Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Dictionary of Science Quotations > Scientist Names Index H > Thomas Henry Huxley Quotes > Knowledge

Thumbnail of Thomas Henry Huxley (source)
Thomas Henry Huxley
(4 May 1825 - 29 Jun 1895)

English biologist known as the main advocate for Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution.


Thomas Henry Huxley Quotes on Knowledge (14 quotes)

>> Click for 114 Science Quotes by Thomas Henry Huxley

>> Click for Thomas Henry Huxley Quotes on | Ape | Darwin_Charles | Error | Evolution | Fact | Law | Life | Nature | Origin Of Species | Phenomenon | Science | Science And Religion | Truth |

All knowledge is good. It is impossible to say any fragment of knowledge, however insignificant or remote from one’s ordinary pursuits, may not some day be turned to account.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
'Address on University Education' (12 Sep 1876) delivered at the formal opening of the Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore. Collected in Science and Education: Essays (1897), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4107)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Good (889)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Impossible (253)  |  Insignificance (10)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Remote (83)  |  Remoteness (9)  |  Say (984)  |  Turn (447)

Any one who has studied the history of science knows that almost every great step therein has been made by the “anticipation of Nature,” that is, by the invention of hypotheses, which, though verifiable, often had very little foundation to start with; and, not unfrequently, in spite of a long career of usefulness, turned out to be wholly erroneous in the long run.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
In 'The Progress of Science 1837-1887' (1887), Collected Essays (1901), Vol. 1, 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Career (76)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Foundation (173)  |  Great (1575)  |  History (675)  |  History Of Science (64)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Invention (377)  |  Know (1519)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Little (708)  |  Long (789)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Progress (468)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3880)  |  Spite (55)  |  Start (221)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (656)  |  Turn (447)  |  Usefulness (87)  |  Verification (31)  |  Wholly (88)

I really see no harm which can come of giving our children a little knowledge of physiology. ... The instruction must be real, based upon observation, eked out by good explanatory diagrams and models, and conveyed by a teacher whose own knowledge has been acquired by a study of the facts; and not the mere catechismal parrot-work which too often usurps the place of elementary teaching.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
Science and Culture (1882), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Catechism (2)  |  Child (309)  |  Children (200)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Education (379)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Good (889)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Little (708)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (560)  |  Physiology (95)  |  See (1082)  |  Study (656)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Work (1351)

I venture to maintain, that, if the general culture obtained in the Faculty of Arts were what it ought to be, the student would have quite as much knowledge of the fundamental principles of Physics, of Chemistry, and of Biology, as he needs, before he commenced his special medical studies. Moreover, I would urge, that a thorough study of Human Physiology is, in itself, an education broader and more comprehensive than much that passes under that name. There is no side of the intellect which it does not call into play, no region of human knowledge into which either its roots, or its branches, do not extend; like the Atlantic between the Old and the New Worlds, its waves wash the shores of the two worlds of matter and of mind; its tributary streams flow from both; through its waters, as yet unfurrowed by the keel of any Columbus, lies the road, if such there be, from the one to the other; far away from that Northwest Passage of mere speculation, in which so many brave souls have been hopelessly frozen up.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
'Universities: Actual and Ideal' (1874). In Collected Essays (1893), Vol. 3, 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Biology (216)  |  Both (494)  |  Brave (12)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemistry (355)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (379)  |  Extend (128)  |  Flow (84)  |  Fundamental (251)  |  General (511)  |  Human (1470)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Lie (364)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Matter (801)  |  Mind (1339)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1217)  |  Northwest Passage (2)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Old (480)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Physic (516)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Principle (510)  |  Root (120)  |  Side (232)  |  Soul (227)  |  Special (184)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Stream (81)  |  Student (301)  |  Study (656)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Through (849)  |  Tributary (3)  |  Two (937)  |  Wash (21)  |  Water (482)  |  Wave (107)  |  World (1778)

