Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Sunrise

Sunrise Quotes (12 quotes)

A first step in the study of civilization is to dissect it into details, and to classify these in their proper groups. Thus, in examining weapons, they are to be classed under spear, club, sling, bow and arrow, and so forth; among textile arts are to be ranged matting, netting, and several grades of making and weaving threads; myths are divided under such headings as myths of sunrise and sunset, eclipse-myths, earthquake-myths, local myths which account for the names of places by some fanciful tale, eponymic myths which account for the parentage of a tribe by turning its name into the name of an imaginary ancestor; under rites and ceremonies occur such practices as the various kinds of sacrifice to the ghosts of the dead and to other spiritual beings, the turning to the east in worship, the purification of ceremonial or moral uncleanness by means of water or fire. Such are a few miscellaneous examples from a list of hundreds … To the ethnographer, the bow and arrow is the species, the habit of flattening children’s skulls is a species, the practice of reckoning numbers by tens is a species. The geographical distribution of these things, and their transmission from region to region, have to be studied as the naturalist studies the geography of his botanical and zoological species.
In Primitive Culture (1871), Vol. 1, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (40)  |  Arrow (13)  |  Botany (51)  |  Bow (10)  |  Ceremony (6)  |  Child (244)  |  Civilization (174)  |  Classification (85)  |  Club (4)  |  Death (297)  |  Distribution (29)  |  Earthquake (29)  |  Eclipse (20)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Fire (132)  |  Geography (27)  |  Ghost (25)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Means (167)  |  Moral (121)  |  Myth (48)  |  Name (164)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Parent (45)  |  Purification (6)  |  Rite (3)  |  Sacrifice (32)  |  Skull (5)  |  Sling (3)  |  Spear (6)  |  Species (217)  |  Spiritual (55)  |  Step (108)  |  Study (456)  |  Sunset (22)  |  Tale (15)  |  Textile (2)  |  Thread (18)  |  Transmission (25)  |  Tribe (12)  |  Various (46)  |  Water (289)  |  Weapon (66)  |  Weaving (2)  |  Worship (24)  |  Zoological (5)

A fox looked at his shadow at sunrise and said, “I will have a camel for lunch today.” And all morning he went about looking for camels. But at noon he saw his shadow again - and he said, “A mouse will do.”
In Kahlil Gibran: The Collected Works (207), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Camel (11)  |  Fox (8)  |  Lunch (3)  |  Morning (43)  |  Mouse (26)  |  Noon (6)  |  Say (226)  |  See (368)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Today (115)

Gradually, at various points in our childhoods, we discover different forms of conviction. There’s the rock-hard certainty of personal experience (“I put my finger in the fire and it hurt,”), which is probably the earliest kind we learn. Then there’s the logically convincing, which we probably come to first through maths, in the context of Pythagoras’s theorem or something similar, and which, if we first encounter it at exactly the right moment, bursts on our minds like sunrise with the whole universe playing a great chord of C Major.
In short essay, 'Dawkins, Fairy Tales, and Evidence', 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Bursting (3)  |  Childhood (28)  |  Chord (3)  |  Conviction (69)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Evidence (179)  |  Experience (329)  |  Finger (43)  |  Fire (132)  |  Learning (177)  |  Logic (244)  |  Mathematics (1130)  |  Mind (733)  |  Music (95)  |  Playing (3)  |  Pythagoras (34)  |  Theorem (88)  |  Universe (678)

I don't really care how time is reckoned so long as there is some agreement about it, but I object to being told that I am saving daylight when my reason tells me that I am doing nothing of the kind. I even object to the implication that I am wasting something valuable if I stay in bed after the sun has risen. As an admirer of moonlight I resent the bossy insistence of those who want to reduce my time for enjoying it. At the back of the Daylight Saving scheme I detect the bony, blue-fingered hand of Puritanism, eager to push people into bed earlier, and get them up earlier, to make them healthy, wealthy and wise in spite of themselves.
In The Diary of Samuel Marchbanks (1947), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirer (7)  |  Agreement (38)  |  Bed (22)  |  Blue (56)  |  Care (95)  |  Daylight Saving Time (10)  |  Detection (12)  |  Eager (15)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Enjoyment (29)  |  Finger (43)  |  Hand (140)  |  Healthy (25)  |  Insistence (10)  |  Moonlight (5)  |  Object (167)  |  Reason (449)  |  Reckoning (4)  |  Reduction (41)  |  Resent (4)  |  Scheme (25)  |  Value (234)  |  Waste (64)  |  Wealthy (5)  |  Wise (58)

