Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Simplicity

Simplicity Quotes (92 quotes)

An diesen Apparate ist nichts neu als seine Einfachkeit und die vollkommene zu Verlaessigkeit, welche er gewaehst.
In this apparatus is nothing new but its simplicity and thorough trustworthiness.
On his revolutionary method of organic analysis.
Poggendorf's Annalen, (1831), 21, 4. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (82)  |  Apparatus (18)  |  Organic Chemistry (27)  |  Reliability (9)

Dilbert: Maybe I'm unlucky in love because I'm so knowledgeable about science that I intimidate people. Their intimidation becomes low self-esteem, then they reject me to protect their egos.
Dogbert: Occam's Razor.
Dilbert: What is "Occam's Razor"?
Dogbert: A guy named Occam had a rule about the world. Basically he said that when there are multiple explanations for something the simplest explanation is usually correct. The simplest explanation for your poor love life is that you're immensely unattractive.
Dilbert: Maybe Occam had another rule that specifically exempted this situation, but his house burned down with all his notes. Then he forgot.
Dogbert: Occam's Razor.
Dilbert: I'm an idiot.
Dogbert: I don't think we can rule it out at this point.
Dilbert comic strip (11 Jul 1993).
Science quotes on:  |  Correct (14)  |  Ego (5)  |  Exemption (2)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Forgetfulness (4)  |  Idiot (10)  |  Intimidation (2)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Love (64)  |  Luck (22)  |  Multiple (6)  |  Note (10)  |  Occam's Razor (2)  |  Protection (13)  |  Rejection (16)  |  Rule (52)  |  Science (875)  |  Situation (21)

Il faut bien s'arrêter quelque part, et pour que la science soit possible, il faut s'arrêter quand on a trouvé la simplicité.
Analyse data just so far as to obtain simplicity and no further.
La Science et L'Hypothèse (1902), 176. Sentence translated in A.D. Ritchie, Scientific Method: An Inquiry into the Character and Validy of Natural Law (1923), 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Data (59)

Newsreader: A huge asteroid could destroy Earth! And by coincidence, that's the subject of tonight's miniseries.
Dogbert: In science, researchers proved that this simple device can keep idiots off your television screen. [TV remote control] Click.
Dilbert cartoon strip (30 Apr 1993).
Science quotes on:  |  Asteroid (5)  |  Click (3)  |  Coincidence (6)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Device (15)  |  Earth (250)  |  Idiot (10)  |  News (6)  |  Proof (136)  |  Researcher (9)  |  Science (875)  |  Screen (5)  |  Subject (51)  |  Television (8)

A fact is a simple statement that everyone believes. It is innocent, unless found guilty. A hypothesis is a novel suggestion that no one wants to believe. It is guilty until found effective.
Edward Teller, Wendy Teller, Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2002), Footnote, 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Effective (9)  |  Everyone (6)  |  Fact (325)  |  Guilt (5)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Innocence (5)  |  Nobody (14)  |  Novel (6)  |  Statement (28)  |  Suggestion (13)  |  Want (32)

A theory is the more impressive the greater the simplicity of its premises is, the more different kinds of things it relates, and the more extended is its area of applicability. Therefore the deep impression which classical thermodynamics made upon me. It is the only physical theory of universal content concerning which I am convinced that within the framework of the applicability of its basic concepts, it will never be overthrown.
Autobiographical Notes (1946), 33. Quoted in Gerald Holton and Yehuda Elkana, Albert Einstein: Historical and Cultural Perspectives (1997), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicability (2)  |  Area (3)  |  Basic (18)  |  Classical (7)  |  Concept (38)  |  Concern (30)  |  Content (17)  |  Convincing (6)  |  Difference (135)  |  Extension (12)  |  Framework (8)  |  Greater (16)  |  Impression (32)  |  Impressiveness (2)  |  Kind (27)  |  Overthrown (3)  |  Physical (28)  |  Premise (7)  |  Relation (35)  |  Theory (353)  |  Thermodynamics (17)  |  Universal (26)

All of today's DNA, strung through all the cells of the earth, is simply an extension and elaboration of [the] first molecule.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1979), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Cell (90)  |  DNA (50)  |  Earth (250)  |  Elaboration (4)  |  Extension (12)  |  First (42)  |  Molecule (82)  |  String (11)  |  Today (24)

Ask a scientist a very profound question on his science, and he will be silent. Ask a religious person a very simple question on his religion, and he will be frenzied.
Quotations: Superultramodern Science and Philosophy (2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Frenzy (3)  |  Profound (23)  |  Question (159)  |  Religion (120)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Silence (12)

At the outset do not be worried about this big question—Truth. It is a very simple matter if each one of you starts with the desire to get as much as possible. No human being is constituted to know the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; and even the best of men must be content with fragments, with partial glimpses, never the full fruition. In this unsatisfied quest the attitude of mind, the desire, the thirst—a thirst that from the soul must arise!—the fervent longing, are the be-all and the end-all.
'The Student Life' (1905). In G. L. Keynes (ed.), Selected Writings of Sir William Osler (1951), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (5)  |  Attitude (16)  |  Constitution (12)  |  Contentment (8)  |  Desire (46)  |  Fragment (13)  |  Glimpse (3)  |  Human Being (16)  |  Longing (4)  |  Mind (272)  |  Outset (2)  |  Quest (7)  |  Soul (54)  |  Thirst (7)  |  Truth (450)

Avoid complexities. Make everything as simple as possible.
As quoted in Joseph Wickham Roe, English and American Tool Builders (1916), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Complexity (51)  |  Making (18)

Beneath all the wealth of detail in a geological map lies an elegant, orderly simplicity.
As quoted G.D. Garland in obituary 'John Tuzo Wilson', Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (Nov 1995), 552.
Science quotes on:  |  Beneath (3)  |  Detail (33)  |  Elegant (5)  |  Geology (145)  |  Lie (23)  |  Map (12)  |  Order (60)  |  Wealth (29)

Besides it is an error to believe that rigour is the enemy of simplicity. On the contrary we find it confirmed by numerous examples that the rigorous method is at the same time the simpler and the more easily comprehended. The very effort for rigor forces us to find out simpler methods of proof.
'Mathematical Problems', Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (Jul 1902), 8, 441.
Science quotes on:  |  Rigour (9)

But it is just this characteristic of simplicity in the laws of nature hitherto discovered which it would be fallacious to generalize, for it is obvious that simplicity has been a part cause of their discovery, and can, therefore, give no ground for the supposition that other undiscovered laws are equally simple.
From Herbert Spencer lecture delivered at Oxford (1914) 'On Scientific Method in Philosophy', collected in Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays (1919), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (360)  |  Law (273)

Complexity is the prodigy of the world. Simplicity is the sensation of the universe. Behind complexity, there is always simplicity to be revealed. Inside simplicity, there is always complexity to be discovered
Gang Yu
In course Syllabus for 'Algorithm Design and Implementations' (2004) on mccombs.utexas.edu web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Complexity (51)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Prodigy (2)  |  Revelation (24)  |  Sensation (6)  |  Universe (291)  |  World (231)

Computers and rocket ships are examples of invention, not of understanding. ... All that is needed to build machines is the knowledge that when one thing happens, another thing happens as a result. It's an accumulation of simple patterns. A dog can learn patterns. There is no “why&rdqo; in those examples. We don't understand why electricity travels. We don't know why light travels at a constant speed forever. All we can do is observe and record patterns.
In God's Debris: A Thought Experiment (2004), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (16)  |  Building (34)  |  Computer (51)  |  Constant (14)  |  Dog (24)  |  Electricity (82)  |  Example (21)  |  Forever (14)  |  Happening (23)  |  Invention (174)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Learning (130)  |  Light (117)  |  Need (57)  |  Observation (264)  |  Record (22)  |  Rocket (18)  |  Ship (18)  |  Speed (11)  |  Travel (14)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Why (6)

