Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index G > Category: Grapple

Grapple Quotes (10 quotes)

Sir Robert Chiltern: You think science cannot grapple with the problem of women?
Mrs. Cheveley: Science can never grapple with the irrational. That is why it has no future before it in this world.
In play, An Ideal Husband (1912, 2001), Act 1, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Future (429)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Never (1087)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Think (1086)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

I do not maintain that the chief value of the study of arithmetic consists in the lessons of morality that arise from this study. I claim only that, to be impressed from day to day, that there is something that is right as an answer to the questions with which one is able to grapple, and that there is a wrong answer—that there are ways in which the right answer can be established as right, that these ways automatically reject error and slovenliness, and that the learner is able himself to manipulate these ways and to arrive at the establishment of the true as opposed to the untrue, this relentless hewing to the line and stopping at the line, must color distinctly the thought life of the pupil with more than a tinge of morality. … To be neighborly with truth, to feel one’s self somewhat facile in ways of recognizing and establishing what is right, what is correct, to find the wrong persistently and unfailingly rejected as of no value, to feel that one can apply these ways for himself, that one can think and work independently, have a real, a positive, and a purifying effect upon moral character. They are the quiet, steady undertones of the work that always appeal to the learner for the sanction of his best judgment, and these are the really significant matters in school work. It is not the noise and bluster, not even the dramatics or the polemics from the teacher’s desk, that abide longest and leave the deepest and stablest imprint upon character. It is these still, small voices that speak unmistakably for the right and against the wrong and the erroneous that really form human character. When the school subjects are arranged on the basis of the degree to which they contribute to the moral upbuilding of human character good arithmetic will be well up the list.
In Arithmetic in Public Education (1909), 18. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 69.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Basis (173)  |  Best (459)  |  Bluster (2)  |  Build (204)  |  Character (243)  |  Chief (97)  |  Claim (146)  |  Color (137)  |  Consist (223)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desk (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dramatic (17)  |  Effect (393)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Establish (57)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Facile (4)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Imprint (4)  |  Independently (24)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Learner (10)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Life (1795)  |  List (10)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Manipulate (10)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Noise (37)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Polemic (3)  |  Positive (94)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Question (621)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Relentless (8)  |  Right (452)  |  Sanction (7)  |  School (219)  |  Self (267)  |  Significant (74)  |  Slovenliness (2)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stable (30)  |  Steady (44)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undertone (2)  |  Unmistakable (6)  |  Untrue (12)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Voice (52)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

I think that our cooperative conservation approaches get people to sit down and grapple with problem solving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Cooperative (3)  |  Down (456)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sit (48)  |  Solve (130)  |  Think (1086)

It would seem at first sight as if the rapid expansion of the region of mathematics must be a source of danger to its future progress. Not only does the area widen but the subjects of study increase rapidly in number, and the work of the mathematician tends to become more and more specialized. It is, of course, merely a brilliant exaggeration to say that no mathematician is able to understand the work of any other mathematician, but it is certainly true that it is daily becoming more and more difficult for a mathematician to keep himself acquainted, even in a general way, with the progress of any of the branches of mathematics except those which form the field of his own labours. I believe, however, that the increasing extent of the territory of mathematics will always be counteracted by increased facilities in the means of communication. Additional knowledge opens to us new principles and methods which may conduct us with the greatest ease to results which previously were most difficult of access; and improvements in notation may exercise the most powerful effects both in the simplification and accessibility of a subject. It rests with the worker in mathematics not only to explore new truths, but to devise the language by which they may be discovered and expressed; and the genius of a great mathematician displays itself no less in the notation he invents for deciphering his subject than in the results attained. … I have great faith in the power of well-chosen notation to simplify complicated theories and to bring remote ones near and I think it is safe to predict that the increased knowledge of principles and the resulting improvements in the symbolic language of mathematics will always enable us to grapple satisfactorily with the difficulties arising from the mere extent of the subject.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A., (1890), Nature, 42, 466.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  Accessibility (3)  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Additional (6)  |  Area (31)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arising (22)  |  Attain (125)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Branch (150)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Bring (90)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Communication (94)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Counteract (4)  |  Course (409)  |  Daily (87)  |  Danger (115)  |  Decipher (7)  |  Devise (14)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Display (56)  |  Ease (35)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enable (119)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Express (186)  |  Extent (139)  |  Facility (11)  |  Faith (203)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  First Sight (6)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Himself (461)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Increase (210)  |  Invent (51)  |  Keep (101)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Language (293)  |  Less (103)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Notation (27)  |  Number (699)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Predict (79)  |  Previously (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Region (36)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Safe (54)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Say (984)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sight (132)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Simplify (13)  |  Source (93)  |  Specialized (8)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Tend (124)  |  Territory (24)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Way (1217)  |  Well-Chosen (2)  |  Widen (10)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)

