Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index L > Category: Legitimate

Legitimate Quotes (14 quotes)

As a nation, we are too young to have true mythic heroes, and we must press real human beings into service. Honest Abe Lincoln the legend is quite a different character from Abraham Lincoln the man. And so should they be. And so should both be treasured, as long as they are distinguished. In a complex and confusing world, the perfect clarity of sports provides a focus for legitimate, utterly unambiguous support or disdain. The Dodgers are evil, the Yankees good. They really are, and have been for as long as anyone in my family can remember.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (35)  |  Both (81)  |  Character (118)  |  Clarity (41)  |  Complex (95)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Different (186)  |  Disdain (6)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Evil (79)  |  Family (47)  |  Focus (27)  |  Good (345)  |  Hero (35)  |  Honest (34)  |  Human Beings (21)  |  Legend (10)  |  Abraham Lincoln (11)  |  Long (174)  |  Nation (134)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Press (21)  |  Provide (69)  |  Real (149)  |  Really (78)  |  Remember (82)  |  Service (64)  |  Sport (11)  |  Support (78)  |  Treasure (45)  |  True (208)  |  Unambiguous (5)  |  Utterly (15)  |  World (898)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Young (100)

Business men are to be pitied who do not recognize the fact that the largest side of their secular business is benevolence. ... No man ever manages a legitimate business in this life without doing indirectly far more for other men than he is trying to do for himself.
Defining what makes a business legitimate. In Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit (1887), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Benevolence (6)  |  Business (84)  |  Fact (733)  |  Himself (12)  |  Life (1131)  |  Manage (15)  |  Pity (13)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Secular (9)

Evolution is a theory of organic change, but it does not imply, as many people assume, that ceaseless flux is the irreducible state of nature and that structure is but a temporary incarnation of the moment. Change is more often a rapid transition between stable states than a continuous transformation at slow and steady rates. We live in a world of structure and legitimate distinction. Species are the units of nature’s morphology.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (38)  |  Ceaseless (6)  |  Change (364)  |  Continuous (38)  |  Distinction (46)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Flux (13)  |  Imply (16)  |  Incarnation (3)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Live (272)  |  Moment (107)  |  Morphology (18)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Often (106)  |  Organic (55)  |  People (390)  |  Rapid (32)  |  Rate (29)  |  Slow (56)  |  Species (221)  |  Stable (17)  |  State (137)  |  Steady (16)  |  Structure (225)  |  Temporary (17)  |  Theory (696)  |  Transformation (54)  |  Transition (18)  |  Unit (31)  |  World (898)

I do not intend to go deeply into the question how far mathematical studies, as the representatives of conscious logical reasoning, should take a more important place in school education. But it is, in reality, one of the questions of the day. In proportion as the range of science extends, its system and organization must be improved, and it must inevitably come about that individual students will find themselves compelled to go through a stricter course of training than grammar is in a position to supply. What strikes me in my own experience with students who pass from our classical schools to scientific and medical studies, is first, a certain laxity in the application of strictly universal laws. The grammatical rules, in which they have been exercised, are for the most part followed by long lists of exceptions; accordingly they are not in the habit of relying implicitly on the certainty of a legitimate deduction from a strictly universal law. Secondly, I find them for the most part too much inclined to trust to authority, even in cases where they might form an independent judgment. In fact, in philological studies, inasmuch as it is seldom possible to take in the whole of the premises at a glance, and inasmuch as the decision of disputed questions often depends on an aesthetic feeling for beauty of expression, or for the genius of the language, attainable only by long training, it must often happen that the student is referred to authorities even by the best teachers. Both faults are traceable to certain indolence and vagueness of thought, the sad effects of which are not confined to subsequent scientific studies. But certainly the best remedy for both is to be found in mathematics, where there is absolute certainty in the reasoning, and no authority is recognized but that of one’s own intelligence.
In 'On the Relation of Natural Science to Science in general', Popular Lectures on Scientific Subjects, translated by E. Atkinson (1900), 25-26.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (98)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Aesthetic (35)  |  Application (170)  |  Attainable (3)  |  Authority (66)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Best (173)  |  Both (81)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (126)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Classical (16)  |  Compel (22)  |  Confine (26)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Course (84)  |  Decision (72)  |  Deduction (69)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Depend (90)  |  Dispute (22)  |  Education (347)  |  Effect (166)  |  Exception (40)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Experience (342)  |  Expression (110)  |  Extend (44)  |  Fact (733)  |  Far (154)  |  Fault (33)  |  Feel (167)  |  Find (408)  |  First (314)  |  Follow (124)  |  Form (314)  |  Genius (249)  |  Glance (20)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Grammatical (2)  |  Habit (112)  |  Happen (82)  |  Important (205)  |  Improve (56)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (221)  |  Indolence (7)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Intelligence (168)  |  Intend (16)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Language (228)  |  List (10)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (174)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Medical (24)  |  Often (106)  |  Organization (84)  |  Part (222)  |  Pass (93)  |  Philological (3)  |  Place (175)  |  Position (76)  |  Possible (158)  |  Premise (27)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Question (404)  |  Range (57)  |  Reality (190)  |  Reason (471)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Refer (14)  |  Rely (11)  |  Remedy (54)  |  Representative (14)  |  Rule (177)  |  Sadness (34)  |  School (119)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Strict (17)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (40)  |  Student (203)  |  Study (476)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Supply (47)  |  System (191)  |  Teacher (120)  |  Thought (546)  |  Traceable (2)  |  Training (66)  |  Trust (49)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Vagueness (11)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Whole (192)