Creation science has not entered the curriculum for a reason so simple and so basic that we often forget to mention it: because it is false, and because good teachers understand why it is false. What could be more destructive of that most fragile yet most precious commodity in our entire intellectual heritage—good teaching—than a bill forcing our honorable teachers to sully their sacred trust by granting equal treatment to a doctrine not only known to be false, but calculated to undermine any general understanding of science as an enterprise?.
In 'The Verdict on Creationism' The Sketical Inquirer (Winter 1987/88), 12, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (18)  |  Bill (8)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Commodity (2)  |  Creationism (5)  |  Curriculum (6)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Doctrine (33)  |  Enterprise (6)  |  Equal (22)  |  False (29)  |  Forcing (2)  |  Forgetting (8)  |  Fragile (3)  |  General (26)  |  Good (81)  |  Heritage (5)  |  Honor (3)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Mention (6)  |  Precious (8)  |  Sacred (8)  |  Science (875)  |  Teacher (54)  |  Treatment (61)  |  Trust (13)  |  Undermining (2)  |  Understanding (231)

During the time that [Karl] Landsteiner gave me an education in the field of imununology, I discovered that he and I were thinking about the serologic problem in very different ways. He would ask, What do these experiments force us to believe about the nature of the world? I would ask, What is the most. simple and general picture of the world that we can formulate that is not ruled by these experiments? I realized that medical and biological investigators were not attacking their problems the same way that theoretical physicists do, the way I had been in the habit of doing.
‘Molecular Disease’, Pfizer Spectrum (1958), 6:9, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (18)  |  Belief (139)  |  Difference (135)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Education (177)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Field (69)  |  Formulation (14)  |  Generality (14)  |  Habit (42)  |  Immunology (12)  |  Karl Landsteiner (8)  |  Medicine (185)  |  Nature (534)  |  Picture (25)  |  Problem (180)  |  Realization (22)  |  Rule (52)  |  Theoretical Physics (11)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Way (31)  |  World (231)

For every complex question there is a simple answer–and it's wrong.
Anonymous
Although often seen attributed to H.L. Mencken, webmaster has not found found a primary source, and no authoritative quote collection containing it. If you have a primary source, please contact webmaster, who meanwhile lists this quote as only being author unknown.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Complex (20)  |  Question (159)  |  Wrong (50)

For if as scientists we seek simplicity, then obviously we try the simplest surviving theory first, and retreat from it only when it proves false. Not this course, but any other, requires explanation. If you want to go somewhere quickly, and several alternate routes are equally likely to be open, no one asks why you take the shortest. The simplest theory is to be chosen not because it is the most likely to be true but because it is scientifically the most rewarding among equally likely alternatives. We aim at simplicity and hope for truth.
Problems and Projects (1972), 352.
Science quotes on:  |  Scientific Method (101)  |  Theory (353)  |  Truth (450)

Gases are distinguished from other forms of matter, not only by their power of indefinite expansion so as to fill any vessel, however large, and by the great effect heat has in dilating them, but by the uniformity and simplicity of the laws which regulate these changes.
Theory of Heat (1904), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Gas (30)  |  Law (273)

How to start on my adventure—how to become a forester—was not so simple. There were no schools of Forestry in America. ... Whoever turned his mind toward Forestry in those days thought little about the forest itself and more about its influences, and about its influence on rainfall first of all. So I took a course in meteorology, which has to do with weather and climate. and another in botany, which has to do with the vegetable kingdom—trees are unquestionably vegetable. And another in geology, for forests grow out of the earth. Also I took a course in astronomy, for it is the sun which makes trees grow. All of which is as it should be, because science underlies the forester's knowledge of the woods. So far I was headed right. But as for Forestry itself, there wasn't even a suspicion of it at Yale. The time for teaching Forestry as a profession was years away.
In Breaking New Ground (1947, 1998), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (105)  |  Biography (199)  |  Botany (30)  |  Climate (28)  |  Earth (250)  |  Forester (2)  |  Forestry (5)  |  Geology (145)  |  Growth (70)  |  Influence (47)  |  Kingdom (18)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Meteorology (15)  |  Profession (26)  |  Sun (115)  |  Suspicion (14)  |  Teaching (64)  |  Tree (88)  |  Underlie (2)  |  Vegetable (12)  |  Weather (10)  |  Wood (16)

I am a great believer in the simplicity of things and as you probably know I am inclined to hang on to broad & simple ideas like grim death until evidence is too strong for my tenacity.
Letter to Irving Langmuir (10 Jun 1919). Quoted in Nathan Reingold and Ida H. Reingold, Science in America: A Documentary History 1900-1939 (1981), 354.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Broad (7)  |  Death (183)  |  Evidence (83)  |  Grim (2)  |  Hang (2)  |  Inclination (10)  |  Strong (8)  |  Tenacity (2)

I could clearly see that the blood is divided and flows through tortuous vessels and that it is not poured out into spaces, but is always driven through tubules and distributed by the manifold bendings of the vessels... [F]rom the simplicity Nature employs in all her works, we may conclude... that the network I once believed to be nervous [that is, sinewy] is really a vessel intermingled with the vesicles and sinuses and carrying the mass of blood to them or away from them... though these elude even the keenest sight because of their small size... From these considerations it is highly probable that the question about the mutual union and anastomosis of the vessels can be solved; for if Nature once circulates the blood within vessels and combines their ends in a network, it is probable that they are joined by anastomosis at other times too.
'The Return to Bologna 1659-1662', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 1, 194-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Blood (63)  |  Capillary (3)  |  Circulation (12)  |  Nature (534)  |  Tissue (15)

I had a Meccano set with which I “played” endlessly. Meccano which was invented by Frank Hornby around 1900, is called Erector Set in the US. New toys (mainly Lego) have led to the extinction of Meccano and this has been a major disaster as far as the education of our young engineers and scientists is concerned. Lego is a technically trivial plaything and kids love it partly because it is so simple and partly because it is seductively coloured. However it is only a toy, whereas Meccano is a real engineering kit and it teaches one skill which I consider to be the most important that anyone can acquire: This is the sensitive touch needed to thread a nut on a bolt and tighten them with a screwdriver and spanner just enough that they stay locked, but not so tightly that the thread is stripped or they cannot be unscrewed. On those occasions (usually during a party at your house) when the handbasin tap is closed so tightly that you cannot turn it back on, you know the last person to use the washroom never had a Meccano set.
Nobel laureate autobiography in Les Prix Nobel/Nobel Lectures 1996 (1997), 189.
Science quotes on:  |   (26)  |  Acquire (7)  |  Bolt (3)  |  Colour (32)  |  Concern (30)  |  Disaster (15)  |  Education (177)  |  Engineer (32)  |  Engineering (60)  |  Extinction (38)  |  Important (20)  |  Invention (174)  |  Kid (4)  |  Kit (2)  |  Lock (2)  |  Meccano (5)  |  Need (57)  |  Nut (2)  |  Party (4)  |  Play (22)  |  Plaything (2)  |  Real (28)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Sensitive (5)  |  Skill (27)  |  Strip (3)  |  Tap (3)  |  Teach (19)  |  Technical (6)  |  Thread (6)  |  Touch (19)  |  Toy (8)  |  Trivial (14)  |  Young (20)

I have destroyed almost the whole race of frogs, which does not happen in that savage Batrachomyomachia of Homer. For in the anatomy of frogs, which, by favour of my very excellent colleague D. Carolo Fracassato, I had set on foot in order to become more certain about the membranous substance of the lungs, it happened to me to see such things that not undeservedly I can better make use of that [saying] of Homer for the present matter—
“I see with my eyes a work trusty and great.”
For in this (frog anatomy) owing to the simplicity of the structure, and the almost complete transparency of the vessels which admits the eye into the interior, things are more clearly shown so that they will bring the light to other more obscure matters.
De Pulmonibus (1661), trans. James Young, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine (1929-30), 23, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (32)  |  Certainty (59)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Eye (67)  |  Frog (24)  |  Great (62)  |  Homer (5)  |  Interior (8)  |  Lung (13)  |  Membrane (6)  |  Obscurity (9)  |  See (43)  |  Structure (104)  |  Transparency (3)  |  Vessel (9)  |  Work (198)

