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Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Insult

Insult Quotes (10 quotes)

Art creates an incomparable and unique effect, and, having done so, passes on to other things. Nature, upon the other hand, forgetting that imitation can be made the sincerest form of insult, keeps on repeating the effect until we all become absolutely wearied of it.
In 'Decay of Lying', The Writings of Oscar Wilde: Epigrams, Phrases and Philosophies For the Use of the Young (1907), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Art (294)  |  Become (172)  |  Create (153)  |  Effect (166)  |  Forget (63)  |  Form (314)  |  Imitation (23)  |  Incomparable (12)  |  Keep (100)  |  Nature (1223)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Pass (93)  |  Repeat (41)  |  Sincere (4)  |  Unique (41)  |  Weary (6)

In the dog two conditions were found to produce pathological disturbances by functional interference, namely, an unusually acute clashing of the excitatory and inhibitory processes, and the influence of strong and extraordinary stimuli. In man precisely similar conditions constitute the usual causes of nervous and psychic disturbances. Different conditions productive of extreme excitation, such as intense grief or bitter insults, often lead, when the natural reactions are inhibited by the necessary restraint, to profound and prolonged loss of balance in nervous and psychic activity.
Ivan Pavlov and G. V. Anrep (ed., trans.), Conditioned Reflexes—An Investigation of the Physiological Activity of the Cerebral Cortex (1927), 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Acuteness (3)  |  Balance (55)  |  Bitterness (3)  |  Cause (285)  |  Clash (8)  |  Condition (163)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Difference (246)  |  Disturbance (21)  |  Dog (44)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Extreme (56)  |  Function (131)  |  Grief (11)  |  Inhibition (10)  |  Intensity (20)  |  Interference (13)  |  Loss (73)  |  Man (373)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Nervousness (2)  |  Pathology (14)  |  Production (117)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Prolong (9)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Reaction (62)  |  Restraint (10)  |  Similarity (21)  |  Stimulus (20)  |  Unusual (16)

Injury was aggravated by insult, and insult was embittered by pleasantry.
From Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions (1841), Vol. 1, 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggravate (2)  |  Injury (23)

It is easy to overlook this thought that life just is. As humans we are inclined to feel that life must have a point. We have plans and aspirations and desires. We want to take constant advantage of the intoxicating existence we’ve been endowed with. But what’s life to a lichen? Yet its impulse to exist, to be, is every bit as strong as ours-arguably even stronger. If I were told that I had to spend decades being a furry growth on a rock in the woods, I believe I would lose the will to go on. Lichens don’t. Like virtually all living things, they will suffer any hardship; endure any insult, for a moment’s additions existence. Life, in short just wants to be.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (29)  |  Advantage (77)  |  Aspiration (27)  |  Belief (504)  |  Bit (22)  |  Constant (58)  |  Decade (32)  |  Desire (142)  |  Easy (102)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endure (20)  |  Exist (148)  |  Existence (299)  |  Feel (167)  |  Growth (124)  |  Hardship (4)  |  Human (550)  |  Impulse (33)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Intoxicating (2)  |  Life (1131)  |  Living Things (5)  |  Lose (94)  |  Moment (107)  |  Overlook (12)  |  Plan (87)  |  Point (123)  |  Rock (125)  |  Short (51)  |  Spend (43)  |  Strong (72)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Tell (110)  |  Thought (546)  |  Virtually (6)  |  Want (176)  |  Weve (13)  |  Wood (49)

Science burrows its insulted head in the filth of slaughterous inventions.
Article in the Evening Standard (Sep 1936). Maxims and Reflections (1947), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Invention (324)  |  Science (2067)  |  Weapon (66)

The chemical or physical inventor is always a Prometheus. There is no great invention, from fire to flying, which has not been hailed as an insult to some god. But if every physical and chemical invention is a blasphemy, every biological invention is a perversion. There is hardly one which, on first being brought to the notice of an observer from any nation which had not previously heard of their existence, would not appear to him as indecent and unnatural.
Lecture (4 Feb 1923) to the Heretics Society, Cambridge University, published in Daedalus; or, Science and the Future (1924), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (85)  |  Biology (168)  |  Blasphemy (6)  |  Chemist (89)  |  Existence (299)  |  Fire (133)  |  Flight (65)  |  God (535)  |  Hail (4)  |  Indecent (2)  |  Inventor (56)  |  Nation (134)  |  Observer (42)  |  Perversion (2)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Previously (11)  |  Prometheus (7)  |  Unnatural (10)

The time for offense is when a man, once he has cooled down, repeats an insult he has offered in his rage.
Aphorism as given by the fictional character Dezhnev Senior, in Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain (1987), 182.
Science quotes on:  |  Cool (13)  |  Down (86)  |  Offense (4)  |  Offer (43)  |  Rage (9)  |  Repeat (41)  |  Time (595)

To insult someone we call him “bestial.” For deliberate cruelty and malice, “human” might be the greater insult.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal Behavior (9)  |  Bestial (3)  |  Cruelty (16)  |  Deliberate (12)  |  Greater (42)  |  Human (550)  |  Malice (5)

To limit the press is to insult a nation; to prohibit reading of certain books is to declare the inhabitants to be either fools or slaves: such a prohibition ought to fill them with disdain.
From the original French, “Les semences des découvertes présentées à tous par le hazard, sont stériles, si l’attention ne les séconde,” in 'Notes', De l'Homme, de ses Facultés Intellectuelles, et de son Éducation (1773), Tome 1, 383. English version from Claude Adrien Helvétius and W. Hooper (trans.), 'Notes', A Treatise on Man, His Intellectual Faculties and His Education: A Posthumous Work of M. Helvetius (1777), Note 53, 375.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (257)  |  Censorship (3)  |  Certain (126)  |  Declare (27)  |  Disdain (6)  |  Fool (85)  |  Inhabitant (28)  |  Limit (126)  |  Nation (134)  |  Press (21)  |  Prohibit (2)  |  Reading (52)  |  Slave (28)

You have read my writings, and from them you have certainly understood which was the true and real motive that caused, under the lying mask of religion, this war against me that continually restrains and undercuts me in all directions, so that neither can help come to me from outside nor can I go forth to defend myself, there having been issued an express order to all Inquisitors that they should not allow any of my works to be reprinted which had been printed many years ago or grant permission to any new work that I would print. … a most rigorous and general order, I say, against all my works, omnia et edenda; so that it is left to me only to succumb in silence under the flood of attacks, exposures, derision, and insult coming from all sides.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (44)  |  Attack (41)  |  Defend (29)  |  Derision (8)  |  Exposure (7)  |  Express (65)  |  Flood (36)  |  Grant (32)  |  Inquisitor (6)  |  Order (242)  |  Permission (7)  |  Print (17)  |  Restrain (6)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Silence (43)  |  Succumb (5)  |  Year (299)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
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- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
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Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
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Isaac Newton



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