I have no patience with the doctrine of “pure science,”—that science is science only as it is uncontaminated by application in the arts of life: and I have no patience with the spirit that considers a piece of work to be legitimate only as it has direct bearing on the arts and affairs of men. We must discover all things that are discoverable and make a record of it: the application will take care of itself.
In 'The Survey Idea in Country Life', collected in John Phelan, Readings in Rural Sociology (1920), 480.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Application (170)  |  Art (294)  |  Bearing (9)  |  Consider (81)  |  Direct (84)  |  Discover (199)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Life (1131)  |  Patience (39)  |  Piece (38)  |  Pure Science (24)  |  Record (68)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Work (635)

If I have put the case of science at all correctly, the reader will have recognised that modern science does much more than demand that it shall be left in undisturbed possession of what the theologian and metaphysician please to term its “legitimate field.” It claims that the whole range of phenomena, mental as well as physical—the entire universe—is its field. It asserts that the scientific method is the sole gateway to the whole region of knowledge.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 29-30.
Science quotes on:  |  Assertion (32)  |  Case (99)  |  Claim (71)  |  Correction (31)  |  Demand (76)  |  Field (171)  |  Gateway (4)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Left (13)  |  Metaphysician (7)  |  Mind (760)  |  Modern Science (17)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Possession (46)  |  Range (57)  |  Reader (40)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Region (36)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Sole (21)  |  Term (122)  |  Theologian (15)  |  Undisturbed (4)  |  Universe (686)  |  Whole (192)

In the 1860s, Pasteur not only applied his germ theory to create “Pasteurization,” rescuing France’s wine and vinegar industries, but also found both the cause and cure of silkworm disease, saving growers millions of dollars. When Napoleon asked the scientist why he had not legitimately profited by his findings, Pasteur replied: “In France scientists would consider they lowered themselves by doing so.”
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (77)  |  Ask (160)  |  Boneparte_Napoleon (2)  |  Cause (285)  |  Consider (81)  |  Create (153)  |  Cure (96)  |  Discover (199)  |  Disease (275)  |  Dollar (22)  |  France (27)  |  Germ (32)  |  Industry (109)  |  Lower (11)  |  Million (111)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Profit (39)  |  Reply (25)  |  Rescue (10)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Theory (696)  |  Vinegar (6)  |  Wine (28)