I know that most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it be such as would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives.
Attributed. Quoted in James GleickChaos (1988), 38. Contact webmaster if you know a primary print source.
Science quotes on:  |  Colleague (11)  |  Complexity (51)  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Problem (180)  |  Teach (19)  |  Truth (450)

I was sitting in a chair in the patent office at Bern when all of a sudden a thought occurred to me: “If a person falls freely he will not feel his own weight.” I was startled. This simple thought made a deep impression on me. It impelled me toward a theory of gravitation.
Lecture in Japan (1922). The quote is footnoted in Michael White, John Gribbin, Einstein: a Life in Science (1995), 128, saying the talk is known as the 'Kyoto address', reported in J. Ishiwara, Einstein Koen-Roku (1977).
Science quotes on:  |  Chair (6)  |  Deep (17)  |  Falling (3)  |  Feeling (47)  |  Free (13)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Impression (32)  |  Occurrence (21)  |  Patent Office (2)  |  Person (38)  |  Sitting (3)  |  Startling (4)  |  Sudden (6)  |  Theory Of Gravitation (3)  |  Thought (170)  |  Weight (41)

If I go out into nature, into the unknown, to the fringes of knowledge, everything seems mixed up and contradictory, illogical, and incoherent. This is what research does; it smooths out contradictions and makes things simple, logical, and coherent.
In 'Dionysians and Apollonians', Science (2 Jun 1972), 176, 966. Reprinted in Mary Ritchie Key, The Relationship of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication (1980), 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Coherence (4)  |  Contradiction (22)  |  Fringe (3)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Logic (132)  |  Mix (5)  |  Nature (534)  |  Research (360)  |  Smoothness (2)  |  Unknown (40)

If the brain were so simple that we could understand it, we would be so simple we couldn't.
Quoted by George E. Pugh, The Biological Origin of Human Values (1978), 154. In a footnote, the author writes that this quote comes his own father, around 1938. The quote is also widely seen attributed to Lyall Watson (born 1939), for example, by Larry Chang in Wisdom for the Soul: Five Millennia of Prescriptions for Spiritual Healing (2006), 539.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (106)  |  Understanding (231)

If this seems complex, the reason is because Tao is both simple and complex. It is complex when we try to understand it, and simple when we allow ourselves to experience it.
In Gary William Flake, The Computational Beauty of Nature (2000), 327.
Science quotes on:  |  Complexity (51)  |  Experience (132)  |  Tao (2)  |  Understanding (231)

If we seek for the simplest arrangement, which would enable it [the eye] to receive and discriminate the impressions of the different parts of the spectrum, we may suppose three distinct sensations only to be excited by the rays of the three principal pure colours, falling on any given point of the retina, the red, the green, and the violet; while the rays occupying the intermediate spaces are capable of producing mixed sensations, the yellow those which belong to the red and green, and the blue those which belong to the green and violet.
'Chromatics', in Supplement to the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Editions of the Encyclopedia Britannica (1824), Vol. 3, 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (25)  |  Blue (9)  |  Colour (32)  |  Discrimination (4)  |  Eye (67)  |  Green (9)  |  Impression (32)  |  Intermediate (10)  |  Mixed (2)  |  Reception (5)  |  Red (13)  |  Retina (2)  |  Seeking (17)  |  Spectrum (17)  |  Yellow (3)

In honoring the Wright Brothers, it is customary and proper to recognize their contribution to scientific progress. But I believe it is equally important to emphasize the qualities in their pioneering life and the character in man that such a life produced. The Wright Brothers balanced sucess with modesty, science with simplicity. At Kitty Hawk their intellects and senses worked in mutual support. They represented man in balance, and from that balance came wings to lift a world.
Speech, quoted in Leonard Mosley, Lindbergh (2000), 347. In 1949, Lindbergh gave a speech when he received the Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (24)  |  Biography (199)  |  Character (39)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Life (460)  |  Man (258)  |  Modesty (3)  |  Pioneer (8)  |  Progress (200)  |  Represent (4)  |  Science (875)  |  Scientific Progress (12)  |  Sense (104)  |  Success (114)  |  Support (26)  |  Wing (16)  |  Orville Wright (4)  |  Wilbur Wright (7)

In my view, aiming at simplicity and lucidity is a moral duty of all intellectuals: lack of clarity is a sin, and pretentiousness is a crime.
Objective Knowledge: an Evolutionary Approach (1972), 44
Science quotes on:  |  Clarity (24)  |  Crime (11)  |  Duty (26)  |  Intellectual (13)  |  Lack (14)  |  Lucidity (2)  |  Moral (38)  |  Sin (13)

In physics we deal with states of affairs much simpler than those of psychology and yet we again and again learn that our task is not to investigate the essence of things—we do not at all know what this would mean&mash;but to develop those concepts that allow us to speak with each other about the events of nature in a fruitful manner.
Letter to H.P.E. Hansen (20 Jul 1935), Niels Bohr Archive. In Jan Faye, Henry J. Folse, Niels Bohr and Contemporary Philosophy (1994), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (10)  |  Again (3)  |  Allow (5)  |  Concept (38)  |  Dealing (4)  |  Development (122)  |  Essence (19)  |  Event (49)  |  Fruitful (9)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Learning (130)  |  Manner (11)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Nature (534)  |  Physics (156)  |  Psychology (69)  |  Speaking (30)  |  State (43)  |  Task (32)  |  Thing (27)

In the simplest array of digits [Ramanujan] detected wonderful properties: congruences, symmetries and relationships which had escaped the notice of even the outstandingly gifted theoreticians.
In The World of Mathematics (1956), 367.
Science quotes on:  |  Array (3)  |  Detection (6)  |  Escape (14)  |  Gifted (3)  |  Notice (11)  |  Outstanding (3)  |  Property (46)  |  Srinivasa Ramanujan (10)  |  Relationship (37)  |  Symmetry (14)  |  Theoretician (5)  |  Wonder (64)

In this communication I wish first to show in the simplest case of the hydrogen atom (nonrelativistic and undistorted) that the usual rates for quantization can be replaced by another requirement, in which mention of “whole numbers” no longer occurs. Instead the integers occur in the same natural way as the integers specifying the number of nodes in a vibrating string. The new conception can be generalized, and I believe it touches the deepest meaning of the quantum rules.
'Quantisierung als Eigenwertproblem', Annalen der Physik (1926), 79, 361. Trans. Walter Moore, Schrödinger: Life and Thought (1989), 200-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Case (16)  |  Communication (37)  |  Hydrogen (25)  |  Integer (3)  |  Requirement (27)  |  String (11)  |  Vibration (9)

Is evolution a theory, a system or a hypothesis? It is much more: it is a general condition to which all theories, all hypotheses, all systems must bow and which they must satisfy henceforth if they are to be thinkable and true. Evolution is a light illuminating all facts, a curve that all lines must follow. ... The consciousness of each of us is evolution looking at itself and reflecting upon itself....Man is not the center of the universe as once we thought in our simplicity, but something much more wonderful—the arrow pointing the way to the final unification of the world in terms of life. Man alone constitutes the last-born, the freshest, the most complicated, the most subtle of all the successive layers of life. ... The universe has always been in motion and at this moment continues to be in motion. But will it still be in motion tomorrow? ... What makes the world in which we live specifically modern is our discovery in it and around it of evolution. ... Thus in all probability, between our modern earth and the ultimate earth, there stretches an immense period, characterized not by a slowing-down but a speeding up and by the definitive florescence of the forces of evolution along the line of the human shoot.
In The Phenomenon of Man (1975), pp 218, 220, 223, 227, 228, 277.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrow (8)  |  Bow (4)  |  Center (7)  |  Characterize (4)  |  Complicated (14)  |  Condition (68)  |  Consciousness (36)  |  Constitute (5)  |  Curve (9)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Earth (250)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Fact (325)  |  Final (13)  |  Follow (20)  |  General (26)  |  Human (168)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Illuminating (2)  |  Immense (6)  |  Layer (8)  |  Life (460)  |  Light (117)  |  Line (18)  |  Live (14)  |  Looking (15)  |  Modern (44)  |  Moment (21)  |  Motion (64)  |  Period (24)  |  Pointing (3)  |  Probability (56)  |  Reflecting (2)  |  Satisfy (5)  |  Shoot (3)  |  Subtle (6)  |  Successive (5)  |  System (66)  |  Term (34)  |  Theory (353)  |  Thought (170)  |  Tomorrow (14)  |  True (29)  |  Ultimate (27)  |  Unification (5)  |  Universe (291)  |  Wonderful (9)  |  World (231)