If one of these people, in whom the chance-worship of our remoter ancestors thus strangely survives, should be within reach of the sea when a heavy gale is blowing, let him betake himself to the shore and watch the scene. Let him note the infinite variety of form and size of the tossing waves out at sea; or against the curves of their foam-crested breakers, as they dash against the rocks; let him listen to the roar and scream of the shingle as it is cast up and torn down the beach; or look at the flakes of foam as they drive hither and thither before the wind: or note the play of colours, which answers a gleam of sunshine as it falls upon their myriad bubbles. Surely here, if anywhere, he will say that chance is supreme, and bend the knee as one who has entered the very penetralia of his divinity. But the man of science knows that here, as everywhere, perfect order is manifested; that there is not a curve of the waves, not a note in the howling chorus, not a rainbow-glint on a bubble, which is other than a necessary consequence of the ascertained laws of nature; and that with a sufficient knowledge of the conditions, competent physico-mathematical skill could account for, and indeed predict, every one of these 'chance' events.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
In 'On the Reception of the Origin of Species'. In Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Including an Autobiographical Chapter (1888), Vol. 2, 200-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Against (332)  |  Ancestor (61)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Beach (21)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Cast (67)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chorus (6)  |  Condition (357)  |  Consequence (207)  |  Curve (49)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Down (455)  |  Enter (142)  |  Event (216)  |  Everywhere (95)  |  Fall (230)  |  Form (960)  |  Himself (461)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Infinite (233)  |  Know (1519)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Law (895)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2249)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Predict (80)  |  Rainbow (17)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rock (161)  |  Say (984)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3880)  |  Sea (309)  |  Skill (109)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Surely (101)  |  Survive (79)  |  Torn (17)  |  Variety (133)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2354)  |  Wind (128)  |  Worship (32)

In its earliest development knowledge is self-sown. Impressions force themselves upon men’s senses whether they will or not, and often against their will. The amount of interest in which these impressions awaken is determined by the coarser pains and pleasures which they carry in their train or by mere curiosity; and reason deals with the materials supplied to it as far as that interest carries it, and no further. Such common knowledge is rather brought than sought; and such ratiocination is little more than the working of a blind intellectual instinct. It is only when the mind passes beyond this condition that it begins to evolve science. When simple curiosity passes into the love of knowledge as such, and the gratification of the æsthetic sense of the beauty of completeness and accuracy seems more desirable that the easy indolence of ignorance; when the finding out of the causes of things becomes a source of joy, and he is accounted happy who is successful in the search, common knowledge passes into what our forefathers called natural history, whence there is but a step to that which used to be termed natural philosophy, and now passes by the name of physical science.
In this final state of knowledge the phenomena of nature are regarded as one continuous series of causes and effects; and the ultimate object of science is to trace out that series, from the term which is nearest to us, to that which is at the farthest limit accessible to our means of investigation.
The course of nature as it is, as it has been, and as it will be, is the object of scientific inquiry; whatever lies beyond, above, or below this is outside science. But the philosopher need not despair at the limitation on his field of labor; in relation to the human mind Nature is boundless; and, though nowhere inaccessible, she is everywhere unfathomable.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoölogy (1880), 2-3. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789-790.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  Account (192)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Against (332)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beauty (300)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cause (542)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Common (436)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Condition (357)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Course (408)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deal (188)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Despair (40)  |  Determination (78)  |  Development (424)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (394)  |  Everywhere (95)  |  Evolution (593)  |  Field (365)  |  Final (119)  |  Finding (30)  |  Force (488)  |  Forefather (4)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happiness (116)  |  Happy (105)  |  History (675)  |  Human (1470)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Inquiry (79)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (231)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (281)  |  Limitation (48)  |  Little (708)  |  Love (309)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (580)  |  Mind (1339)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pain (136)  |  Phenomenon (319)  |  Philosopher (259)  |  Philosophy (382)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pleasure (179)  |  Ratiocination (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (304)  |  Science (3880)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Successful (123)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (104)  |  Tracing (3)  |  Train (114)  |  Ultimate (146)  |  Unfathomable (10)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2354)

In science, as in life, learning and knowledge are distinct, and the study of things, and not of books, is the source of the latter.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
In 'On The Study of Zoology', Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (394)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Learn (632)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1799)  |  Science (3880)  |  Science And Education (16)  |  Study (656)  |  Thing (1915)

