Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Found

Found Quotes (11 quotes)

La Chimie n’est pas une science primitive, comme la géométrie ou l’astronomie; elle s’est constituée sur les débris d’une formation scientifique antérieure; formation demi-chimérique et demi-positive, fondée elle-même sur le trésor lentement amassé des découvertes pratiques de la métallurgie, de la médecine, de l’industrie et de l’économie domestique. Il s’agit de l’alchimie, qui prétendait à la fois enrichir ses adeptes en leur apprenant à fabriquer l’or et l’argent, les mettre à l’abri des maladies par la préparation de la panacée, enfin leur procurer le bonheur parfait en les identifiant avec l’âme du monde et l’esprit universel.
Chemistry is not a primitive science like geometry and astronomy; it is constructed from the debris of a previous scientific formation; a formation half chimerical and half positive, itself found on the treasure slowly amassed by the practical discoveries of metallurgy, medicine, industry and domestic economy. It has to do with alchemy, which pretended to enrich its adepts by teaching them to manufacture gold and silver, to shield them from diseases by the preparation of the panacea, and, finally, to obtain for them perfect felicity by identifying them with the soul of the world and the universal spirit.
From Les Origines de l’Alchemie (1885), 1-2. As quoted by Harry Shipley Fry in 'An Outline of the History of Chemistry Symbolically Represented in a Rookwood Fountain', The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (1 Sep 1922), 14, No. 9, 868.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (28)  |  Amassed (2)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Constructed (3)  |  Debris (7)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Disease (257)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Economy (46)  |  Enrich (6)  |  Felicity (2)  |  Finally (10)  |  Formation (54)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Gold (55)  |  Half (35)  |  Identifying (2)  |  Industry (91)  |  Manufacture (12)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Metallurgy (2)  |  Obtain (21)  |  Panacea (2)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Positive (28)  |  Practical (93)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Previous (8)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Shield (4)  |  Silver (26)  |  Slowly (10)  |  Soul (139)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Universal (70)  |  World (667)

[When recording electrical impulses from a frog nerve-muscle preparation seemed to show a tiresomely oscillating electrical artefact—but only when the muscle was hanging unsupported.] The explanation suddenly dawned on me ... a muscle hanging under its own weight ought, if you come to think of it, to be sending sensory impulses up the nerves coming from the muscle spindles ... That particular day’s work, I think, had all the elements that one could wish for. The new apparatus seemed to be misbehaving very badly indeed, and I suddenly found it was behaving so well that it was opening up an entire new range of data ... it didn’t involve any particular hard work, or any particular intelligence on my part. It was just one of those things which sometimes happens in a laboratory if you stick apparatus together and see what results you get.
From 'Memorable experiences in research', Diabetes (1954), 3, 17-18. As cited in Alan McComa, Galvani's Spark: The Story of the Nerve Impulse (2011), 102-103.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Artefact (2)  |  Badly (9)  |  Behave (13)  |  Data (100)  |  Entire (29)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Frog (30)  |  Hang (13)  |  Happen (63)  |  Hard (70)  |  Impulse (24)  |  Insight (57)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Involve (27)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Muscle (32)  |  Nerve (66)  |  New (340)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Range (38)  |  Research (517)  |  Result (250)  |  See (197)  |  Send (13)  |  Sensory (2)  |  Serendipity (13)  |  Suddenly (4)  |  Think (205)  |  Unsupported (3)

But I should be very sorry if an interpretation founded on a most conjectural scientific hypothesis were to get fastened to the text in Genesis... The rate of change of scientific hypothesis is naturally much more rapid than that of Biblical interpretations, so that if an interpretation is founded on such an hypothesis, it may help to keep the hypothesis above ground long after it ought to be buried and forgotten.
Letter to Rev. C. J. Ellicott, Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol (22 Nov 1876). Quoted in Lewis Campbell and William Garnett, The Life of James Clerk Maxwell (1882), 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Bible (83)  |  Bury (8)  |  Change (291)  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Forget (40)  |  Genesis (13)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Sorry (16)

For the mind is so intimately dependent upon the condition and relation of the organs of the body, that if any means can ever be found to render men wiser and more ingenious than hitherto, I believe that it is in medicine they must be sought for. It is true that the science of medicine, as it now exists, contains few things whose utility is very remarkable.
In A Discourse on Method (1637) as translated by John Veitch, Everyman’s Library: Philosophy & Theology: A Discourse on Method, Etc. (1912, 1916), 49-50. A later translation of this quote begins “Even the mind…” on this web page.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (193)  |  Condition (119)  |  Dependent (14)  |  Ingenious (18)  |  Means (109)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Mind (544)  |  Organ (60)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Render (17)  |  Seek (57)  |  Utility (23)  |  Wiser (2)

Invention breeds invention. No sooner is the electric telegraph devised than gutta-percha, the very material it requires, is found. The aeronaut is provided with gun-cotton, the very fuel he wants for his balloon.
In Ralph Waldo Emerson and J.E. Cabot (ed.), Emerson's Complete Works (1884), Vol. 7, 161.
Science quotes on:  |  Balloon (8)  |  Breed (18)  |  Fuel (27)  |  Gutta-Percha (2)  |  Invention (283)  |  Material (124)  |  Provide (48)  |  Telegraph (31)

