motion as described was merely a mathematical device, and not to be taken as absolute reality. Text as given in 'To the Reader on the Hypotheses in this Work', Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), translated by ‎Alistair Matheson Duncan (1976), 22-3. By adding this preface, Osiander wished to stave off criticism by theologians. See also the Andreas Osiander Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (166)  |  All (4107)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Astronomer (94)  |  Astronomy (231)  |  Author (168)  |  Available (78)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (494)  |  Calculation (128)  |  Censure (5)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concern (228)  |  Construct (124)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Different (577)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (305)  |  Earth (998)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (341)  |  Expect (201)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (999)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Future (433)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Judge (108)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (895)  |  Learn (632)  |  Learned (235)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (801)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (312)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1218)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Observation (562)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Philosopher (259)  |  Probability (132)  |  Proper (145)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Record (155)  |  Respect (207)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Shock (37)  |  Solar System (78)  |  Subject (522)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Sun (388)  |  Theory (972)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Universe (861)  |  Use (766)  |  Vast (178)  |  Way (1216)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2354)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1352)

Journalism must find the facts, it must not prejudge things in terms of conservatism or liberalism or radicalism; it must not decide in advance that it is to be conformist or non-conformist; it cannot fly in the face of facts without courting ultimate disaster.
Journalism must focus the facts; facts are not important for their own sake; they are important only as a basis for action; journalism must focus the facts it finds upon the issues its readers face.
Journalism must filter the facts; it must with conscientious care separate the facts from admixtures of prejudice, passion, partisanship, and selfish interest; facts that are diluted, colored, or perverted are valueless as a basis for action.
Journalism must face the facts; it must learn that the energy spent in trying to find ways to get around, under, or over the facts is wasted energy; facts have a ruthless way of winning the day sooner or later.
Journalism must follow the facts; journalism must say of facts as Job said, of God: though they slay us, yet shall we trust them; if the facts threaten to upset a paper's cherished policy, it always pays the journalist to re-examine his policy; that way lies realism, and realism is the ultimate good.
From address as president of the Wisconsin local chapter of Theta Sigma Phi, at its first annual Matrix Table (9 Jan 1926). quoted in 'Journalism News and Notes', in Robert S. Crawford (ed.), The Wisconsin Alumni Magazine (Feb 1926), 27, No. 4, 101. If you know any other example of Glenn Frank speaking about his five themes on facts, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (328)  |  Advance (280)  |  Basis (173)  |  Care (186)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Color (139)  |  Conscientious (7)  |  Disaster (52)  |  Energy (346)  |  Examine (78)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Filter (9)  |  Find (999)  |  Fly (146)  |  Focus (35)  |  Follow (379)  |  God (758)  |  Good (889)  |  Importance (288)  |  Interest (386)  |  Issue (42)  |  Job (82)  |  Journalism (4)  |  Learn (632)  |  Lie (364)  |  Must (1526)  |  Paper (183)  |  Passion (114)  |  Pervert (7)  |  Policy (24)  |  Prejudice (88)  |  Realism (7)  |  Ruthless (10)  |  Sake (58)  |  Say (984)  |  Selfish (11)  |  Separate (143)  |  Slaying (2)  |  Spent (85)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Trust (67)  |  Trying (144)  |  Ultimate (146)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1216)  |  Winning (19)

No. I have been teaching it all my life, and I do not want to have my ideas upset.
Reply when James Clerk Maxwell’s asked if he would like to see an experimental demonstration of conical refraction. As given in James G. Crowther, The Cavendish Laboratory, 1874-1974 (1974), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Demonstration (115)  |  Do (1908)  |  Idea (846)  |  Life (1801)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Refraction (11)  |  Teach (278)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Want (497)

Our emphasis on science has resulted in an alarming rise in world populations, the demand and ever-increasing emphasis of science to improve their standards and maintain their vigor. I have been forced to the conclusion that an over-emphasis of science weakens character and upsets life's essential balance.
In 'The Wisdom of Wilderness', Life (22 Dec 1967), 63, No. 25, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Alarming (4)  |  Balance (78)  |  Character (243)  |  Conclusion (255)  |  Demand (123)  |  Emphasis (18)  |  Essential (200)  |  Life (1801)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Population (110)  |  Result (678)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3880)  |  Standard (57)  |  Vigor (9)  |  Vigour (18)  |  World (1778)

