TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®  •  TODAYINSCI ®
Celebrating 24 Years on the Web
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence Quotes (12 quotes)
AI Quotes

A multidisciplinary study group ... estimated that it would be 1980 before developments in artificial intelligence make it possible for machines alone to do much thinking or problem solving of military significance. That would leave, say, five years to develop man-computer symbiosis and 15 years to use it. The 15 may be 10 or 500, but those years should be intellectually the most creative and exciting in the history of mankind.
From article 'Man-Computer Symbiosis', in IRE Transactions on Human Factors in Electronics (Mar 1960), Vol. HFE-1, 4-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Computer (131)  |  Creative (144)  |  Develop (278)  |  Development (441)  |  Do (1905)  |  Exciting (50)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Mankind (15)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Machine (271)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Military (45)  |  Most (1728)  |  Possible (560)  |  Problem (731)  |  Say (989)  |  Significance (114)  |  Solving (6)  |  Study (701)  |  Symbiosis (4)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Use (771)  |  Year (963)

A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God.
Epigrams of Programming
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Enough (341)  |  God (776)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Spend (97)  |  Spent (85)  |  Year (963)

Artificial intelligence is based on the assumption that the mind can be described as some kind of formal system manipulating symbols that stand for things in the world. Thus it doesn't matter what the brain is made of, or what it uses for tokens in the great game of thinking. Using an equivalent set of tokens and rules, we can do thinking with a digital computer, just as we can play chess using cups, salt and pepper shakers, knives, forks, and spoons. Using the right software, one system (the mind) can be mapped onto the other (the computer).
Machinery of the Mind: Inside the New Science of Artificial Intelligence (1986), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (96)  |  Brain (281)  |  Chess (27)  |  Computer (131)  |  Digital (10)  |  Do (1905)  |  Equivalent (46)  |  Game (104)  |  Great (1610)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Kind (564)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Other (2233)  |  Right (473)  |  Rule (307)  |  Salt (48)  |  Set (400)  |  Software (14)  |  Spoon (5)  |  Stand (284)  |  Symbol (100)  |  System (545)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Token (10)  |  Use (771)  |  World (1850)

Charles Babbage proposed to make an automaton chess-player which should register mechanically the number of games lost and gained in consequence of every sort of move. Thus, the longer the automaton went on playing game, the more experienced it would become by the accumulation of experimental results. Such a machine precisely represents the acquirement of experience by our nervous organization.
In ‘Experimental Legislation’, Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 754-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (51)  |  Acquisition (46)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Charles Babbage (54)  |  Become (821)  |  Chess (27)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Experience (494)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Gain (146)  |  Game (104)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Loss (117)  |  Machine (271)  |  Mechanical (145)  |  More (2558)  |  Move (223)  |  Nerve (82)  |  Number (710)  |  Organization (120)  |  Player (9)  |  Playing (42)  |  Precisely (93)  |  Proposal (21)  |  Register (22)  |  Registration (2)  |  Represent (157)  |  Representation (55)  |  Result (700)

Charlie Holloway (human): “What we hoped to achieve was to meet our makers. To get answers. Why they even made us in the first place.”
David (AI robot): “Why do you think your people made me?”
Charlie Holloway (human): “We made you because we could.”
David (AI robot): “Can you imagine how disappointing it would be for you to hear the same thing from your creator?”
Charlie Holloway (human): “I guess it’s good you can’t be disappointed.”
Prometheus (2012)
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (75)  |  Answer (389)  |  Creator (97)  |  David (6)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointed (6)  |  Do (1905)  |  First (1302)  |  Good (906)  |  Guess (67)  |  Hear (144)  |  Hope (321)  |  Human (1512)  |  Imagine (176)  |  Maker (34)  |  Meet (36)  |  People (1031)  |  Place (192)  |  Robot (14)  |  Same (166)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Why (491)

If a superior alien civilisation sent us a message saying, “We’ll arrive in a few decades,” would we just reply, “OK, call us when you get here—we’ll leave the lights on”? Probably not—but this is more or less what is happening with AI. Although we are facing potentially the best or worst thing to happen to humanity in history, little serious research is devoted to these issues outside non-profit institutes such as the Cambridge Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, the Future of Humanity Institute, the Machine Intelligence Research Institute, and the Future of Life Institute. All of us should ask ourselves what we can do now to improve the chances of reaping the benefits and avoiding the risks.
From article with byline attributing several authors collectively, namely: Stephen Hawking, Stuart Russell, Max Tegmark, Frank Wilczek, 'Stephen Hawking: `Transcendence looks at the implications of artificial intelligence—but are we taking AI seriously enough?’', Independent. Posted on the newspaper site www.independent.co.uk (01 May 2014). The article does not given an individual attribution to the quoter, so it is not clear if Stephen Hawking contributed it, and it is easily possible he did not. Thus this entry is filed under his name only because he is the first-listed in the byline.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (35)  |  Arrive (40)  |  Ask (420)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Bad (185)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Call (781)  |  Cambridge (17)  |  Chance (244)  |  Civilisation (23)  |  Decade (66)  |  Devote (45)  |  Existential (3)  |  Future (467)  |  Good (906)  |  Happen (282)  |  History (716)  |  Humanity (186)  |  Improve (64)  |  Institute (8)  |  Issue (46)  |  Life (1870)  |  Light (635)  |  Message (53)  |  More Or Less (71)  |  Ourself (21)  |  Potential (75)  |  Probably (50)  |  Reap (19)  |  Reply (58)  |  Research (753)  |  Risk (68)  |  Serious (98)  |  Superior (88)