Suppose it were perfectly certain that the life and fortune of every one of us would, one day or other, depend upon his winning or losing a game of chess. Don't you think that we should all consider it to be a primary duty to learn at least the names and the moves of the pieces; to have a notion of a gambit, and a keen eye for all the means of giving and getting out of check? Do you not think that we should look with a disapprobation amounting to scorn upon the father who allowed his son, or the state which allowed its members, to grow up without knowing a pawn from a knight?
Yet, it is a very plain and elementary truth that the life, the fortune, and the happiness of every one of us, and, more or less, of those who are connected with us, do depend upon our knowing something of the rules of a game infinitely more difficult and complicated than chess. It is a game which has been played for untold ages, every man and woman of us being one of the two players in a game of his or her own. The chess-board is the world, the pieces are the phenomena of the universe, the rules of the game are what we call the laws of nature. The player on the other side is hidden from us. We know that his play is always fair, just, and patient. But also we know, to our cost, that he never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance. To the man who plays well the highest stakes are paid with that sort of overflowing generosity with which the strong shows delight in strength. And one who plays ill is checkmated—without haste, but without remorse.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
Address to the South London Working Men’s College. 'A Liberal Education; and Where to Find It', in David Masson, (ed.), Macmillan’s Magazine (Mar 1868), 17, 369. Also in 'A Liberal Education and Where to Find it' (1868). In Collected Essays (1893), Vol. 3, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4107)  |  Allowance (6)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Check (24)  |  Checkmate (2)  |  Chess (25)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consider (416)  |  Cost (87)  |  Delight (109)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Difficult (247)  |  Difficulty (198)  |  Disapprobation (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Eye (423)  |  Father (110)  |  Fortune (50)  |  Game (101)  |  Generosity (7)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happiness (116)  |  Haste (6)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ill (12)  |  Infinity (91)  |  Knight (6)  |  Know (1519)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Law (895)  |  Learn (632)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1799)  |  Look (582)  |  Loss (110)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mankind (340)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (580)  |  Member (41)  |  Mistake (170)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Move (216)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Patient (199)  |  Pawn (2)  |  Payment (6)  |  Phenomenon (319)  |  Player (8)  |  Primary (80)  |  Remorse (9)  |  Rule (295)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (232)  |  Something (719)  |  Son (24)  |  Stake (19)  |  State (491)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (861)  |  Win (52)  |  Winning (19)  |  Woman (152)  |  World (1778)

The child asks, “What is the moon, and why does it shine?” “What is this water and where does it run?” “What is this wind?” “What makes the waves of the sea?” “Where does this animal live, and what is the use of this plant?” And if not snubbed and stunted by being told not to ask foolish questions, there is no limit to the intellectual craving of a young child; nor any bounds to the slow, but solid, accretion of knowledge and development of the thinking faculty in this way. To all such questions, answers which are necessarily incomplete, though true as far as they go, may be given by any teacher whose ideas represent real knowledge and not mere book learning; and a panoramic view of Nature, accompanied by a strong infusion of the scientific habit of mind, may thus be placed within the reach of every child of nine or ten.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
In 'Scientific Education', Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 71. https://books.google.com/books?id=13cJAAAAIAAJ Thomas Henry Huxley - 1870
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Accretion (5)  |  All (4107)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (394)  |  Bound (119)  |  Child (309)  |  Crave (9)  |  Development (424)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Habit (168)  |  Idea (845)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Infusion (4)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Learning (274)  |  Limit (281)  |  Live (629)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Moon (238)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Plant (295)  |  Question (622)  |  Reach (281)  |  Real (149)  |  Represent (154)  |  Run (174)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Sea (309)  |  Shine (46)  |  Slow (101)  |  Snub (2)  |  Solid (116)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thinking (415)  |  True (214)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Water (482)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1216)  |  Why (491)  |  Wind (128)  |  Young (228)

The great end of life is not knowledge, but action. What men need is as much knowledge as they can organize for action; give them more and it may become injurious. Some men are heavy and stupid from undigested learning.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
'Technical Education' (1877). In Collected Essays (1893), Vol. 3, 422. [A similar statement was made in the same time period by Karl Marx.]
Science quotes on:  |  Action (328)  |  Become (815)  |  End (590)  |  Great (1575)  |  Injurious (14)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1799)  |  More (2559)  |  Organize (29)  |  Stupid (36)

