Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Provoke

Provoke Quotes (9 quotes)

All sensitive people agree that there is a peculiar emotion provoked by works of art.
In Art (1913), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  People (1005)  |  Sensitive (14)  |  Work (1351)

As one recalls some of the monstrous situations under which human beings have lived and live their lives, one marvels at man’s meekness and complacency. It can only be explained by the quality of flesh to become calloused to situations that if faced suddenly would provoke blisters and revolt.
From Why We Behave Like Human Beings (1925), 469
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Explain (322)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Quality (135)  |  Situation (113)  |  Suddenly (88)

But most of us, however strict we may be, are apt to apply the epithet “beautiful” to objects that do not provoke that peculiar emotion produced by works of art.
In Art (1913), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Apt (9)  |  Art (657)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Do (1908)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Epithet (3)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Strict (17)  |  Work (1351)

But when science, passing beyond its own limits, assumes to take the place of theology, and sets up its own conception of the order of Nature as a sufficient account of its cause, it is invading a province of thought to which it has no claim, and not unreasonably provokes the hostility of its best friends.
Presidential Address (14 Aug 1872) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Brighton, reprinted in The Journal of the Society of Arts (16 Aug 1872), 20, No. 1030, 799, penultimate sentence.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Assume (38)  |  Best (459)  |  Best Friend (4)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cause (541)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conception (154)  |  Friend (168)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Invade (5)  |  Limit (280)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Place (177)  |  Province (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thought (953)

On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament], “Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?” I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
In 'Difference Engine No. 1', Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (1864), Chap. 5, 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Figure (160)  |  Idea (843)  |  Kind (557)  |  Machine (257)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Parliament (7)  |  Question (621)  |  Right (452)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

The starting-point for all systems of æsthetics must be the personal experience of a peculiar emotion. The objects that provoke this emotion we callworks of art.
In Art (1913), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Aelig (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Experience (467)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Personal (67)  |  Point (580)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  System (537)

The various systems of doctrine that have held dominion over man have been demonstrated to be true beyond all question by rationalists of such power—to name only a few—as Aquinas and Calvin and Hegel and Marx. Guided by these master hands the intellect has shown itself more deadly than cholera or bubonic plague and far more cruel. The incompatibility with one another of all the great systems of doctrine might surely be have expected to provoke some curiosity about their nature.
In 'Has the Intellect A Function?', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cholera (3)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Expect (200)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Plague (41)  |  Power (746)  |  Question (621)  |  Rationalist (5)  |  Surely (101)  |  System (537)  |  Various (200)

What quality is shared by all objects that provoke our aesthetic emotions? Only one answer seems possible—significant form. In each, lines and colors combined in a particular way; certain forms and relations of forms, stir our aesthetic emotions. These relations and combinations of lines and colours, these æsthetically moving forms, I call “Significant Form”; and “Significant Form” is the one quality common to all works of visual art.
In Art (1913), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Aelig (3)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Art (657)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Color (137)  |  Combination (144)  |  Combine (57)  |  Common (436)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Form (959)  |  Line (91)  |  Move (216)  |  Object (422)  |  Particular (76)  |  Possible (552)  |  Quality (135)  |  Relation (157)  |  Seem (145)  |  Share (75)  |  Significant (74)  |  Stir (21)  |  Visual (15)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

[Janos] Bolyai when in garrison with cavalry officers, was provoked by thirteen of them and accepted all their challenges on condition that he be permitted after each duel to play a bit on his violin. He came out victor from his thirteen duels, leaving his thirteen adversaries on the square.
In János Bolyai, Science Absolute of Space, translated from the Latin by George Bruce Halsted (1896), Translator's Introduction, xxix.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Adversary (6)  |  All (4108)  |  János Bolyai (6)  |  Cavalry (2)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Condition (356)  |  Duel (4)  |  Leave (130)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Officer (12)  |  Permit (58)  |  Play (112)  |  Square (70)  |  Victor (5)  |  Violin (6)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.