It is always the nearest, plainest and simplest principles that learned men comprehend last.
In Elbert Hubbard (ed. and publ.), The Philistine (Mar 1908), 26, No. 4, cover.
Science quotes on:  |  Always (5)  |  Comprehension (30)  |  Learning (130)  |  Nearest (3)  |  Principle (97)

It is often claimed that knowledge multiplies so rapidly that nobody can follow it. I believe this is incorrect. At least in science it is not true. The main purpose of science is simplicity and as we understand more things, everything is becoming simpler. This, of course, goes contrary to what everyone accepts.
Edward Teller, Wendy Teller, Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2002), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (31)  |  Becoming (7)  |  Belief (139)  |  Claim (24)  |  Contrary (6)  |  Everyone (6)  |  Everything (38)  |  Following (12)  |  Incorrect (4)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Main (6)  |  Multiplication (11)  |  Nobody (14)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Science (875)  |  Thing (27)  |  Truth (450)  |  Understanding (231)

It is remarkable that when great discoveries are effected, their simplicity always seems to detract from their originality: on these occasions we are reminded of the egg of Columbus!
Curiosities of Literature (1824), Vol. 3, 277-278.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (360)  |  Originality (7)

It would seem that more than function itself, simplicity is the deciding factor in the aesthetic equation. One might call the process beauty through function and simplification.
As quoted in Christian Science Monitor (7 May 1952).
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (10)  |  Beauty (88)  |  Call (11)  |  Decision (30)  |  Equation (46)  |  Factor (15)  |  Function (41)  |  Invention (174)  |  Process (97)

Let us ... consider the ovum [egg] as a physical system. Its potentialities are prodigious and one's first impulse is to expect that such vast potentialities would find expression in complexity of structure. But what do we find? The substance is clouded with particles, but these can be centrifuged away leaving it optically structureless but still capable of development.... On the surface of the egg there is a fine membrane, below it fluid of high viscosity, next fluid of relatively low viscosity, and within this the nucleus, which in the resting stage is simply a bag of fluid enclosed in a delicate membrane.... The egg's simplicity is not that of a machine or a crystal, but that of a nebula. Gathered into it are units relatively simple but capable by their combinations of forming a vast number of dynamical systems...
As guest of honour, closing day address (Jun 1928), Sixth Colloid Symposium, Toronto, Canada, 'Living Matter', printed in Harry Boyer Weiser (ed.), Colloid Symposium Monograph (1928), Vol. 6, 15. Quoted in Joseph Needham, Chemical Embryology (1931), Vol. 1, 612-613.
Science quotes on:  |  Combination (37)  |  Complexity (51)  |  Consider (12)  |  Crystal (22)  |  Dynamic (6)  |  Egg (27)  |  Machine (56)  |  Membrane (6)  |  Nebula (13)  |  Nucleus (21)  |  Ovum (2)  |  Potential (15)  |  Prodigious (4)  |  System (66)  |  Viscosity (3)

Life and business are rather simple after all—to make a success of either, you've got to hang on to the knack of putting yourself into the other person's place.
c. 1891. On Wrigley Company web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (27)  |  Life (460)  |  Other (17)  |  Person (38)  |  Place (32)  |  Putting (2)  |  Success (114)  |  Yourself (4)

Montaigne simply turns his mind loose and writes whatever he feels like writing. Mostly, he wants to say that reason is not a special, unique gift of human beings, marking us off from the rest of nature.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1979), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Feeling (47)  |  Gift (26)  |  Human Being (16)  |  Mark (14)  |  Mind (272)  |  Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (10)  |  Nature (534)  |  Reason (173)  |  Rest (28)  |  Special (25)  |  Turning (5)  |  Uniqueness (2)  |  Want (32)  |  Whatever (4)  |  Writing (50)

My colleagues in elementary particle theory in many lands [and I] are driven by the usual insatiable curiosity of the scientist, and our work is a delightful game. I am frequently astonished that it so often results in correct predictions of experimental results. How can it be that writing down a few simple and elegant formulae, like short poems governed by strict rules such as those of the sonnet or the waka, can predict universal regularities of Nature?
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1969), in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.),Les Prix Nobel en 1969 (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishment (14)  |  Colleague (11)  |  Correctness (9)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Delight (22)  |  Drive (14)  |  Elegance (13)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Formula (29)  |  Frequently (8)  |  Game (28)  |  Government (50)  |  Insatiable (2)  |  Nature (534)  |  Particle Physics (4)  |  Poem (76)  |  Prediction (48)  |  Regularity (11)  |  Result (129)  |  Rule (52)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Sonnet (3)  |  Strict (2)  |  Universality (9)  |  Work (198)  |  Writing (50)

Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.
In Isaac Newton and Andrew Motte (trans.), The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1803), Vol. 2, 160. Newton's comment on his Rules of Reasoning Philosophy, Rule 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (3)  |  Cause (122)  |  Less (15)  |  Nature (534)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Pomp (2)  |  Serve (13)  |  Vain (15)

Now, we propose in the first place to show, that this law of organic progress is the law of all progress. Whether it be in the development of the Earth, in the development in Life upon its surface, in the development of Society, of Government, of Manufactures, of Commerce, of Language, Literature, Science, Art, this same evolution of the simple into the complex, through a process of continuous differentiation, holds throughout. From the earliest traceable cosmical changes down to the latest results of civilization, we shall find that the transformation of the homogeneous into the heterogeneous is that in which Progress essentially consists.
'Progress: Its Law and Cause', Westminster Review (1857), 67, 446-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (80)  |  Change (133)  |  Civilization (90)  |  Commerce (9)  |  Complexity (51)  |  Continuous (7)  |  Cosmos (23)  |  Development (122)  |  Differentiation (11)  |  Earth (250)  |  Government (50)  |  Heterogeneity (3)  |  Homogeneity (3)  |  Language (71)  |  Law (273)  |  Life (460)  |  Literature (33)  |  Manufacturing (16)  |  Organic (19)  |  Progress (200)  |  Proposition (28)  |  Science (875)  |  Society (84)  |  Surface (37)  |  Trace (10)  |  Transformation (27)

One should not understand this compulsion to construct concepts, species, forms, purposes, laws ('a world of identical cases') as if they enabled us to fix the real world; but as a compulsion to arrange a world for ourselves in which our existence is made possible:—we thereby create a world which is calculable, simplified, comprehensible, etc., for us.
The Will to Power (Notes written 1883-1888), book 3, no. 521. Trans. W. Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale and ed. W. Kaufmann (1968), 282.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (41)  |  Comprehension (30)  |  Compulsion (6)  |  Concept (38)  |  Construct (6)  |  Enable (10)  |  Existence (150)  |  Form (70)  |  Identical (9)  |  Law (273)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Real (28)  |  Species (96)  |  Understanding (231)

People wonder why the novel is the most popular form of literature; people wonder why it is read more than books of science or books of metaphysics. The reason is very simple; it is merely that the novel is more true than they are. … In the fiery alphabet of every sunset is written “to be continued in our next.”
'On Certain Modern Writers and the institution of the Family' Heretics (1903). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Alphabet (4)  |  Book (100)  |  Continuation (13)  |  Fire (59)  |  Form (70)  |  Literature (33)  |  Metaphysics (24)  |  Next (4)  |  Novel (6)  |  People (72)  |  Popular (10)  |  Reading (25)  |  Reason (173)  |  Science (875)  |  Sunset (6)  |  Truth (450)  |  Wonder (64)  |  Writing (50)

