Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Ideal

Ideal Quotes (26 quotes)

All our scientific and philosophic ideals are altars to unknown gods.
'The Dilemma of Determinism' (1884). In The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy (1897), 147.

An intimate friend and a hated enemy have always been indispensable requirements for my emotional life; I have always been able to create them anew, and not infrequently my childish ideal has been so closely approached that friend and enemy coincided in the same person.
The Interpretation of Dreams (1913), 385. Sigmund Freud - 1913
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (16)  |  Childish (3)  |  Coincidence (6)  |  Create (15)  |  Emotion (27)  |  Enemy (24)  |  Friend (21)  |  Hatred (7)  |  Indispensable (2)  |  Infrequently (2)  |  Intimate (4)  |  Life (439)  |  Person (32)  |  Requirement (26)

Common sense is science exactly in so far as it fulfills the ideal of common sense; that is, sees facts as they are, or at any rate, without the distortion of prejudice, and reasons from them in accordance with the dictates of sound judgment. And science is simply common sense at its best, that is, rigidly accurate in observation, and merciless to fallacy in logic.
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoφlogy (1880), 2. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789.
Science quotes on:  |  Accordance (4)  |  Accuracy (33)  |  Best (40)  |  Common Sense (34)  |  Dictate (2)  |  Distortion (4)  |  Fact (311)  |  Fallacy (9)  |  Fulfillment (6)  |  Judgment (38)  |  Logic (131)  |  Observation (256)  |  Prejudice (29)  |  Reason (172)  |  Rigidity (3)  |  Science (850)

Evolution ever climbing after some ideal good,
And Reversion ever dragging Evolution in the mud.
'Locksley Hall Sixty Years After' (1886), collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic Works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 522.
Science quotes on:  |  Dragging (2)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Good (77)  |  Mud (10)

For myself, I like a universe that, includes much that is unknown and, at the same time, much that is knowable. A universe in which everything is known would be static and dull, as boring as the heaven of some weak-minded theologians. A universe that is unknowable is no fit place for a thinking being. The ideal universe for us is one very much like the universe we inhabit. And I would guess that this is not really much of a coincidence.
'Can We know the Universe?' in M. Gardner (ed.), The Sacred Beetle and Other Great Essays in Science (1985), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (34)  |  Boredom (4)  |  Coincidence (6)  |  Dullness (4)  |  Heaven (53)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Mind (266)  |  Theologian (11)  |  Thinking (163)  |  Universe (274)  |  Unknown (39)  |  Weak (10)

Imaginary numbers are a fine and wonderful refuge of the divine spirit almost an amphibian between being and non-being. (1702)
[Alternate translation:] The Divine Spirit found a sublime outlet in that wonder of analysis, that portent of the ideal world, that amphibian between being and not-being, which we call the imaginary root of negative unity.
Quoted in Fιlix Klein, Elementary Mathematics From an Advanced Standpoint: Arithmetic, Algebra, Analysis (1924), 56. Alternate translation as quoted in Tobias Dantzig, Number, the Language of Science: a Critical Survey Written for the Cultured Non-Mathematician (1930), 204
Science quotes on:  |  Amphibian (4)  |  Analaysis (2)  |  Being (34)  |  Imaginary (5)  |  Imaginary Number (3)  |  Negative (10)  |  Refuge (4)  |  Root (19)  |  Unity (16)  |  Wonderful (9)

In science the new is an advance; but in morals, as contradicting our inner ideals and historic idols, it is ever a retrogression.
Levana, or, The Doctrine of Education translated from the German (1880), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (49)  |  Contradict (2)  |  Idol (2)  |  Moral (38)  |  New (99)  |  Science (850)