No scientist is admired for failing in the attempt to solve problems that lie beyond his competence. … Good scientists study the most important problems they think they can solve. It is, after all, their professional business to solve problems, not merely to grapple with them.
The Art of the Soluble: Creativity and Originality in Science (1967), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Business (149)  |  Competence (11)  |  Failure (161)  |  Good (889)  |  Grappling (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Lie (364)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professional (70)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)

The point [is] largely scientific in character …[concerning] the methods which can be invented or adopted or discovered to enable the Earth to control the Air, to enable defence from the ground to exercise control—indeed dominance—upon aeroplanes high above its surface. … science is always able to provide something. We were told that it was impossible to grapple with submarines, but methods were found … Many things were adopted in war which we were told were technically impossible, but patience, perseverance, and above all the spur of necessity under war conditions, made men’s brains act with greater vigour, and science responded to the demands.
[Remarks made in the House of Commons on 7 June 1935. His speculation was later proved correct with the subsequent development of radar during World War II, which was vital in the air defence of Britain.]
Quoting himself in The Second World War: The Gathering Storm (1948, 1986), Vol. 1, 134.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Air (347)  |  Airplane (41)  |  All (4108)  |  Brain (270)  |  Britain (24)  |  Character (243)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Defence (14)  |  Defense (23)  |  Demand (123)  |  Development (422)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enable (119)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Greater (288)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  House (140)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Invention (369)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Patience (56)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Point (580)  |  Radar (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Something (719)  |  Sonar (2)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Submarine (12)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Surface (209)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Vital (85)  |  War (225)  |  World (1774)

The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true. We have a method, and that method helps us to reach not absolute truth, only asymptotic approaches to the truth—never there, just closer and closer, always finding vast new oceans of undiscovered possibilities. Cleverly designed experiments are the key.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Approach (108)  |  Asymptote (2)  |  Asymptotic (2)  |  Cleverness (15)  |  Closer (43)  |  Consonant (3)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Counterintuitive (4)  |  Design (195)  |  Desperation (6)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Finding (30)  |  Key (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Preference (28)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Puzzling (8)  |  Reach (281)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Vast (177)  |  Want (497)  |  Work (1351)

Though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field…. Let her and Falsehood grapple; who ever knew Truth put to the worse, in a free and open encounter?
In Areopagitica: A speech of Mr John Milton for the Liberty of Unlicenced printing to the Parliament of England (23 Nov 1644), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Earth (996)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Field (364)  |  Free (232)  |  Open (274)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wind (128)  |  Worse (24)

We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Do (1908)  |  Future (429)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Improve (58)  |  Learn (629)  |  Pass (238)  |  Problem (676)  |  Race (268)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Tens (3)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unreasonable (5)  |  Year (933)

When Newton saw an apple fall, he found
In that slight startle from his contemplation—
'Tis said (for I'll not answer above ground
For any sage's creed or calculation)—
A mode of proving that the earth turn'd round
In a most natural whirl, called 'gravitation';
And this is the sole mortal who could grapple,
Since Adam, with a fall, or with an apple.
Don Juan (1821), Canto 10, Verse I. In Jerome J. McGann (ed.), Lord Byron: The Complete Poetical Works (1986), Vol. 5, 437.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apple (40)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Call (769)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Creed (27)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fall (230)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Ground (217)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Sage (23)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sole (49)  |  Turn (447)  |  Whirl (8)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.