Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A people without children would face a hopeless future; a country without trees is almost as helpless.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Repulsive

Repulsive Quotes (7 quotes)

Do not imagine that mathematics is harsh and crabbed, and repulsive to common sense. It is merely the etherealisation of common sense.
'The Six Gateways of Knowledge', Presidential Address to the Birmingham and Midland Institute, Birmingham (3 Oct 1883). In Popular Lectures and Addresses (1891), Vol. 1, 280.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Harsh (7)  |  Mathematics (587)

Habit is thus the enormous fly-wheel of society, its most precious conservative agent. It alone is what keeps us all within the bounds of ordinance, and saves the children of fortune from the envious uprisings of the poor. It alone prevents the hardest and most repulsive walks of life from being deserted by those brought up to tread therein.
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 447.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Child (189)  |  Conservative (7)  |  Desert (27)  |  Envy (10)  |  Fortune (23)  |  Habit (78)  |  Hard (70)  |  Poor (46)  |  Society (188)  |  Tread (7)  |  Walk Of Life (2)

Histology is an exotic meal, but can be as repulsive as a dose of medicine for students who are obliged to study it, and little loved by doctors who have finished their study of it all too hastily. Taken compulsorily in large doses it is impossible to digest, but after repeated tastings in small draughts it becomes completely agreeable and even addictive. Whoever possesses a refined sensitivity for artistic manifestations will appreciate that, in the science of histology, there exists an inherent focus of aesthetic emotions.
Opening remarks of paper, 'Art and Artifice in the Science of Histology' (1933), reprinted in Histopathology (1993), 22, 515-525. Quoted in Ross, Pawlina and Barnash, Atlas of Descriptive Histology (2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Agreeable (6)  |  Appreciate (17)  |  Artistic (10)  |  Completely (19)  |  Compulsory (6)  |  Digest (5)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Dose (12)  |  Draught (2)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Exist (89)  |  Exotic (4)  |  Finished (3)  |  Focus (21)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Large (82)  |  Little (126)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Meal (14)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Obliged (4)  |  Possess (19)  |  Refined (6)  |  Repeated (4)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sensitivity (6)  |  Small (97)  |  Student (131)  |  Study (331)

Men cannot help feeling a little ashamed of their cousin-german the Ape. His close yet grotesque and clumsy semblance of the human form is accompanied by no gleams of higher instinct. Our humble friend the dog, our patient fellow-labourer the horse, are nearer to us in this respect. The magnanimous and sagacious elephant, doomed though he be to all fours, is godlike compared with this spitefully ferocious creature. Strangely enough, too, the most repulsive and ferocious of all apekind, the recently discovered Gorilla is, the comparative anatomist assures us, nearest to us all: the most closely allied in structure to the human form.
In 'Our Nearest Relation', All Year Round (28 May 1859), 1, No. 5, 112. Charles Dickens was both the editor and publisher of this magazine. The author of the article remains unknown. The articles were by custom printed without crediting the author. Biographers have been able to use extant office records to identify various authors of other articles, but not this specific one. Dickens and Richard Owen were friends; they read each other’s work. Owen is known to have found at least a little time to write a few articles for Dickens’ magazines. Owen had given a talk at the Royal Institution (4 Feb 1859) titled 'On the Gorilla.' This would suggest why Dickens may have had a definite interest in publishing on this subject, regardless of who in fact wrote the article.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (14)  |  Ape (39)  |  Assurance (8)  |  Clumsy (4)  |  Comparative (8)  |  Cousin (3)  |  Creature (127)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Dog (39)  |  Elephant (16)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Form (210)  |  Friend (63)  |  Gleam (9)  |  Gorilla (16)  |  Grotesque (3)  |  Horse (40)  |  Human (445)  |  Humble (23)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Nearest (4)  |  Patient (116)  |  Sagacious (2)  |  Semblance (3)  |  Shame (12)  |  Structure (191)

The more I think about the physical portion of Schrödinger’s theory, the more repulsive I find it…. What Schrödinger writes about the visualizability of his theory “is probably not quite right”; in other words it’s crap.
Letter to Wolfgang Pauli (8 Jun 1926). 17. In a subsequent letter to Pauli, he referred to Dirac’s theory as “learned crap.”
Science quotes on:  |  Opinion (146)  |  Erwin Schrödinger (65)  |  Theory (582)  |  Trash (2)

There can be but one opinion as to the beauty and utility of this analysis of Laplace; but the manner in which it has been hitherto presented has seemed repulsive to the ablest mathematicians, and difficult to ordinary mathematical students.[Co-author with Peter Guthrie Tait.]
In William Thomson Baron Kelvin, Peter Guthrie Tait, Treatise on Natural Philosophy (1879), Vol. 1, Preface, vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Analysis (123)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (50)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Student (131)  |  Utility (23)

To say that mind is a product or function of protoplasm, or of its molecular changes, is to use words to which we can attach no clear conception. You cannot have, in the whole, what does not exist in any of the parts; and those who argue thus should put forth a definite conception of matter, with clearly enunciated properties, and show, that the necessary result of a certain complex arrangement of the elements or atoms of that matter, will be the production of self-consciousness. There is no escape from this dilemma—either all matter is conscious, or consciousness is something distinct from matter, and in the latter case, its presence in material forms is a proof of the existence of conscious beings, outside of, and independent of, what we term matter. The foregoing considerations lead us to the very important conclusion, that matter is essentially force, and nothing but force; that matter, as popularly understood, does not exist, and is, in fact, philosophically inconceivable. When we touch matter, we only really experience sensations of resistance, implying repulsive force; and no other sense can give us such apparently solid proofs of the reality of matter, as touch does. This conclusion, if kept constantly present in the mind, will be found to have a most important bearing on almost every high scientific and philosophical problem, and especially on such as relate to our own conscious existence.
In 'The Limits of Natural Selection as Applied to Man', last chapter of Contributions to the Theory of Natural Selection (1870), 365-366.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparently (11)  |  Argue (17)  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Atom (251)  |  Attach (8)  |  Bearing (8)  |  Being (39)  |  Case (64)  |  Certain (84)  |  Change (291)  |  Clear (52)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Complex (78)  |  Conception (63)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Constantly (19)  |  Definite (27)  |  Dilemma (6)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Element (129)  |  Escape (34)  |  Especially (18)  |  Essentially (11)  |  Exist (89)  |  Existence (254)  |  Experience (268)  |  Fact (609)  |  Force (194)  |  Form (210)  |  Forth (4)  |  Found (11)  |  Function (90)  |  Give (117)  |  High (78)  |  Important (124)  |  Inconceivable (7)  |  Independent (41)  |  Latter (13)  |  Lead (101)  |  Material (124)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mind (544)  |  Molecular (3)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Outside (37)  |  Part (146)  |  Philosophical (14)  |  Presence (26)  |  Present (103)  |  Problem (362)  |  Product (72)  |  Production (105)  |  Proof (192)  |  Property (96)  |  Protoplasm (12)  |  Reality (140)  |  Really (50)  |  Relate (5)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Result (250)  |  Say (126)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Self-Consciousness (2)  |  Sensation (22)  |  Sense (240)  |  Show (55)  |  Solid (34)  |  Term (87)  |  Touch (48)  |  Understood (9)  |  Whole (122)  |  Word (221)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.