My ideal man is Benjamin Franklin—the figure in American history most worthy of emulation ... Franklin is my ideal of a whole man. ... Where are the life-size—or even pint-size—Benjamin Franklins of today?
Describing his personal hero, in a lecture (1964). In Gerald James Holton, Victory and Vexation in Science: Einstein, Bohr, Heisenberg, and Others (2005), 92. In John S. Rigden,Science: The Center of Culture (1970), 111-112. In Rabi, Scientist and Citizen (2000), xxv, the author states that a portrait of Benjamin Franklin hung in Rabi's office.
Science quotes on:  |  Emulate (2)  |  Benjamin Franklin (63)  |  Hero (9)  |  History (151)

Objective evidence and certitude are doubtless very fine ideals to play with, but where on this moonlit and dream-visited planet are they found?
'The Will to Believe' (1896). In The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy (1897), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (59)  |  Evidence (80)

Science has hitherto been proceeding without the guidance of any rational theory of logic, and has certainly made good progress. It is like a computer who is pursuing some method of arithmetical approximation. Even if he occasionally makes mistakes in his ciphering, yet if the process is a good one they will rectify themselves. But then he would approximate much more rapidly if he did not commit these errors; and in my opinion, the time has come when science ought to be provided with a logic. My theory satisfies me; I can see no flaw in it. According to that theory universality, necessity, exactitude, in the absolute sense of these words, are unattainable by us, and do not exist in nature. There is an ideal law to which nature approximates; but to express it would require an endless series of modifications, like the decimals expressing surd. Only when you have asked a question in so crude a shape that continuity is not involved, is a perfectly true answer attainable.
Letter to G. F. Becker, 11 June 1893. Merrill Collection, Library of Congress. Quoted in Nathan Reingold, Science in Nineteenth-Century America: A Documentary History (1966), 231-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (32)  |  Answer (91)  |  Approximation (9)  |  Approximation (9)  |  Arithmetic (33)  |  Attainment (21)  |  Commitment (8)  |  Computer (51)  |  Crudity (2)  |  Decimal (8)  |  Endless (12)  |  Error (150)  |  Exactitude (3)  |  Existence (145)  |  Flaw (5)  |  Good (77)  |  Guidance (7)  |  Guidance (7)  |  Hitherto (2)  |  Logic (131)  |  Method (73)  |  Modification (21)  |  Nature (524)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Opinion (81)  |  Perfection (41)  |  Proceeding (10)  |  Progress (198)  |  Provision (10)  |  Pursuit (33)  |  Question (152)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Rationality (4)  |  Satisfaction (29)  |  Science (850)  |  Sense (100)  |  Series (18)  |  Theory (346)  |  Theory (346)  |  Time (160)  |  Truth (440)  |  Universality (9)  |  Word (96)

Science only means knowledge; and for [Greek] ancients it did only mean knowledge. Thus the favorite science of the Greeks was Astronomy, because it was as abstract as Algebra. ... We may say that the great Greek ideal was to have no use for useful things. The Slave was he who learned useful things; the Freeman was he who learned useless things. This still remains the ideal of many noble men of science, in the sense they do desire truth as the great Greeks desired it; and their attitude is an external protest against vulgarity of utilitarianism.
'About Beliefs', in As I was Saying: A Book of Essays (1936), 65-66. Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (18)  |  Ancient (27)  |  Astronomy (103)  |  Attitude (16)  |  Desire (45)  |  External (18)  |  Favorite (7)  |  Great (58)  |  Greece (4)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Learning (123)  |  Men Of Science (90)  |  Noble (14)  |  Protest (3)  |  Remains (3)  |  Science (850)  |  Sense (100)  |  Slave (9)  |  Thing (27)  |  Truth (440)  |  Usefulness (52)  |  Vulgarity (2)

Science, in its ultimate ideal, consists of a set of propositions arranged in a hierarchy, the lowest level of the hierarchy being concerned with particular facts, and the highest with some general law, governing everything in the universe. The various levels in the hierarchy have a two-fold logical connection, travelling one up, one down; the upward connection proceeds by induction, the downward by deduction.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (26)  |  Connection (39)  |  Consist (8)  |  Deduction (38)  |  Everything (33)  |  Fact (311)  |  General (23)  |  Govern (2)  |  Hierarchy (6)  |  Induction (22)  |  Law (269)  |  Logical (3)  |  Particular (22)  |  Proposition (28)  |  Science (850)  |  Scientific Method (98)  |  Set (12)  |  Ultimate (27)  |  Universe (274)

