Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index V > Category: Verdict

Verdict Quotes (8 quotes)

I have never done anything 'useful'. No discovery of mine has made, or is likely to make, directly or indirectly, for good or ill, the least difference to the amenity of the world... Judged by all practical standards, the value of my mathematical life is nil; and outside mathematics it is trivial anyhow. I have just one chance of escaping a verdict of complete triviality, that I may be judged to have created something worth creating. And that I have created something is undeniable: the question is about its value.
A Mathematician's Apology (1940), 90-1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complete (204)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discovery (786)  |  Good (889)  |  Life (1801)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Mine (77)  |  Never (1087)  |  Outside (141)  |  Practical (200)  |  Question (622)  |  Something (719)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (87)  |  Value (368)  |  World (1778)  |  Worth (169)

I have never done anything “useful.” No discovery of mine has made, or is likely to make, directly or indirectly, for good or ill, the least difference to the amenity of the world... Judged by all practical standards, the value of my mathematical life is nil; and outside mathematics it is trivial anyhow. I have just one chance of escaping a verdict of complete triviality, that I may be judged to have created something worth creating. And that I have created something is undeniable: the question is about its value. [The things I have added to knowledge do not differ from] the creations of the other artists, great or small, who have left some kind of memorial beind them.
Concluding remarks in A Mathmatician's Apology (1940, 2012), 150-151.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Artist (90)  |  Biography (242)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complete (204)  |  Creation (329)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discovery (786)  |  Do (1908)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1575)  |  History Of Science (64)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1537)  |  Life (1801)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Mine (77)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Practical (200)  |  Question (622)  |  Small (479)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Useful (250)  |  Value (368)  |  World (1778)  |  Worth (169)

I stand almost with the others. They believe the world was made for man, I believe it likely that it was made for man; they think there is proof, astronomical mainly, that it was made for man, I think there is evidence only, not proof, that it was made for him. It is too early, yet, to arrange the verdict, the returns are not all in. When they are all in, I think that they will show that the world was made for man; but we must not hurry, we must patiently wait till they are all in.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Astronomy (231)  |  Belief (579)  |  Early (186)  |  Evidence (249)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Likely (34)  |  Made (14)  |  Mainly (9)  |  Man (2249)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patiently (3)  |  Proof (290)  |  Return (125)  |  Show (346)  |  Stand (274)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wait (58)  |  Will (2354)  |  World (1778)

In science, address the few; in literature, the many. In science, the few must dictate opinion to the many; in literature, the many, sooner or later, force their judgement on the few. But the few and the many are not necessarily the few and the many of the passing time: for discoverers in science have not un-often, in their own day, had the few against them; and writers the most permanently popular not unfrequently found, in their own day, a frigid reception from the many. By the few, I mean those who must ever remain the few, from whose dieta we, the multitude, take fame upon trust; by the many, I mean those who constitute the multitude in the long-run. We take the fame of a Harvey or a Newton upon trust, from the verdict of the few in successive generations; but the few could never persuade us to take poets and novelists on trust. We, the many, judge for ourselves of Shakespeare and Cervantes.
Caxtoniana: A Series of Essays on Life, Literature, and Manners (1863), Vol. 2, 329- 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Fame (50)  |  Force (488)  |  Generation (242)  |  William Harvey (29)  |  Judge (108)  |  Literature (105)  |  Long (789)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1729)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (335)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Passing (76)  |  Poet (86)  |  Reception (15)  |  Remain (349)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3880)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Successive (73)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trust (67)  |  Writer (86)

Nobody supposes that doctors are less virtuous than judges; but a judge whose salary and reputation depended on whether the verdict was for plaintiff or defendant, prosecutor or prisoner, would be as little trusted as a general in the pay of the enemy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Defendant (2)  |  Depend (228)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Enemy (82)  |  General (511)  |  Judge (108)  |  Less (103)  |  Little (708)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Pay (43)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Salary (7)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Trust (67)  |  Virtuous (9)

Scientific truth, like puristic truth, must come about by controversy. Personally this view is abhorrent to me. It seems to mean that scientific truth must transcend the individual, that the best hope of science lies in its greatest minds being often brilliantly and determinedly wrong, but in opposition, with some third, eclectically minded, middle-of-the-road nonentity seizing the prize while the great fight for it, running off with it, and sticking it into a textbook for sophomores written from no point of view and in defense of nothing whatsoever. I hate this view, for it is not dramatic and it is not fair; and yet I believe that it is the verdict of the history of science.
From Address of the President before the American Psychological Association at New York (28 Dec 1928) 'The Psychology of Controversy', Psychological Review (1929), 36, 97. Collected in Robert I. Watson and Donald T. Campbell (eds.), History, Psychology and Science: Selected Papers by Edwin Boring (1963), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Book (394)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Defense (24)  |  Dramatic (17)  |  Great (1575)  |  Greatest (329)  |  Hate (65)  |  History (675)  |  History Of Science (64)  |  Hope (299)  |  Individual (404)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mean (809)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nonentity (2)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (82)  |  Running (61)  |  Science (3880)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Truth (1062)  |  View (488)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Wrong (234)

Some recent philosophers seem to have given their moral approval to these deplorable verdicts that affirm that the intelligence of an individual is a fixed quantity, a quantity that cannot be augmented. We must protest and react against this brutal pessimism; we will try to demonstrate that it is founded on nothing.
Les idées modernes sur les enfants (1909), 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Augment (12)  |  Demonstrate (77)  |  Deplorable (4)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intelligence (213)  |  Moral (195)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Pessimism (4)  |  Philosopher (259)  |  Protest (9)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Recent (77)  |  Try (283)  |  Will (2354)

Tobacco has not yet been fully tried before the bar of science. But the tribunal has been prepared and the gathering of evidence has begun and when the final verdict is rendered, it will appear that tobacco is evil and only evil; that as a drug it is far more deadly than alcohol, killing in a dose a thousand times smaller, and that it does not possess a single one of the quasi merits of alcohol.
In Tobaccoism: or, How Tobacco Kills (1922), Preface, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Alcohol (22)  |  Deadliness (2)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Dose (16)  |  Drug (57)  |  Evidence (249)  |  Evil (116)  |  Final (119)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Killing (14)  |  Merit (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Possess (156)  |  Render (93)  |  Science (3880)  |  Single (354)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  Tribunal (2)  |  Will (2354)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.