Scientists can only carry on with their work, addressing legitimate questions as they arise and challenging misinformation. … Scientists work to fill the gaps in human knowledge and to build a theory that can explain observations of the world. Climate sceptics revel in such gaps, sometimes long after they have been filled.
Editorial, Nature (28 Jul 2011), 475, 423-424.
Science quotes on:  |  Building (52)  |  Challenging (3)  |  Climate (43)  |  Climate Change (60)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Filling (6)  |  Gap (23)  |  Global Warming (26)  |  Human (550)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Misinformation (3)  |  Observation (450)  |  Question (404)  |  Research (590)  |  Revel (5)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Skeptic (8)  |  Theory (696)  |  Work (635)  |  World (898)

Suppose then I want to give myself a little training in the art of reasoning; suppose I want to get out of the region of conjecture and probability, free myself from the difficult task of weighing evidence, and putting instances together to arrive at general propositions, and simply desire to know how to deal with my general propositions when I get them, and how to deduce right inferences from them; it is clear that I shall obtain this sort of discipline best in those departments of thought in which the first principles are unquestionably true. For in all our thinking, if we come to erroneous conclusions, we come to them either by accepting false premises to start with—in which case our reasoning, however good, will not save us from error; or by reasoning badly, in which case the data we start from may be perfectly sound, and yet our conclusions may be false. But in the mathematical or pure sciences,—geometry, arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, the calculus of variations or of curves,— we know at least that there is not, and cannot be, error in our first principles, and we may therefore fasten our whole attention upon the processes. As mere exercises in logic, therefore, these sciences, based as they all are on primary truths relating to space and number, have always been supposed to furnish the most exact discipline. When Plato wrote over the portal of his school. “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here,” he did not mean that questions relating to lines and surfaces would be discussed by his disciples. On the contrary, the topics to which he directed their attention were some of the deepest problems,— social, political, moral,—on which the mind could exercise itself. Plato and his followers tried to think out together conclusions respecting the being, the duty, and the destiny of man, and the relation in which he stood to the gods and to the unseen world. What had geometry to do with these things? Simply this: That a man whose mind has not undergone a rigorous training in systematic thinking, and in the art of drawing legitimate inferences from premises, was unfitted to enter on the discussion of these high topics; and that the sort of logical discipline which he needed was most likely to be obtained from geometry—the only mathematical science which in Plato’s time had been formulated and reduced to a system. And we in this country [England] have long acted on the same principle. Our future lawyers, clergy, and statesmen are expected at the University to learn a good deal about curves, and angles, and numbers and proportions; not because these subjects have the smallest relation to the needs of their lives, but because in the very act of learning them they are likely to acquire that habit of steadfast and accurate thinking, which is indispensable to success in all the pursuits of life.
In Lectures on Teaching (1906), 891-92.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Accurate (35)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Act (117)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Art (294)  |  Attention (121)  |  Badly (15)  |  Base (71)  |  Best (173)  |  Calculus (51)  |  Case (99)  |  Clear (98)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Country (147)  |  Curve (33)  |  Data (120)  |  Deal (49)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deep (124)  |  Department (47)  |  Desire (142)  |  Destiny (36)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Direct (84)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discipline (53)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Discussion (48)  |  Draw (55)  |  Duty (68)  |  England (40)  |  Enter (32)  |  Erroneous (5)  |  Error (277)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Expect (44)  |  False (99)  |  First (314)  |  Follower (10)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Free (92)  |  Furnish (42)  |  Future (287)  |  General (160)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Give (201)  |  God (535)  |  Good (345)  |  Habit (112)  |  High (153)  |  Ignorant (40)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inference (32)  |  Instance (32)  |  Know (556)  |  Lawyer (23)  |  Learn (288)  |  Least (74)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1131)  |  Likely (33)  |  Line (90)  |  Little (188)  |  Live (272)  |  Logic (260)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (174)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mere (82)  |  Mind (760)  |  Moral (124)  |  Myself (36)  |  Need (287)  |  Number (282)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Plato (76)  |  Political (36)  |  Portal (4)  |  Premise (27)  |  Primary (41)  |  Principle (292)  |  Probability (106)  |  Problem (497)  |  Process (267)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Pure Science (24)  |  Pursuit (79)  |  Question (404)  |  Reason (471)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Region (36)  |  Relate (20)  |  Relation (154)  |  Respect (86)  |  Right (197)  |  Rigorous (23)  |  Same (156)  |  Save (56)  |  School (119)  |  Science (2067)  |  Simply (53)  |  Small (163)  |  Social (108)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sound (90)  |  Space (257)  |  Stand (108)  |  Start (97)  |  Statesman (18)  |  Steadfast (3)  |  Subject (240)  |  Success (250)  |  Suppose (49)  |  Surface (101)  |  System (191)  |  Systematic (33)  |  Task (83)  |  Think (347)  |  Thought (546)  |  Time (595)  |  Together (79)  |  Topic (12)  |  Training (66)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (208)  |  Truth (928)  |  Try (141)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  University (81)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Unseen (10)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Variation (63)  |  Want (176)  |  Weigh (14)  |  Whole (192)  |  World (898)  |  Write (154)