Perhaps we see equations as simple because they are easily expressed in terms of mathematical notation already invented at an earlier stage of development of the science, and thus what appears to us as elegance of description really reflects the interconnectedness of Nature's laws at different levels.
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1969), in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.),Les Prix Nobel en 1969 (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Description (40)  |  Development (122)  |  Difference (135)  |  Early (10)  |  Ease (20)  |  Elegance (13)  |  Equation (46)  |  Expression (44)  |  Invention (174)  |  Law (273)  |  Level (16)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Nature (534)  |  Notation (6)  |  Reflection (26)  |  Term (34)

Physics, owing to the simplicity of its subject matter, has reached a higher state of development than any other science. (1931)
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Physics (156)

Prejudice for regularity and simplicity is a source of error that has only too often infected philosophy.
'De litteraria expeditione per pontificiam ditionem', Accademia della scienze, Bologna, Commentarii, 1757, 4, 353, 361. Trans. J. L. Heilbron, Weighing Imponderables and Other Quantitative Science around 1800 (1993), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (152)

Progress is man's ability to complicate simplicity.
Quoted in Richard R. Lineman, 'Two-Way Ticket to Paradise', book review of Thor Heyerdahl, Fatu-Hiva, in New York Times (29 Aug 1975), 58, col. 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (37)  |  Complication (16)  |  Progress (200)

Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is simple in principle.
'Radioimmunoassay: A Probe for the Fine Structure of Biologic Systems', Nobel Lecture, 1977. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1971-1980 (1992), 450.
Science quotes on:  |  Principle (97)

Science attempts to find logic and simplicity in nature. Mathematics attempts to establish order and simplicity in human thought.
The Pursuit of Simplicity (1980), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (41)  |  Logic (132)  |  Nature (534)  |  Science (875)

Science has thus, most unexpectedly, placed in our hands a new power of great but unknown energy. It does not wake the winds from their caverns; nor give wings to water by the urgency of heat; nor drive to exhaustion the muscular power of animals; nor operate by complicated mechanism; nor summon any other form of gravitating force, but, by the simplest means—the mere contact of metallic surfaces of small extent, with feeble chemical agents, a power everywhere diffused through nature, but generally concealed from our senses, is mysteriously evolved, and by circulation in insulated wires, it is still more mysteriously augmented, a thousand and a thousand fold, until it breaks forth with incredible energy.
Comment upon 'The Notice of the Electro-Magnetic Machine of Mr. Thomas Davenport, of Brandon, near Rutland, Vermont, U.S.', The Annals of Electricity, Magnetism, & Chemistry; and Guardian of Experimental Science (1838), 2, 263.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (143)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Cavern (3)  |  Circulation (12)  |  Complicated (14)  |  Concealment (7)  |  Contact (12)  |  Electromagnetism (14)  |  Energy (103)  |  Exhaustion (11)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Heat (48)  |  Means (25)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Mere (9)  |  Metal (19)  |  Muscle (24)  |  Mystery (74)  |  Operation (53)  |  Power (103)  |  Science (875)  |  Sense (104)  |  Summon (3)  |  Unknown (40)  |  Water (122)  |  Wind (28)  |  Wing (16)  |  Wire (10)

Science simply cannot adjudicate the issue of God’s possible superintendence of nature.
In ‘Impeaching a Self-Appointed Judge’, Scientific American (Jul 1992), 119. Cited in Gerald L. Schroeder The Science of God: The Convergence of Scientific and Biblical Wisdom (2009), 18 & 220.
Science quotes on:  |  God (234)  |  Issue (14)  |  Nature (534)  |  Science (875)  |  Science And Religion (159)

Scientific progress is the discovery of a more and more comprehensive simplicity... The previous successes give us confidence in the future of science: we become more and more conscious of the fact that the universe is cognizable.
In O. Godart and M. Heller (eds.), Cosmology of Lemaitre (1985), 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (360)  |  Progress (200)  |  Scientific Progress (12)  |  Success (114)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Universe (291)

Simple molecules combine to make powerful chemicals. Simple cells combine to make powerful life-forms. Simple electronics combine to make powerful computers. Logically, all things are created by a combination of simpler, less capable components. Therefore, a supreme being must be in our future, not our origin. What if "God" is the consciousness that will be created when enough of us are connected by the Internet?!!
Thoughts by character Dogbert in Dilbert cartoon strip (11 Feb 1996).
Science quotes on:  |  Capability (27)  |  Cell (90)  |  Chemical (38)  |  Combination (37)  |  Component (6)  |  Computer (51)  |  Connection (39)  |  Consciousness (36)  |  Creation (129)  |  Electronics (6)  |  Future (110)  |  God (234)  |  Internet (7)  |  Life (460)  |  Life-Form (4)  |  Logic (132)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Origin (36)  |  Power (103)  |  Science And Religion (159)

Sir Hiram Maxim is a genuine and typical example of the man of science, romantic, excitable, full of real but somewhat obvious poetry, a little hazy in logic and philosophy, but full of hearty enthusiasm and an honorable simplicity. He is, as he expresses it, “an old and trained engineer,” and is like all of the old and trained engineers I have happened to come across, a man who indemnifies himself for the superhuman or inhuman concentration required for physical science by a vague and dangerous romanticism about everything else.
In G.K. Chesterton, 'The Maxims of Maxim', Daily News (25 Feb 1905). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (199)  |  Concentration (6)  |  Danger (32)  |  Else (4)  |  Engineer (32)  |  Enthusiasm (20)  |  Everything (38)  |  Example (21)  |  Excitement (20)  |  Expression (44)  |  Full (10)  |  Genuine (9)  |  Honour (20)  |  Logic (132)  |  Sir Hiram Maxim (4)  |  Men Of Science (90)  |  Obvious (24)  |  Old (23)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Physical Science (32)  |  Poetry (63)  |  Real (28)  |  Requirement (27)  |  Romance (6)  |  Romanticism (3)  |  Somewhat (2)  |  Superhuman (2)  |  Training (21)  |  Typical (6)  |  Vagueness (8)

Technical skill is mastery of complexity while creativity is mastery of simplicity.
In Catastrophe Theory: selected papers, 1972-1977 (1977).
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (20)  |  Skill (27)

That the fundamental aspects of heredity should have turned out to be so extraordinarily simple supports us in the hope that nature may, after all, be entirely approachable. Her much-advertised inscrutability has once more been found to be an illusion due to our ignorance. This is encouraging, for, if the world in which we live were as complicated as some of our friends would have us believe we might well despair that biology could ever become an exact science.
The Physical Basis of Heredity (1919), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (83)  |  Complication (16)  |  Despair (13)  |  Exact (16)  |  Heredity (43)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Illusion (14)  |  Inscrutability (2)

The advance from the simple to the complex, through a process of successive differentiations, is seen alike in the earliest changes of the Universe to which we can reason our way back, and in the earliest changes which we can inductively establish; it is seen in the geologic and climatic evolution of the Earth; it is seen in the unfolding of every single organism on its surface, and in the multiplication of kinds of organisms; it is seen in the evolution of Humanity, whether contemplated in the civilized individual, or in the aggregate of races; it is seen in the evolution of Society in respect alike of its political, its religious, and its economical organization; and it is seen in the evolution of all those endless concrete and abstract products of human activity which constitute the environment of our daily life. From the remotest past which Science can fathom, up to the novelties of yesterday, that in which Progress essentially consists, is the transformation of the homogeneous into the heterogeneous.
Progress: Its Law and Cause (1857), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (19)  |  Activity (48)  |  Advancement (26)  |  Aggregation (4)  |  Change (133)  |  Civilization (90)  |  Climate (28)  |  Complexity (51)  |  Concrete (7)  |  Contemplation (17)  |  Daily Life (3)  |  Differentiation (11)  |  Early (10)  |  Earth (250)  |  Economy (25)  |  Environment (75)  |  Establishment (19)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Fathom (3)  |  Geology (145)  |  Heterogeneity (3)  |  Homogeneity (3)  |  Humanity (46)  |  Individual (59)  |  Induction (22)  |  Kind (27)  |  Multiplication (11)  |  Novelty (9)  |  Organism (70)  |  Organization (51)  |  Past (42)  |  Politics (52)  |  Process (97)  |  Product (33)  |  Race (36)  |  Reason (173)  |  Religion (120)  |  Remoteness (4)  |  Society (84)  |  Succession (30)  |  Surface (37)  |  Transformation (27)  |  Unfolding (5)  |  Universe (291)  |  Yesterday (3)