The Greeks made Space the subject-matter of a science of supreme simplicity and certainty. Out of it grew, in the mind of classical antiquity, the idea of pure science. Geometry became one of the most powerful expressions of that sovereignty of the intellect that inspired the thought of those times. At a later epoch, when the intellectual despotism of the Church, which had been maintained through the Middle Ages, had crumbled, and a wave of scepticism threatened to sweep away all that had seemed most fixed, those who believed in Truth clung to Geometry as to a rock, and it was the highest ideal of every scientist to carry on his science 'more geometrico.'
In Space,Time, Matter, translated by Henry Leopold Brose (1952), 1
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquity (5)  |  Belief (135)  |  Certainty (59)  |  Church (16)  |  Epoch (2)  |  Expression (43)  |  Fixed (6)  |  Geometry (64)  |  Greek (15)  |  Grow (4)  |  Intellect (95)  |  Later (4)  |  Maintain (10)  |  Middle Ages (3)  |  Powerful (12)  |  Pure Science (7)  |  Rock (53)  |  Science (850)  |  Seem (10)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Skepticism (9)  |  Sovereignty (2)  |  Space (64)  |  Subject (48)  |  Supreme (8)  |  Sweep (3)  |  Thinking (163)  |  Truth (440)  |  Wave (32)

The ideal of the supreme being is nothing but a regulative principle of reason which directs us to look upon all connection in the world as if it originated from an all-sufficient necessary cause.
Critique of Pure Reason (1781), trans. Norman Kemp Smith (1929), 517.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (116)  |  Connection (39)  |  God (229)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Reason (172)

The instinct to command others, in its primitive essence, is a carnivorous, altogether bestial and savage instinct. Under the influence of the mental development of man, it takes on a somewhat more ideal form and becomes somewhat ennobled, presenting itself as the instrument of reason and the devoted servant of that abstraction, or political fiction, which is called the public good. But in its essence it remains just as baneful, and it becomes even more so when, with the application of science, it extends its scope and intensifies the power of its action. If there is a devil in history, it is this power principle.
In Mikhail Aleksandrovich Bakunin, Grigorii Petrovich Maksimov, Max Nettlau, The political philosophy of Bakunin (1953), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (10)  |  Action (52)  |  Application (68)  |  Bestial (2)  |  Carnivorous (2)  |  Command (6)  |  Development (117)  |  Devil (9)  |  Devoted (3)  |  Essence (18)  |  Extend (6)  |  Fiction (8)  |  History (151)  |  Influence (46)  |  Instinct (25)  |  Instinct (25)  |  Instrument (37)  |  Mental (14)  |  Political (2)  |  Power (98)  |  Primitive (13)  |  Principle (96)  |  Reason (172)  |  Savage (8)  |  Science (850)  |  Scope (5)  |  Servant (5)

The ordinary patient goes to his doctor because he is in pain or some other discomfort and wants to be comfortable again; he is not in pursuit of the ideal of health in any direct sense. The doctor on the other hand wants to discover the pathological condition and control it if he can. The two are thus to some degree at cross purposes from the first, and unless the affair is brought to an early and happy conclusion this diversion of aims is likely to become more and more serious as the case goes on.
Address, opening of 1932-3 session of U.C.H. Medical School (4 Oct 1932), 'Art and Science in medicine', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (10)  |  Aim (20)  |  Case (15)  |  Comfort (16)  |  Conclusion (73)  |  Condition (66)  |  Control (42)  |  Discover (16)  |  Diversion (5)  |  Doctor (54)  |  Early (8)  |  Happiness (56)  |  Health (92)  |  Other Hand (2)  |  Pain (48)  |  Pathology (9)  |  Patient (52)  |  Pursuit (33)  |  Sense (100)  |  Seriousness (6)  |  Want (28)