The improver of natural knowledge absolutely refuses to acknowledge authority as such. For him, scepticism is the highest of duties, blind faith the one unpardonable sin. The man of science has learned to believe in justification, not by faith, but by verification.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
In Lecture (7 Jan 1866), a Lay Sermon delivered at St. Martin’s Hall, 'Advisableness of Improving Natural Knowledge', Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1872), 18. Previously published in Fortnightly Review.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (146)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Authority (96)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blind (95)  |  Duty (68)  |  Faith (203)  |  Improve (58)  |  Justification (49)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Learn (632)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2249)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3880)  |  Sin (42)  |  Verification (31)

The known is finite, the unknown infinite; intellectually we stand on an islet in the midst of an illimitable ocean of inexplicability. Our business in every generation is to reclaim a little more land, to add something to the extent and the solidity of our possessions. And even a cursory glance at the history of the biological sciences during the last quarter of a century is sufficient to justify the assertion, that the most potent instrument for the extension of the realm of natural knowledge which has come into men's hands, since the publication of Newton's ‘Principia’, is Darwin's ‘Origin of Species.’
— Thomas Henry Huxley
From concluding remarks to a chapter by Thomas Huxley, 'On the Reception of the ‘Origin of Species’', the last chapter in Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887), Vol. 1, 557.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Business (149)  |  Century (310)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extent (139)  |  Finite (60)  |  Generation (242)  |  Glance (34)  |  History (675)  |  Infinite (233)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (708)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1729)  |  Natural (796)  |  Ocean (203)  |  Origin (241)  |  Possession (65)  |  Potent (12)  |  Principia (13)  |  Publication (102)  |  Realm (85)  |  Science (3880)  |  Something (719)  |  Species (402)  |  Stand (274)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Understanding (514)  |  Unknown (182)

The saying that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing is, to my mind, a very dangerous adage. If knowledge is real and genuine, I do not believe that it is other than a very valuable posession, however infinitesimal its quantity may be. Indeed, if a little knowledge is dangerous, where is a man who has so much as to be out of danger?
— Thomas Henry Huxley
'Instruction in Physiology', in Science and Culture and Other Essays (1882), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Adage (4)  |  Danger (116)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Do (1908)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Infinitesimal (30)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Little (708)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possession (65)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Real (149)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Value (368)

Very few, even among those who have taken the keenest interest in the progress of the revolution in natural knowledge set afoot by the publication of the “Origin of Species”; and who have watched, not without astonishment, the rapid and complete change which has been effected both inside and outside the boundaries of the scientific world in the attitude of men’s minds towards the doctrines which are expounded in that great work, can have been prepared for the extraordinary manifestation of affectionate regard for the man, and of profound reverence for the philosopher, which followed the announcement, on Thursday last, of the death of Mr Darwin.
— Thomas Henry Huxley
'Obituary [of Charles Darwin]' (1882). In Collected Essays (1893), Vol. 2, 244.
Science quotes on:  |  Announcement (15)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Both (494)  |  Change (595)  |  Complete (204)  |  Charles Darwin (304)  |  Death (391)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Effect (394)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Follow (379)  |  Great (1575)  |  Interest (386)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2249)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Natural (796)  |  Obituary (10)  |  Origin (241)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Outside (141)  |  Philosopher (259)  |  Profound (104)  |  Progress (468)  |  Publication (102)  |  Regard (304)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Set (394)  |  Species (402)  |  Watch (109)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1778)


See also:
  • 4 May - short biography, births, deaths and events on date of Huxley's birth.
  • Thomas Henry Huxley - Autobiography
  • Thomas Henry Huxley - context of quote “Investigation of nature is an infinite pasture-ground ” - Medium image (500 x 250 px)
  • Thomas Henry Huxley - context of quote “Investigation of nature is an infinite pasture-ground ” - Large image (800 x 400 px)
  • Thomas Henry Huxley: The Evolution of a Scientist, by Sherrie L. Lyons. - book suggestion.
  • Booklist for Thomas Huxley.

Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.