I have seen a thousand sunsets and sunrises, on land where it floods forest and mountains with honey coloured light, at sea where it rises and sets like a blood orange in a multicoloured nest of cloud, slipping in and out of the vast ocean. I have seen a thousand moons: harvest moons like gold coins, winter moons as white as ice chips, new moons like baby swans’ feathers.
Letter to Lee McGeorge (31 Jul 1978). Collected in Letters of Note: Volume 2: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence (2016), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (20)  |  Blood (103)  |  Chip (4)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Coin (11)  |  Color (98)  |  Feather (12)  |  Flood (36)  |  Forest (104)  |  Gold (68)  |  Honey (10)  |  Ice (33)  |  Land (115)  |  Light (345)  |  Moon (199)  |  Mountain (144)  |  Nest (17)  |  New (477)  |  Ocean (148)  |  Orange (11)  |  Rise (70)  |  Sea (186)  |  See (368)  |  Set (97)  |  Slip (5)  |  Sunset (22)  |  Swan (3)  |  Thousand (151)  |  Vast (88)  |  White (55)  |  Winter (30)

It was about three o’clock at night when the final result of the calculation [which gave birth to quantum mechanics] lay before me ... At first I was deeply shaken ... I was so excited that I could not think of sleep. So I left the house ... and awaited the sunrise on top of a rock.
[That was “the night of Heligoland”.]
Quoted in Abraham Pais, Niels Bohr’s Times: in Physics, Philosophy, and Polity (1991), 275. Cited in Mauro Dardo, Nobel Laureates and Twentieth-Century Physics (2004), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (98)  |  Excitement (39)  |  Night (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (37)  |  Rock (125)  |  Sleep (57)

The experience was more fulfilling than I could have ever imagined. I have a newfound sense of wonder seeing the Earth and stars from such an incredible perspective. Certainly, through my training I was prepared for the technical aspects, but I had no idea that I would be flooded with such amazement and joy after seeing my first sunrise and sunset from space.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Amazement (12)  |  Aspect (54)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Earth (632)  |  Experience (329)  |  First (306)  |  Flood (36)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Idea (573)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Incredible (21)  |  Joy (88)  |  Perspective (22)  |  Prepare (34)  |  See (368)  |  Sense (310)  |  Space (256)  |  Star (335)  |  Sunset (22)  |  Technical (40)  |  Training (62)  |  Wonder (168)

The history of aëronautic adventure affords a curious illustration of the same [dip of the horizon] principle. The late Mr. Sadler, the celebrated aeronaut, ascended on one occasion in a balloon from Dublin, and was wafted across the Irish Channel, when, on his approach to the Welsh coast, the balloon descended nearly to the surface of the sea. By this time the sun was set, and the shades of evening began to close in. He threw out nearly all his ballast, and suddenly sprang upwards to a great height, and by so doing brought his horizon to dip below the sun, producing the whole phenomenon of a western sunrise. Subsequently descending in Wales, he of course witnessed a second sunset on the same evening.
This describes how a rapidly ascending balloonist can see more of a setting sun, from the top down, as the viewer gradually rises more and thus sees further, beyond the curvature of the earth. The sun gradually appears as if at sunrise. It is the reverse of the view of a ship sailing toward the horizon which disappears from its hull up to the tip of the mast. In Outlines of Astronomy (1849), 20. A similar description appeared earlier, in Astronomy (1833), 36, which also footnoted Herschel's comment that he had this anecdote from Dr. Lardner, who was present at the ascent
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (47)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Ballast (2)  |  Balloon (14)  |  Curiosity (105)  |  Descent (15)  |  Dip (3)  |  Dublin (3)  |  Evening (12)  |  Height (32)  |  History (366)  |  Horizon (27)  |  Illustration (28)  |  Ireland (8)  |  Phenomenon (274)  |  Principle (279)  |  Sea (186)  |  Sun (276)  |  Sunset (22)

The Sun truly “comes up like thunder,” and it sets just as fast. Each sunrise and sunset lasts only a few seconds. But in that time you see at least eight different bands of color come and go, from a brilliant red to the brightest and deepest blue. And you see sixteen sunrises and sixteen sunsets every day you’re in space. No sunrise or sunset is ever the same.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Band (8)  |  Blue (56)  |  Bright (42)  |  Brilliant (28)  |  Color (98)  |  Deep (119)  |  Different (176)  |  Fast (41)  |  Least (72)  |  Red (35)  |  Same (154)  |  Second (57)  |  See (368)  |  Set (97)  |  Space (256)  |  Sun (276)  |  Sunset (22)  |  Thunder (14)  |  Time (586)  |  Truly (32)

The world has different owners at sunrise… Even your own garden does not belong to you. Rabbits and blackbirds have the lawns; a tortoise-shell cat who never appears in daytime patrols the brick walls, and a golden-tailed pheasant glints his way through the iris spears.
In Listen! The Wind (1938), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (113)  |  Belong (53)  |  Blackbird (4)  |  Brick Wall (2)  |  Cat (36)  |  Daytime (2)  |  Different (176)  |  Garden (33)  |  Glint (2)  |  Lawn (5)  |  Owner (5)  |  Rabbit (8)  |  Spear (6)  |  World (877)

We entered into shadow. Contact with Moscow was gone. Japan floated by beneath us and I could clearly see its cities ablaze with lights. We left Japan behind to face the dark emptiness of the Pacific Ocean. No moon. Only stars, bright and far away. I gripped the handle like a man hanging onto a streetcar. Very slowly, agonizingly, half an hour passed, and with that, dawn on Earth. First, a slim greenish-blue line on the farthest horizon turning within a couple of minutes into a rainbow that hugged the Earth and in turn exploded into a golden sun. You’re out of your mind, I told myself, hanging onto a ship in space, and to your life, and getting ready to admire a sunrise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (17)  |  Behind (38)  |  Beneath (16)  |  Bright (42)  |  City (47)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Contact (33)  |  Couple (9)  |  Dark (75)  |  Dawn (16)  |  Earth (632)  |  Emptiness (10)  |  Enter (29)  |  Explode (7)  |  Face (108)  |  Far (154)  |  First (306)  |  Float (21)  |  Golden (14)  |  Grip (9)  |  Half (55)  |  Handle (15)  |  Hang (24)  |  Horizon (27)  |  Hour (70)  |  Japan (8)  |  Leave (126)  |  Life (1113)  |  Light (345)  |  Line (88)  |  Mind (733)  |  Minute (42)  |  Moon (199)  |  Moscow (4)  |  Myself (36)  |  Pacific Ocean (4)  |  Pass (90)  |  Rainbow (10)  |  Ready (37)  |  See (368)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Ship (44)  |  Slim (2)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Space (256)  |  Star (335)  |  Streetcar (2)  |  Sun (276)  |  Tell (108)  |  Turn (118)

When the morning breezes blow toward the town at sunrise, if they bring with them mists from marshes and, mingled with the mist, the poisonous breath of the creatures of the marshes to be wafted into the bodies of the inhabitants, they will make the site unhealthy.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 4, Sec. 1. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Blow (22)  |  Body (240)  |  Breath (32)  |  Breeze (6)  |  Creature (153)  |  Disease (275)  |  Inhabitant (28)  |  Malaria (10)  |  Marsh (5)  |  Mingle (7)  |  Mist (9)  |  Morning (43)  |  Poisonous (3)  |  Site (12)  |  Town (24)  |  Unhealthy (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.