Research in neurophysiology is much more like paddling a small canoe on a mountain river. The river which is fed by many distant springs carries you along all right though often in a peculiar direction. You have to paddle quite hard to keep afloat. And sooner or later some of your ideas are upset and are carried downstream like an upturned canoe.
From Speech (10 Dec 1963) at the Nobel Banquet in Stockholm, Sweden. Collected inGöran Liljestrand (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1963, (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Afloat (4)  |  All (4107)  |  Canoe (2)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distant (33)  |  Downstream (2)  |  Hard (243)  |  Idea (846)  |  Keep (101)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (189)  |  Neurophysiology (2)  |  Paddle (3)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Research (679)  |  Right (452)  |  River (121)  |  Small (479)  |  Sooner Or Later (6)  |  Spring (133)

The apex of mathematical achievement occurs when two or more fields which were thought to be entirely unrelated turn out to be closely intertwined. Mathematicians have never decided whether they should feel excited or upset by such events.
In 'A Mathematician's Gossip', Indiscrete Thoughts (2008), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (180)  |  Apex (6)  |  Closely (12)  |  Decide (44)  |  Event (216)  |  Excited (8)  |  Feel (366)  |  Field (365)  |  Intertwined (2)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occur (150)  |  Thought (956)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Unrelated (6)

The notion that the “balance of nature” is delicately poised and easily upset is nonsense. Nature is extraordinarily tough and resilient, interlaced with checks and balances, with an astonishing capacity for recovering from disturbances in equilibrium. The formula for survival is not power; it is symbiosis.
In Encounter (Mar 1976), 16. As quoted and cited in Alan Lindsay Mackay , A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (2nd Ed., 1991), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Balance (78)  |  Balance Of Nature (4)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Easy (204)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Formula (98)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Notion (113)  |  Power (748)  |  Recover (11)  |  Survival (96)  |  Symbiosis (4)  |  Tough (19)

The politician … is sometimes tempted to encroach on the normal territory of the scientific estate. Sometimes he interferes directly with the scientist’s pursuit of basic science; but he is more likely to interfere when the scientist proposes to publish findings that upset the established political or economic order, or when he joins with the engineering or medical profession in proposing to translate the findings of science into new policies. … Who decides when the apparent consensus of scientific opinion on the relation of cigarettes to lung cancer is great enough to justify governmental regulatory action, and of what kind? In such issues the problem is less often whether politics will presume to dictate to science than it is how much politics is to be influenced by the new findings of science.
In The Scientific Estate (1965), 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (328)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Basic (139)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Consensus (8)  |  Decision (91)  |  Dictate (11)  |  Economic (81)  |  Engineering (176)  |  Enough (341)  |  Finding (30)  |  Government (111)  |  Great (1575)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Interference (21)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lung (34)  |  Lung Cancer (7)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1218)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Policy (24)  |  Political (121)  |  Politician (38)  |  Politics (112)  |  Problem (680)  |  Profession (102)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3880)  |  Science And Politics (15)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Scientist (826)  |  Territory (24)  |  Translate (19)  |  Will (2354)

To the average mathematician who merely wants to know his work is securely based, the most appealing choice is to avoid difficulties by means of Hilbert's program. Here one regards mathematics as a formal game and one is only concerned with the question of consistency ... . The Realist position is probably the one which most mathematicians would prefer to take. It is not until he becomes aware of some of the difficulties in set theory that he would even begin to question it. If these difficulties particularly upset him, he will rush to the shelter of Formalism, while his normal position will be somewhere between the two, trying to enjoy the best of two worlds.
In Axiomatic Set Theory (1971), 9-15. In Thomas Tymoczko, New Directions in the Philosophy of Mathematics: an Anthology (), 11-12.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Average (82)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Best (459)  |  Choice (110)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Difficulty (199)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Formal (34)  |  Formalism (7)  |  Game (101)  |  David Hilbert (46)  |  Know (1519)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (580)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1729)  |  Question (622)  |  Regard (304)  |  Security (47)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Theory (6)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Theory (972)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2354)  |  Work (1352)  |  World (1778)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.