Man is not a machine, ... although man most certainly processes information, he does not necessarily process it in the way computers do. Computers and men are not species of the same genus. .... No other organism, and certainly no computer, can be made to confront genuine human problems in human terms. ... However much intelligence computers may attain, now or in the future, theirs must always be an intelligence alien to genuine human problems and concerns.
Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to Calculation, (1976) 203 and 223. Also excerpted in Ronald Chrisley (ed.), Artificial Intelligence: Critical Concepts (2000), Vol. 3, 313 and 321. Note that the second ellipsis spans 8 pages.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (35)  |  Attain (126)  |  Attainment (48)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Computer (131)  |  Concern (239)  |  Confront (18)  |  Do (1905)  |  Future (467)  |  Genuine (54)  |  Genus (27)  |  Human (1512)  |  Information (173)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Machine (271)  |  Man (2252)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Organism (231)  |  Other (2233)  |  Problem (731)  |  Process (439)  |  Species (435)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)  |  Way (1214)

Artificial Intelligence quote: twas an apple fell from a tree
Perhaps ’twas an apple fell from a tree,
That inspired young Isaac, to see.
  The law of gravity it sparked,
  A breakthrough, it marked,
And physics was changed, eternally!
Text tweaked from an original limerick by Artificial Intelligence: ChatGPT. Newton image imagined by AI: midjourney. Both had prompts formed by Webmaster. (10 Feb 2023). The original limerick as output by AI was: “There was an apple, plucked from a tree,/That inspired Sir Isaac, to see,/The laws of motion it sparked,/A breakthrough, with a mark,/And physics was changed, eternally!” Webmaster made some edits for accuracy. “Perhaps 'twas…” since the falling apple story is likely just myth. Newton was indeed young at the time; not yet “Sir”. He realized that gravity crucially affects both a falling apple and the Moon falling around in orbit. The words “it marked” scan better. The rhyming, and clever final line are entirely from AI.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (46)  |  Breakthrough (18)  |  Change (639)  |  Eternally (4)  |  Fall (243)  |  Inspire (58)  |  Law Of Gravity (16)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Physics (564)  |  Spark (32)  |  Tree (269)  |  Young (253)

Artificial Intelligence quote: There once was a man with wild hair
There once was a man with wild hair
Whose equation was truly rare
  E equals M C squared
  And when people stared
He’d say, “It's all relative, I swear!”
Text by Artificial Intelligence: ChatGPT. Einstein caricature by AI: midjourney. Prompts by Webmaster (15 Feb 2023).
Science quotes on:  |  E=mc2 (2)  |  Albert Einstein (624)  |  Equation (138)  |  Limerick (7)  |  Relativity (91)

There ought to be something about computers and artificial intelligence [in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations]. Surely somebody somewhere said something memorable.
Quoted in Boston Globe (3 Jan1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Computer (131)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Quotation (19)  |  Quote (46)  |  Something (718)  |  Surely (101)

We shall therefore say that a program has common sense if it automatically deduces for itself a sufficient wide class of immediate consequences of anything it is told and what it already knows. ... Our ultimate objective is to make programs that learn from their experience as effectively as humans do.
'Programs with Common Sense', (probably the first paper on AI), delivered to the Teddington Conference on the Mechanization of Thought Processes (Dec 1958). Printed in National Physical Laboratory, Mechanisation of Thought Processes: Proceedings of a Symposium Held at the National Physical Laboratory on 24th, 25th, 26th and 27th November 1958 (1959), 78. Also Summary in John McCarthy and Vladimir Lifschitz (ed.), Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy (1990), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Class (168)  |  Common (447)  |  Common Sense (136)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Deduction (90)  |  Definition (238)  |  Do (1905)  |  Effective (68)  |  Experience (494)  |  Human (1512)  |  Immediate (98)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Learn (672)  |  Make (25)  |  Objective (96)  |  Say (989)  |  Sense (785)  |  Sufficient (133)  |  Ultimate (152)  |  Wide (97)

When intelligent machines are constructed, we should not be surprised to find them as confused and as stubborn as men in their convictions about mind-matter, consciousness, free will, and the like.
Concluding sentence from 'Matter, Mind, and Models', Proceedings of the International Federation of Information Processing Congress (1965), Vol. 1, 49. As quoted in Jeremy Bernstein, 'A.I.', The New Yorker (14 Dec 1981), 57, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Confusion (61)  |  Consciousness (132)  |  Construct (129)  |  Conviction (100)  |  Find (1014)  |  Free (239)  |  Free Will (15)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Machine (271)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Stubborn (14)  |  Will (2350)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Thank you for sharing.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.