The aim of science is not things themselves, as the dogmatists in their simplicity imagine, but the relation between things.
Science and Hypothesis, translated by William John Greenstreet, (1905, 1952), xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (21)  |  Dogmatist (2)  |  Imagine (10)  |  Relationship (37)  |  Science (875)

The beauty of physics lies in the extent which seemingly complex and unrelated phenomena can be explained and correlated through a high level of abstraction by a set of laws which are amazing in their simplicity.
In Principles of Electrodynamics (1972, 1987), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (10)  |  Amazing (7)  |  Beauty (88)  |  Complex (20)  |  Correlation (5)  |  Explaination (2)  |  Law (273)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Physics (156)  |  Unrelated (3)

The first [quality] to be named must always be the power of attention, of giving one's whole mind to the patient without the interposition of anything of oneself. It sounds simple but only the very greatest doctors ever fully attain it. ... The second thing to be striven for is intuition. This sounds an impossibility, for who can control that small quiet monitor? But intuition is only interference from experience stored and not actively recalled. ... The last aptitude I shall mention that must be attained by the good physician is that of handling the sick man's mind.
In The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Aptitude (6)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Attention (37)  |  Control (41)  |  Doctor (54)  |  Experience (132)  |  Greatness (24)  |  Handling (3)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Interference (7)  |  Interposition (2)  |  Intuition (26)  |  Mention (6)  |  Mind (272)  |  Monitor (2)  |  Patient (54)  |  Physician (172)  |  Quality (29)  |  Recall (3)  |  Sickness (15)  |  Store (6)  |  Strive (7)

The genius of Laplace was a perfect sledge hammer in bursting purely mathematical obstacles; but, like that useful instrument, it gave neither finish nor beauty to the results. In truth, in truism if the reader please, Laplace was neither Lagrange nor Euler, as every student is made to feel. The second is power and symmetry, the third power and simplicity; the first is power without either symmetry or simplicity. But, nevertheless, Laplace never attempted investigation of a subject without leaving upon it the marks of difficulties conquered: sometimes clumsily, sometimes indirectly, always without minuteness of design or arrangement of detail; but still, his end is obtained and the difficulty is conquered.
'Review of "Théorie Analytique des Probabilites" par M. le Marquis de Laplace, 3eme edition. Paris. 1820', Dublin Review (1837), 2, 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (88)  |  Clumsiness (2)  |  Design (37)  |  Detail (33)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Leonhard Euler (5)  |  Genius (92)  |  Instrument (40)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (9)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (45)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Obstacle (9)  |  Power (103)  |  Result (129)  |  Student (54)  |  Symmetry (14)

The Greeks made Space the subject-matter of a science of supreme simplicity and certainty. Out of it grew, in the mind of classical antiquity, the idea of pure science. Geometry became one of the most powerful expressions of that sovereignty of the intellect that inspired the thought of those times. At a later epoch, when the intellectual despotism of the Church, which had been maintained through the Middle Ages, had crumbled, and a wave of scepticism threatened to sweep away all that had seemed most fixed, those who believed in Truth clung to Geometry as to a rock, and it was the highest ideal of every scientist to carry on his science 'more geometrico.'
In Space,Time, Matter, translated by Henry Leopold Brose (1952), 1
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquity (5)  |  Belief (139)  |  Certainty (59)  |  Church (16)  |  Epoch (2)  |  Expression (44)  |  Fixed (6)  |  Geometry (68)  |  Greek (17)  |  Grow (4)  |  Ideal (26)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Later (4)  |  Maintain (10)  |  Middle Ages (3)  |  Powerful (14)  |  Pure Science (7)  |  Rock (54)  |  Science (875)  |  Seem (12)  |  Skepticism (9)  |  Sovereignty (2)  |  Space (68)  |  Subject (51)  |  Supreme (8)  |  Sweep (3)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Truth (450)  |  Wave (32)

The method of science depends on our attempts to describe the world with simple theories: theories that are complex may become untestable, even if they happen to be true. Science may be described as the art of systematic over-simplification—the art of discerning what we may with advantage omit.
Karl Raimund Popper and William Warren Bartley (ed.), The Open Universe: an Argument for Indeterminism (1991), 44. by Karl Raimund Popper, William Warren Bartley - Science - 1991
Science quotes on:  |  Complexity (51)  |  Description (40)  |  Discern (2)  |  Omit (3)  |  Scientific Method (101)  |  Test (46)  |  Theory (353)  |  Truth (450)

The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what it was in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence that at a given instant comprehends all the relations of the entities of this universe, it could state the respective position, motions, and general affects of all these entities at any time in the past or future. Physical astronomy, the branch of knowledge that does the greatest honor to the human mind, gives us an idea, albeit imperfect, of what such an intelligence would be. The simplicity of the law by which the celestial bodies move, and the relations of their masses and distances, permit analysis to follow their motions up to a certain point; and in order to determine the state of the system of these great bodies in past or future centuries, it suffices for the mathematician that their position and their velocity be given by observation for any moment in time. Man owes that advantage to the power of the instrument he employs, and to the small number of relations that it embraces in its calculations. But ignorance of the different causes involved in the production of events, as well as their complexity, taken together with the imperfection of analysis, prevents our reaching the same certainty about the vast majority of phenomena. Thus there are things that are uncertain for us, things more or less probable, and we seek to compensate for the impossibility of knowing them by determining their different degrees of likelihood. So it was that we owe to the weakness of the human mind one of the most delicate and ingenious of mathematical theories, the science of chance or probability.
'Recherches, 1º, sur l'Intégration des Équations Différentielles aux Différences Finies, et sur leur Usage dans la Théorie des Hasards' (1773, published 1776). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 8, 144-5, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (82)  |  Astronomy (105)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Celestial (5)  |  Certainty (59)  |  Chance (77)  |  Complexity (51)  |  Difference (135)  |  Distance (26)  |  Event (49)  |  Honour (20)  |  Human Mind (21)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Instrument (40)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Law (273)  |  Likelihood (3)  |  Mass (23)  |  Mathematician (110)  |  Motion (64)  |  Nature (534)  |  Observation (264)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Position (18)  |  Prediction (48)  |  Probability (56)  |  Relation (35)  |  Theory (353)  |  Time (170)  |  Uncertainty (25)  |  Universe (291)  |  Velocity (5)  |  Weakness (14)

The process of discovery is very simple. An unwearied and systematic application of known laws to nature, causes the unknown to reveal themselves. Almost any mode of observation will be successful at last, for what is most wanted is method.
A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1873), 384.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (72)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Law (273)  |  Method (73)  |  Mode (8)  |  Nature (534)  |  Observation (264)  |  Process (97)  |  Revelation (24)  |  Success (114)  |  System (66)  |  Unknown (40)  |  Want (32)  |  Weariness (3)

The progress of synthesis, or the building up of natural materials from their constituent elements, proceeds apace. Even some of the simpler albuminoids, a class of substances of great importance in the life process, have recently been artificially prepared. ... Innumerable entirely new compounds have been produced in the last century. The artificial dye-stuffs, prepared from materials occurring in coal-tar, make the natural colours blush. Saccharin, which is hundreds of times sweeter than sugar, is a purely artificial substance. New explosives, drugs, alloys, photographic substances, essences, scents, solvents, and detergents are being poured out in a continuous stream.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 45-46.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial (13)  |  Blush (3)  |  Building (34)  |  Century (38)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Class (27)  |  Coal Tar (2)  |  Colour (32)  |  Compound (35)  |  Constituent (8)  |  Continuous (7)  |  Drug (31)  |  Element (68)  |  Entirely (6)  |  Essence (19)  |  Explosive (7)  |  Great (62)  |  Hundred (11)  |  Importance (106)  |  Innumerable (10)  |  Last (13)  |  Life (460)  |  Material (60)  |  Natural (48)  |  New (107)  |  Occurrence (21)  |  Photograph (14)  |  Pour (4)  |  Preparation (22)  |  Proceeding (10)  |  Process (97)  |  Production (72)  |  Progress (200)  |  Purely (4)  |  Recent (14)  |  Saccharin (2)  |  Scent (3)  |  Solvent (3)  |  Stream (10)  |  Substance (39)  |  Sugar (8)  |  Synthesis (23)