Line in Nature is not found;
Unit and Universe are round.
Poem, 'Uriel', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Poems (), 14
Science quotes on:  |  Line (44)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Round (15)  |  Unit (25)  |  Universe (563)

Money. It has such an inherent power to run itself clear of taint that human ingenuity cannot devise the means of making it work permanent mischief, any more than means can be found of torturing people beyond what they can bear. Even if a man founds a College of Technical Instruction, the chances are ten to one that no one will be taught anything and that it will have been practically left to a number of excellent professors who will know very well what to do with it.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (28)  |  Clear (52)  |  College (27)  |  Devise (11)  |  Excellent (15)  |  Human (445)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Making (26)  |  Means (109)  |  Mischief (6)  |  Money (125)  |  People (269)  |  Permanent (18)  |  Power (273)  |  Professor (39)  |  Taint (4)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Technical (26)  |  Torture (13)  |  Work (457)

Science is but the statement of truth found out.
In Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors, Both Ancient and Modern (1891), 507. Please contact Webmaster if you known the primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Science (1699)  |  Statement (56)  |  Truth (750)

The number of humble-bees in any district depends in a great degree on the number of field-mice, which destroy their combs and nests; and Mr. H. Newman, who has long attended to the habits of humble-bees, ... says “Near villages and small towns I have found the nests of humble-bees more numerous than elsewhere, which I attribute to the number of cats that destroy the mice.” Hence it is quite credible that the presence of a feline animal in large numbers in a district might determine, through the intervention first of mice and then of bees, the frequency of certain flowers in that district!
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (22)  |  Bee (21)  |  Cat (31)  |  Certain (84)  |  Depend (56)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Determine (45)  |  District (7)  |  Elsewhere (7)  |  Flower (65)  |  Food Chain (6)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Habit (78)  |  Intervention (8)  |  Mouse (24)  |  Nest (11)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Town (18)  |  Village (6)

To divide a cube into two other cubes, a fourth power, or in general any power whatever into two powers of the same denomination above the second is impossible, and I have assuredly found an admirable proof of this, but the margin is too narrow to contain it.
[Known as Fermat's Last Theorem, the proof of which remained elusive until 1994.]
Theorem, beside the eighth proposition of the second book of Diophantus, in Précis des Oeuvres Mathématiques de P. Fermat et de l'Arithmetique de Diophante (1853), 53-54. As translated by Vera Sandford in David Eugene Smith, A Source Book in Mathematics (1929), 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (11)  |  Contain (37)  |  Cube (9)  |  Denomination (3)  |  Divide (24)  |  Fourth (3)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Margin (5)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Power (273)  |  Proof (192)  |  Second (33)

To say that mind is a product or function of protoplasm, or of its molecular changes, is to use words to which we can attach no clear conception. You cannot have, in the whole, what does not exist in any of the parts; and those who argue thus should put forth a definite conception of matter, with clearly enunciated properties, and show, that the necessary result of a certain complex arrangement of the elements or atoms of that matter, will be the production of self-consciousness. There is no escape from this dilemma—either all matter is conscious, or consciousness is something distinct from matter, and in the latter case, its presence in material forms is a proof of the existence of conscious beings, outside of, and independent of, what we term matter. The foregoing considerations lead us to the very important conclusion, that matter is essentially force, and nothing but force; that matter, as popularly understood, does not exist, and is, in fact, philosophically inconceivable. When we touch matter, we only really experience sensations of resistance, implying repulsive force; and no other sense can give us such apparently solid proofs of the reality of matter, as touch does. This conclusion, if kept constantly present in the mind, will be found to have a most important bearing on almost every high scientific and philosophical problem, and especially on such as relate to our own conscious existence.
In 'The Limits of Natural Selection as Applied to Man', last chapter of Contributions to the Theory of Natural Selection (1870), 365-366.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparently (11)  |  Argue (17)  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Atom (251)  |  Attach (8)  |  Bearing (8)  |  Being (39)  |  Case (64)  |  Certain (84)  |  Change (291)  |  Clear (52)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Complex (78)  |  Conception (63)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Constantly (19)  |  Definite (27)  |  Dilemma (6)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Element (129)  |  Escape (34)  |  Especially (18)  |  Essentially (11)  |  Exist (89)  |  Existence (254)  |  Experience (268)  |  Fact (609)  |  Force (194)  |  Form (210)  |  Forth (4)  |  Function (90)  |  Give (117)  |  High (78)  |  Important (124)  |  Inconceivable (7)  |  Independent (41)  |  Latter (13)  |  Lead (101)  |  Material (124)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mind (544)  |  Molecular (3)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Outside (37)  |  Part (146)  |  Philosophical (14)  |  Presence (26)  |  Present (103)  |  Problem (362)  |  Product (72)  |  Production (105)  |  Proof (192)  |  Property (96)  |  Protoplasm (12)  |  Reality (140)  |  Really (50)  |  Relate (5)  |  Repulsive (7)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Result (250)  |  Say (126)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Self-Consciousness (2)  |  Sensation (22)  |  Sense (240)  |  Show (55)  |  Solid (34)  |  Term (87)  |  Touch (48)  |  Understood (9)  |  Whole (122)  |  Word (221)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.