The argument of the ‘long view’ may be correct in some meaninglessly abstract sense, but it represents a fundamental mistake in categories and time scales. Our only legitimate long view extends to our children and our children’s children’s children–hundreds or a few thousands of years down the road. If we let the slaughter continue, they will share a bleak world with rats, dogs, cockroaches, pigeons, and mosquitoes. A potential recovery millions of years later has no meaning at our appropriate scale.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Appropriate (28)  |  Argument (82)  |  Bleak (2)  |  Category (12)  |  Child (252)  |  Cockroach (6)  |  Continue (65)  |  Correct (85)  |  Dog (44)  |  Down (86)  |  Extend (44)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Hundreds (6)  |  Late (52)  |  Let (61)  |  Long (174)  |  Mean (101)  |  Millions (17)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Pigeon (4)  |  Potential (39)  |  Rat (21)  |  Recovery (18)  |  Represent (43)  |  Road (64)  |  Scale (63)  |  Sense (321)  |  Share (49)  |  Slaughter (6)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Time (595)  |  View (171)  |  World (898)  |  Year (299)

The main duty of the historian of mathematics, as well as his fondest privilege, is to explain the humanity of mathematics, to illustrate its greatness, beauty and dignity, and to describe how the incessant efforts and accumulated genius of many generations have built up that magnificent monument, the object of our most legitimate pride as men, and of our wonder, humility and thankfulness, as individuals.
In The Study of the History of Mathematics (1936), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Describe (57)  |  Dignity (23)  |  Duty (68)  |  Effort (144)  |  Explain (107)  |  Generation (141)  |  Genius (249)  |  Greatness (42)  |  Historian (33)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Humility (23)  |  Illustrate (10)  |  Incessant (8)  |  Individual (221)  |  Magnificent (19)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Monument (26)  |  Pride (64)  |  Privilege (26)  |  Thankfulness (2)  |  Wonder (169)

The nineteenth century which prides itself upon the invention of steam and evolution, might have derived a more legitimate title to fame from the discovery of pure mathematics.
In International Monthly (1901), 4, 83.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (27)  |  Derive (33)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Fame (37)  |  Invention (324)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Pride (64)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Steam (30)  |  Title (18)

The surgeon is a man of action. By temperament and by training he prefers to serve the sick by operating on them, and he inwardly commiserates with a patient so unfortunate as to have a disease not suited to surgical treatment. Young surgeons, busy mastering the technicalities of the art, are particularly alert to seize every legitimate opportunity to practice technical maneuvers, the more complicated the better.
American Journal of Surgery.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Alert (6)  |  Art (294)  |  Better (192)  |  Busy (28)  |  Complicated (62)  |  Disease (275)  |  Maneuver (2)  |  Master (98)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Operate (17)  |  Opportunity (63)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Patient (125)  |  Practice (94)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Seize (15)  |  Serve (58)  |  Sick (27)  |  Suit (11)  |  Surgeon (45)  |  Surgical (2)  |  Technical (42)  |  Technicality (5)  |  Temperament (11)  |  Training (66)  |  Treatment (100)  |  Unfortunate (14)  |  Young (100)

Wherever there is the slightest possibility for the human mind to know, there is a legitimate problem of science.
In The Grammar of Science (1892), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Human Mind (82)  |  Know (556)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Problem (497)  |  Science (2067)  |  Slight (31)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.