The research worker, in his efforts to express the fundamental laws of Nature in mathematical form, should strive mainly for mathematical beauty. He should take simplicity into consideration in a subordinate way to beauty ... It often happens that the requirements of simplicity and beauty are the same, but where they clash, the latter must take precedence.
"Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1939), 59 122. In A. Pais, 'Playing With Equations, the Dirac Way'. Behram N. Kursunoglu (Ed.) and Eugene Paul Wigner (Ed.), Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac: Reminiscences about a Great Physicist (1990), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (88)  |  Law (273)  |  Research (360)

The simplicity of nature is not to be measured by that of our conceptions. Infinitely varied in its effects, nature is simple only in its causes, and its economy consists in producing a great number of phenomena, often very complicated, by means of a small number of general laws.
Philosophical Essay on Probabilities (1825), trans. Andrew I. Dale (1995), book 1, chap. 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)  |  Complicated (14)  |  Conception (29)  |  Economy (25)  |  Effect (72)  |  Law (273)  |  Nature (534)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Variation (34)

The solutions put forth by imperialism are the quintessence of simplicity...When they speak of the problems of population and birth, they are in no way moved by concepts related to the interests of the family or of society...Just when science and technology are making incredible advances in all fields, they resort to technology to suppress revolutions and ask the help of science to prevent population growth. In short, the peoples are not to make revolutions, and women are not to give birth. This sums up the philosophy of imperialism.
From Fidel Castro (1968).
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (52)  |  Birth (47)  |  Concept (38)  |  Family (15)  |  Incredible (7)  |  Interest (82)  |  People (72)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Population (41)  |  Population Growth (4)  |  Quintessence (2)  |  Revolution (34)  |  Science (875)  |  Society (84)  |  Solution (109)  |  Speaking (30)  |  Suppression (4)  |  Technology (98)  |  Women (5)

The Unexpected stalks a farm in big boots like a vagrant bent on havoc. Not every farmer is an inventor, but the good ones have the seeds of invention within them. Economy and efficiency move their relentless tinkering and yet the real motive often seems to be aesthetic. The mind that first designed a cutter bar is not far different from a mind that can take the intractable steel of an outsized sickle blade and make it hum in the end. The question is how to reduce the simplicity that constitutes a problem (“It's simple; it's broke.”) to the greater simplicity that constitutes a solution.
In Making Hay (2003), 33-34.
Science quotes on:  |  Aestheticism (2)  |  Blade (3)  |  Boot (2)  |  Economy (25)  |  Efficiency (15)  |  Farm (4)  |  Farmer (9)  |  Havoc (3)  |  Hum (2)  |  Invention (174)  |  Inventor (25)  |  Mind (272)  |  Motive (9)  |  Problem (180)  |  Question (159)  |  Reduce (10)  |  Relentless (3)  |  Seed (19)  |  Solution (109)  |  Stalk (2)  |  Steel (5)  |  Tinkering (2)  |  Unexpected (13)  |  Vagrant (2)

The world is very complicated and it is clearly impossible for the human mind to understand it completely. Man has therefore devised an artifice which permits the complicated nature of the world to be blamed on something which is called accidental and thus permits him to abstract a domain in which simple laws can be found.
In Floyd Merrell, Unthinking Thinking: Jorge Luis Borges, Mathematics, and the New Physics (1991), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (19)  |  Accident (25)  |  Artifice (2)  |  Blame (4)  |  Completeness (9)  |  Complication (16)  |  Devising (5)  |  Domain (6)  |  Find (50)  |  Human Mind (21)  |  Impossible (26)  |  Law (273)  |  Man (258)  |  Nature (534)  |  Permit (8)  |  Understanding (231)  |  World (231)

There is synthesis when, in combining therein judgments that are made known to us from simpler relations, one deduces judgments from them relative to more complicated relations.
There is analysis when from a complicated truth one deduces more simple truths.
In James R. Hofmann, André-Marie Ampère (1996), 158. Cites Académie des Sciences Ampère Archives, lecture notes, box 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (82)  |  Combination (37)  |  Complication (16)  |  Deduction (39)  |  Judgment (39)  |  Relation (35)  |  Synthesis (23)  |  Truth (450)

There was, I think, a feeling that the best science was that done in the simplest way. In experimental work, as in mathematics, there was “style” and a result obtained with simple equipment was more elegant than one obtained with complicated apparatus, just as a mathematical proof derived neatly was better than one involving laborious calculations. Rutherford's first disintegration experiment, and Chadwick's discovery of the neutron had a “style” that is different from that of experiments made with giant accelerators.
From 'Physics in a University Laboratory Before and After World War II', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series A, (1975), 342, 463. As cited in Alan McComas, Galvani's Spark: The Story of the Nerve Impulse (2011), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Accelerator (4)  |  Apparatus (18)  |  Best (42)  |  Better (41)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Sir James Chadwick (2)  |  Complicated (14)  |  Derivation (8)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Disintegration (2)  |  Elegance (13)  |  Equipment (11)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Feeling (47)  |  Giant (15)  |  Labor (18)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Neatness (3)  |  Neutron (7)  |  Obtain (14)  |  Obtaining (4)  |  Proof (136)  |  Result (129)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (30)  |  Science (875)  |  Style (5)

These Disciplines [mathematics] serve to inure and corroborate the Mind to a constant Diligence in Study; to undergo the Trouble of an attentive Meditation, and cheerfully contend with such Difficulties as lie in the Way. They wholly deliver us from a credulous Simplicity, most strongly fortify us against the Vanity of Scepticism, effectually restrain from a rash Presumption, most easily incline us to a due Assent, perfectly subject us to the Government of right Reason, and inspire us with Resolution to wrestle against the unjust Tyranny of false Prejudices. If the Fancy be unstable and fluctuating, it is to be poized by this Ballast, and steadied by this Anchor, if the Wit be blunt it is sharpened upon this Whetstone; if luxuriant it is pared by this Knife; if headstrong it is restrained by this Bridle; and if dull it is rouzed by this Spur. The Steps are guided by no Lamp more clearly through the dark Mazes of Nature, by no Thread more surely through the intricate Labyrinths of Philosophy, nor lastly is the Bottom of Truth sounded more happily by any other Line. I will not mention how plentiful a Stock of Knowledge the Mind is furnished from these, with what wholesome Food it is nourished, and what sincere Pleasure it enjoys. But if I speak farther, I shall neither be the only Person, nor the first, who affirms it; that while the Mind is abstracted and elevated from sensible Matter, distinctly views pure Forms, conceives the Beauty of Ideas, and investigates the Harmony of Proportions; the Manners themselves are sensibly corrected and improved, the Affections composed and rectified, the Fancy calmed and settled, and the Understanding raised and excited to more divine Contemplations. All which I might defend by Authority, and confirm by the Suffrages of the greatest Philosophers.
Prefatory Oration in Mathematical Lectures (1734), xxxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Anchor (2)  |  Ballast (2)  |  Beauty (88)  |  Contemplation (17)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Diligence (7)  |  Discipline (15)  |  Idea (226)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Labyrinth (5)  |  Lamp (7)  |  Maze (6)  |  Meditation (4)  |  Mind (272)  |  Nature (534)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Prejudice (31)  |  Presumption (6)  |  Reason (173)  |  Scepticism (3)  |  Sharpen (5)  |  Study (157)  |  Suffrage (2)  |  Truth (450)  |  Value Of Mathematics (2)  |  Vanity (8)  |  Wit (13)