The picture of scientific method drafted by modern philosophy is very different from traditional conceptions. Gone is the ideal of a universe whose course follows strict rules, a predetermined cosmos that unwinds itself like an unwinding clock. Gone is the ideal of the scientist who knows the absolute truth. The happenings of nature are like rolling dice rather than like revolving stars; they are controlled by probability laws, not by causality, and the scientist resembles a gambler more than a prophet. He can tell you only his best posits—he never knows beforehand whether they will come true. He is a better gambler, though, than the man at the green table, because his statistical methods are superior. And his goal is staked higher—the goal of foretelling the rolling dice of the cosmos. If he is asked why he follows his methods, with what title he makes his predictions, he cannot answer that he has an irrefutable knowledge of the future; he can only lay his best bets. But he can prove that they are best bets, that making them is the best he can do—and if a man does his best, what else can you ask of him?
The Rise of Scientific Philosophy (1951, 1973), 248-9. Collected in James Louis Jarrett and Sterling M. McMurrin (eds.), Contemporary Philosophy: A Book of Readings (1954), 376.
Science quotes on:  |  Absoluteness (3)  |  Asking (17)  |  Best (40)  |  Bet (4)  |  Causality (4)  |  Clock (13)  |  Conception (28)  |  Cosmos (21)  |  Course (25)  |  Dice (7)  |  Difference (129)  |  Draft (2)  |  Foretelling (3)  |  Future (101)  |  Gambler (3)  |  Goal (32)  |  Happening (20)  |  Irrefutable (3)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Method (73)  |  Modern (42)  |  Nature (524)  |  Philosophy (128)  |  Picture (19)  |  Posit (2)  |  Prediction (45)  |  Probability (54)  |  Proof (133)  |  Prophet (3)  |  Roll (3)  |  Rule (50)  |  Scientific Method (98)  |  Scientist (224)  |  Stake (6)  |  Star (124)  |  Statistics (74)  |  Superiority (6)  |  Tradition (16)  |  Truth (440)  |  Universe (274)

The power that produced Man when the monkey was not up to the mark, can produce a higher creature than Man if Man does not come up to the mark. What it means is that if Man is to be saved, Man must save himself. There seems no compelling reason why he should be saved. He is by no means an ideal creature. At his present best many of his ways are so unpleasant that they are unmentionable in polite society, and so painful that he is compelled to pretend that pain is often a good. Nature holds no brief for the human experiment: it must stand or fall by its results. If Man will not serve, Nature will try another experiment.
Back to Methuselah: a Metabiological Pentateuch (1921), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Another (5)  |  Best (40)  |  Brief (4)  |  Compelling (5)  |  Creature (45)  |  Experiment (367)  |  Fall (30)  |  Good (77)  |  Higher (18)  |  Himself (9)  |  Human (155)  |  Man (258)  |  Mark (13)  |  Monkey (25)  |  Nature (524)  |  Pain (48)  |  Pleasant (6)  |  Polite (3)  |  Power (98)  |  Present (32)  |  Pretend (4)  |  Production (70)  |  Reason (172)  |  Result (127)  |  Save (12)  |  Serve (13)  |  Society (81)  |  Stand (24)

The purpose of science is to develop, without prejudice or preconception of any kind, a knowledge of the facts, the laws, and the processes of nature. The even more important task of religion, on the other hand, is to develop the consciences, the ideals, and the aspirations of mankind.
A statement formulated by Millikan (1923) signed by forty-five leaders of religion, science and human affairs. Reproduced in Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors (May 1923), 9, No. 5, 47. (Note the context in time: the contemporary social climate by 1925 led to the Butler Act banning the teaching of evolution in Tennessee schools and the resulting trial of John Scopes.)
Science quotes on:  |  Aspiration (8)  |  Conscience (16)  |  Development (117)  |  Fact (311)  |  Importance (98)  |  Kind (26)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Law (269)  |  Mankind (105)  |  Nature (524)  |  Preconception (6)  |  Prejudice (29)  |  Process (97)  |  Purpose (62)  |  Religion (116)  |  Science (850)  |  Science And Religion (153)  |  Task (31)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorption (5)  |  Ash (6)  |  Balance (23)  |  Blood (61)  |  Body (88)  |  Bone (25)  |  Brain (105)  |  Break (18)  |  Chemist (47)  |  Composition (29)  |  Condition (66)  |  Constant (14)  |  Constituent (8)  |  Environment (70)  |  Exaggeration (3)  |  Excretion (3)  |  Failure (55)  |  Fire (58)  |  Foreign (8)  |  Gland (7)  |  Immediate (8)  |  Incidental (2)  |  Infinite (37)  |  Innumerable (10)  |  Internal (6)  |  Keep (9)  |  Kidney (7)  |  Loaf (2)  |  Major (6)  |  Manufacturing (14)  |  Master (19)  |  Mouth (10)  |  Muscle (23)  |  Operation (54)  |  Performance (16)  |  Proper (9)  |  Removal (7)  |  Responsibility (23)  |  Reverse (6)  |  Sleep (25)  |  State (42)  |  Substance (37)  |  Survival (30)  |  Synthesis (23)  |  Task (31)  |  Variety (28)  |  Variety (28)

The truth us that other systems of geometry are possible, yet after all, these other systems are not spaces but other methods of space measurements. There is one space only, though we may conceive of many different manifolds, which are contrivances or ideal constructions invented for the purpose of determining space.
In Science (1903), 18, 106. In Robert Γ‰douard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica (1914), 352.
Science quotes on:  |  Construction (34)  |  Contrivance (6)  |  Determine (15)  |  Different (15)  |  Geometry (64)  |  Invention (167)  |  Manifold (4)  |  Measurement (108)  |  Possibility (67)  |  Purpose (62)  |  Space (64)  |  System (67)  |  Truth (440)

There are those who say that the human kidney was created to keep the blood pure, or more precisely, to keep our internal environment in an ideal balanced state. This I must deny. I grant that the human kidney is a marvelous organ, but I cannot grant that it was purposefully designed to excrete urine or to regulate the composition of the blood or to subserve the physiological welfare of Homo sapiens in any sense. Rather I contend that the human kidney manufactures the kind of urine that it does, and it maintains the blood in the composition which that fluid has, because this kidney has a certain functional architecture; and it owes that architecture not to design or foresight or to any plan, but to the fact that the earth is an unstable sphere with a fragile crust, to the geologic revolutions that for six hundred million years have raised and lowered continents and seas, to the predacious enemies, and heat and cold, and storms and droughts; to the unending succession of vicissitudes that have driven the mutant vertebrates from sea into fresh water, into desiccated swamps, out upon the dry land, from one habitation to another, perpetually in search of the free and independent life, perpetually failing, for one reason or another, to find it.
From Fish to Philosopher (1953), 210-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (21)  |  Balance (23)  |  Blood (61)  |  Cold (22)  |  Composition (29)  |  Contention (7)  |  Continent (22)  |  Creation (124)  |  Crust (9)  |  Denial (3)  |  Design (36)  |  Design (36)  |  Drought (6)  |  Dry (8)  |  Earth (238)  |  Enemy (24)  |  Environment (70)  |  Excretion (3)  |  Fact (311)  |  Failure (55)  |  Fluid (6)  |  Foresight (3)  |  Free (11)  |  Fresh (8)  |  Function (41)  |  Geology (144)  |  Grant (8)  |  Grant (8)  |  Heat (48)  |  Homo Sapiens (11)  |  Human (155)  |  Independent (15)  |  Internal (6)  |  Keep (9)  |  Kidney (7)  |  Land (25)  |  Life (439)  |  Lowering (2)  |  Maintenance (7)  |  Manufacturing (14)  |  Marvel (16)  |  Organ (39)  |  Perpetual (3)  |  Physiology (40)  |  Plan (39)  |  Predator (3)  |  Purity (8)  |  Purpose (62)  |  Raise (6)  |  Reason (172)  |  Regulation (13)  |  Revolution (33)  |  French Saying (51)  |  Sea (56)  |  Search (37)  |  Sense (100)  |  Serve (13)  |  Sphere (12)  |  State (42)  |  Storm (13)  |  Succession (29)  |  Swamp (2)  |  Unstable (4)  |  Vertebrate (11)  |  Vicissitude (3)  |  Water (116)  |  Welfare (9)

There is a demon in technology. It was put there by man and man will have to exorcise it before technological civilization can achieve the eighteenth-century ideal of humane civilized life.
A God Within (1972), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (5)  |  Civilization (84)  |  Demon (2)  |  Man (258)  |  Technology (95)

To mix science up with philosophy is only to produce a philosophy that has lost all its ideal value and a science that has lost all its practical value. It is for my private physician to tell me whether this or that food will kill me. It is for my private philosopher to tell me whether I ought to be killed.
In All Things Considered (1908), 187.
Science quotes on:  |   (23)  |  Death (175)  |  Food (73)  |  Philosopher (65)  |  Physician (171)  |  Practical (30)  |  Private (6)  |  Science (850)  |  Value (63)

We cannot idealize technology. Technology is only and always the reflection of our own imagination, and its uses must be conditioned by our own values. Technology can help cure diseases, but we can prevent a lot of diseases by old-fashioned changes in behavior.
Remarks at Knoxville Auditorium Coliseum, Knoxville, Tennessee (10 Oct 1996) while seeking re-election. American Presidency Project web page.
Science quotes on:  |  Behaviour (22)  |  Change (129)  |  Condition (66)  |  Cure (48)  |  Disease (169)  |  Imagination (125)  |  Old-Fashioned (3)  |  Prevent (5)  |  Reflection (26)  |  Technology (95)  |  Value (63)

What is peculiar and new to the [19th] century, differentiating it from all its predecessors, is its technology. It was not merely the introduction of some great isolated inventions. It is impossible not to feel that something more than that was involved. ... The process of change was slow, unconscious, and unexpected. In the nineteeth century, the process became quick, conscious, and expected. ... The whole change has arisen from the new scientific information. Science, conceived not so much in its principles as in its results, is an obvious storehouse of ideas for utilisation. ... Also, it is a great mistake to think that the bare scientific idea is the required invention, so that it has only to be picked up and used. An intense period of imaginative design lies between. One element in the new method is just the discovery of how to set about bridging the gap between the scientific ideas, and the ultimate product. It is a process of disciplined attack upon one difficulty after another This discipline of knowledge applies beyond technology to pure science, and beyond science to general scholarship. It represents the change from amateurs to professionals. ... But the full self-conscious realisation of the power of professionalism in knowledge in all its departments, and of the way to produce the professionals, and of the importance of knowledge to the advance of technology, and of the methods by which abstract knowledge can be connected with technology, and of the boundless possibilities of technological advance,—the realisation of all these things was first completely attained in the nineteeth century.
In Science and the Modern World (1925, 1997), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (7)  |  Amateur (7)  |  Boundless (6)  |  Change (129)  |  Conscious (5)  |  Design (36)  |  Differentiate (3)  |  Expected (2)  |  Imagination (125)  |  Information (51)  |  Invention (167)  |  Isolated (5)  |  Peculiar (10)  |  Predecessor (13)  |  Professional (9)  |  Realisation (2)  |  Scholarship (5)  |  Storehouse (2)  |  Unconscious (7)  |  Unexpected (13)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

New Book


The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets,
by Simon Singh

Cleverly embedded in many Simpsons plots are subtle references to mathematics, because the show's brilliant comedy writers with advanced degrees in math or science. Singh offers an entirely new insight into the most successful show in television history.