Time is defined so that motion looks simple.
In Gravitation (1973).
Science quotes on:  |  Motion (64)  |  Time (170)

To produce a really good biological theory one must try to see through the clutter produced by evolution to the basic mechanisms lying beneath them, realizing that they are likely to be overlaid by other, secondary mechanisms. What seems to physicists to be a hopelessly complicated process may have been what nature found simplest, because nature could only build on what was already there.
What Mad Pursuit (1990), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (83)  |  Complicated (14)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Nature (534)  |  Physicist (74)  |  Process (97)  |  Theory (353)

Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.
'Fragments from a Treatise on Revelation". In Frank E. Manuel, The Religion of Isaac Newton (1974), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Truth (450)

We have simply arrived too late in the history of the universe to see this primordial simplicity easily ... But although the symmetries are hidden from us, we can sense that they are latent in nature, governing everything about us. That's the most exciting idea I know: that nature is much simpler than it looks. Nothing makes me more hopeful that our generation of human beings may actually hold the key to the universe in our hands—that perhaps in our lifetimes we may be able to tell why all of what we see in this immense universe of galaxies and particles is logically inevitable.
Quoted in Nigel Calder, The Key to the Universe: A Report on the New Physics (1978), 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Excitement (20)  |  Galaxy (19)  |  Generation (56)  |  Governing (3)  |  Hidden (15)  |  Hope (50)  |  Inevitability (7)  |  Key (18)  |  Latent (5)  |  Lifetime (10)  |  Logic (132)  |  Nature (534)  |  Particle (45)  |  Sense (104)  |  Symmetry (14)  |  Universe (291)

What attracted me to immunology was that the whole thing seemed to revolve around a very simple experiment: take two different antibody molecules and compare their primary sequences. The secret of antibody diversity would emerge from that. Fortunately at the time I was sufficiently ignorant of the subject not to realise how naive I was being.
From Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1984), collected in Tore Frängsmyr and ‎Jan Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures in Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Antibody (5)  |  Attraction (19)  |  Autobiography (48)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Diversity (32)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Fortunately (3)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Immunology (12)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Naive (3)  |  Primary (9)  |  Realisation (2)  |  Secret (44)  |  Sequence (15)

Why it is that animals, instead of developing in a simple and straightforward way, undergo in the course of their growth a series of complicated changes, during which they often acquire organs which have no function, and which, after remaining visible for a short time, disappear without leaving a trace ... To the Darwinian, the explanation of such facts is obvious. The stage when the tadpole breathes by gills is a repetition of the stage when the ancestors of the frog had not advanced in the scale of development beyond a fish.
In The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour (1885), Vol. 1, 702.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (21)  |  Advance (52)  |  Ancestor (17)  |  Animal (143)  |  Breathe (9)  |  Change (133)  |  Complication (16)  |  Charles Darwin (216)  |  Development (122)  |  Disappearance (15)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Fact (325)  |  Fish (33)  |  Frog (24)  |  Function (41)  |  Growth (70)  |  Leaving (4)  |  Obvious (24)  |  Organ (40)  |  Remain (18)  |  Repetition (18)  |  Series (18)  |  Stage (15)  |  Trace (10)  |  Undergo (4)  |  Visibility (6)

You may object that by speaking of simplicity and beauty I am introducing aesthetic criteria of truth, and I frankly admit that I am strongly attracted by the simplicity and beauty of mathematical schemes which nature presents us. You must have felt this too: the almost frightening simplicity and wholeness of the relationship, which nature suddenly spreads out before us.
Letter to Albert Einstein. In Ian Stewart, Why Beauty is Truth (), 278.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (10)  |  Attract (5)  |  Beauty (88)  |  Criteria (5)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Nature (534)  |  Relationship (37)  |  Scheme (8)  |  Spread (7)  |  Truth (450)

[Decimal currency is desirable because] by that means all calculations of interest, exchange, insurance, and the like are rendered much more simple and accurate, and, of course, more within the power of the great mass of people. Whenever such things require much labor, time, and reflection, the greater number who do not know, are made the dupes of the lesser number who do.
Letter to Congress (15 Jan 1782). 'Coinage Scheme Proposed by Robert Morris, Superintendent of Finance', from MS. letters and reports of the Superintendent of Finance, No, 137, Vol. 1, 289-300. Reprinted as Appendix, in Executive Documents, Senate of the U.S., Third Session of the Forty-Fifth Congress, 1878-79 (1879), 430.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (34)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Decimal (8)  |  Dupe (2)  |  Exchange (3)  |  Insurance (7)  |  Interest (82)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Labor (18)  |  People (72)  |  Reflection (26)  |  Requirement (27)  |  Time (170)

[It] may be laid down as a general rule that, if the result of a long series of precise observations approximates a simple relation so closely that the remaining difference is undetectable by observation and may be attributed to the errors to which they are liable, then this relation is probably that of nature.
'Mémoire sur les Inégalites Séculaires des Planètes et des Satellites' (I 785, published 1787). In Oeuvres completes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 11, 57, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Approximation (8)  |  Attribute (12)  |  Difference (135)  |  Error (152)  |  Nature (534)  |  Observation (264)  |  Precision (19)  |  Relation (35)  |  Result (129)  |  Rule (52)  |  Series (18)  |  Undetectable (2)

[The steamboat] will answer for sea voyages as well as for inland navigation, in particular for packets, where there may be a great number of passengers. He is also of opinion, that fuel for a short voyage would not exceed the weight of water for a long one, and it would produce a constant supply of fresh water. ... [T]he boat would make head against the most violent tempests, and thereby escape the danger of a lee shore; and that the same force may be applied to a pump to free a leaky ship of her water. ... [T]he good effects of the machine, is the almost omnipotent force by which it is actuated, and the very simple, easy, and natural way by which the screws or paddles are turned to answer the purpose of oars.
[This letter was written in 1785, before the first steamboat carried a man (Fitch) on 27 Aug 1787.]
Letter to Benjamin Franklin (12 Oct 1785), in The Works of Benjamin Franklin (1882), Vol. 10, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Danger (32)  |  Ease (20)  |  Fuel (16)  |  Leak (3)  |  Machine (56)  |  Natural (48)  |  Navigation (6)  |  Oar (2)  |  Omnipotent (3)  |  Packet (2)  |  Passenger (3)  |  Pump (4)  |  Screw (3)  |  Sea (57)  |  Ship (18)  |  Steamboat (3)  |  Tempest (3)  |  Violent (2)  |  Voyage (2)

[The] structural theory is of extreme simplicity. It assumes that the molecule is held together by links between one atom and the next: that every kind of atom can form a definite small number of such links: that these can be single, double or triple: that the groups may take up any position possible by rotation round the line of a single but not round that of a double link: finally that with all the elements of the first short period [of the periodic table], and with many others as well, the angles between the valencies are approximately those formed by joining the centre of a regular tetrahedron to its angular points. No assumption whatever is made as to the mechanism of the linkage. Through the whole development of organic chemistry this theory has always proved capable of providing a different structure for every different compound that can be isolated. Among the hundreds of thousands of known substances, there are never more isomeric forms than the theory permits.
Presidential Address to the Chemical Society (16 Apr 1936), Journal of the Chemical Society (1936), 533.
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (8)  |  Assumption (27)  |  Atom (164)  |  Capability (27)  |  Compound (35)  |  Development (122)  |  Double (6)  |  Isolated (5)  |  Isomer (4)  |  Link (12)  |  Linkage (3)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Organic Chemistry (27)  |  Permit (8)  |  Rotation (5)  |  Single (26)  |  Structure (104)  |  Tetrahedron (3)  |  Theory (353)

[When nature appears complicated:] The moment we contemplate it as it is, and attain a position from which we can take a commanding view, though but of a small part of its plan, we never fail to recognize that sublime simplicity on which the mind rests satisfied that it has attained the truth.
Concluding remark in Dionysius Lardner (ed.), Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Vol 1, Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831), 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Attainment (23)  |  Contemplation (17)  |  Nature (534)  |  Plan (40)  |  Recognition (38)  |  Sublime (10)  |  Truth (450)  |  View (48)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton