Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Teaching

Teaching Quotes (64 quotes)

Dilbert: Evolution must be true because it is a logical conclusion of the scientific method.
Dogbert: But science is based on the irrational belief that because we cannot perceive reality all at once, things called "time" and "cause and effect" exist.
Dilbert: That's what I was taught and that's what I believe.
Dogbert: Sounds cultish.
Dilbert comic strip (8 Feb 1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Cause And Effect (4)  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Existence (150)  |  Irrational (2)  |  Logic (132)  |  Perception (21)  |  Reality (67)  |  Science (875)  |  Scientific Method (101)  |  Time (170)  |  Truth (450)

L'art d'enseigner n'est que l'art d'éveiller la curiosité des jeunes âmes pour la satisfaire ensuite.
The whole art of teaching is only the art of awakening the natural curiosity of young minds for the purpose of satisfying it afterwards.
The Crime of Sylvestre Bonnard (1894) translated by Lafcadio Hearn, in The Works of Anatole France in an English Translation (1920), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (90)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Mind (272)

Question: Explain why pipes burst in cold weather.
Answer: People who have not studied acoustics think that Thor bursts the pipes, but we know that is nothing of the kind for Professor Tyndall has burst the mythologies and has taught us that it is the natural behaviour of water (and bismuth) without which all fish would die and the earth be held in an iron grip. (1881)
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1881), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 186-7, Question 10. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.) Webmaster notes that “fish would die” may refer to being taught that water's greatest density is at 4°C, and sinks below a frozen surface, so bodies of water can remain liquid underneath, to the benefit of the fish. The student was likely taught that bismuth, like water, expands when it freezes.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Behaviour (23)  |  Bismuth (4)  |  Blunder (9)  |  Burst (12)  |  Cold (24)  |  Death (183)  |  Earth (250)  |  Examination (47)  |  Fish (33)  |  Freezing (8)  |  Grip (4)  |  Ice (17)  |  Iron (33)  |  Mythology (3)  |  Natural (48)  |  Pipe (4)  |  Question (159)  |  Schoolboy (3)  |  Study (157)  |  John Tyndall (38)  |  Water (122)  |  Weather (10)

[Responding to a student whose friend asked about studying Agricultural Chemistry at Johns Hopkins:]
We would be glad to have your friend come here to study, but tell him that we teach Chemistry here and not Agricultural Chemistry, nor any other special kind of chemistry. ... We teach Chemistry.
In Frederick Hutton Getman, The Life of Ira Remsen, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Kind (27)  |  Special (25)

A few days ago, a Master of Arts, who is still a young man, and therefore the recipient of a modern education, stated to me that until he had reached the age of twenty he had never been taught anything whatever regarding natural phenomena, or natural law. Twelve years of his life previously had been spent exclusively amongst the ancients. The case, I regret to say, is typical. Now we cannot, without prejudice to humanity, separate the present from the past.
'On the Study of Physics', From a Lecture delivered in the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Spring of 1854. Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 1, 284-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (60)  |  Ancient (27)  |  Education (177)  |  Humanity (46)  |  Law (273)  |  Life (460)  |  Man (258)  |  Modern (44)  |  Natural (48)  |  Past (42)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Prejudice (31)  |  Present (36)  |  Previous (5)  |  Recipient (2)  |  Regret (8)  |  Separation (23)  |  Statement (28)  |  Twelve (2)  |  Twenty (4)  |  Typical (6)  |  Young (20)

A man would have to be an idiot to write a book of laws for an apple tree telling it to bear apples and not thorns, seeing that the apple-tree will do it naturally and far better than any laws or teaching can prescribe.
On Secular Authority (1523). In Harro Höpfl (ed.), Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority (1991), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (13)  |  Bear (6)  |  Better (41)  |  Book (100)  |  Idiot (10)  |  Law (273)  |  Natural (48)  |  Thorn (2)  |  Tree (88)  |  Writing (50)

And this is the ultimate lesson that our knowledge of the mode of transmission of typhus has taught us: Man carries on his skin a parasite, the louse. Civilization rids him of it. Should man regress, should he allow himself to resemble a primitive beast, the louse begins to multiply again and treats man as he deserves, as a brute beast. This conclusion would have endeared itself to the warm heart of Alfred Nobel. My contribution to it makes me feel less unworthy of the honour which you have conferred upon me in his name.
'Investigations on Typhus', Nobel Lecture, 1928. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1922-1941 (1965), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Beast (14)  |  Brute (5)  |  Civilization (90)  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Honour (20)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Lesson (14)  |  Louse (3)  |  Man (258)  |  Mode (8)  |  Alfred Bernhard Nobel (8)  |  Parasite (17)  |  Primitive (17)  |  Resemblance (15)  |  Skin (8)  |  Transmission (18)  |  Typhus (2)  |  Ultimate (27)  |  Unworthy (4)

As for the excellent little wretches who grow up in what they are taught, with never a scruple or a query, ... they signify nothing in the intellectual life of the race.
'Poet at the Breakfast-Table', The Atlantic Monthly (Oct 1872), 429.
Science quotes on:  |  Intellect (99)  |  Learning (130)  |  Life (460)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Query (3)  |  Significance (30)  |  Wretch (3)

Astronomy taught us our insignificance in Nature.
In 'Historic Notes of Life and Letters in New England', Emerson's Complete Works: Lectures and Biographical Sketches (1883), 317.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (105)  |  Insignificance (7)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Nature (534)

Coolidge is a better example of evolution than either Bryan or Darrow, for he knows when not to talk, which is the biggest asset the monkey possesses over the human.
[Referring to the Scopes trial, with Darrow defending a teacher being prosecuted for teaching evolution in the state of Tennessee.]
'Rogers Thesaurus'. Saturday Review (25 Aug 1962). In Will Rogers' Weekly Articles (1981), Vol. 2, 66.
Science quotes on:  |  William Jennings Bryan (13)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Human (168)  |  Monkey (26)  |  Politics (52)  |  John T. Scopes (4)

Creatures that by a rule in nature teach
The act of order to a peopled kingdom.
They have a king and officers of sorts;
Where some, like magistrates, correct at home,
Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad,
Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings,
Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds;
Which pillage they with merry march bring home
To the tent-royal of their emperor.
Who, busied in his majesty, surveys
The singing masons building roofs of gold;
The civil citizens kneading up the honey;
The poor mechanic porters crowding
Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate;
The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum,
Delivering o'er to executors pale
The lazy yawning drone.
Henry V (1599), I, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (3)  |  Burden (9)  |  Citizen (11)  |  Creature (51)  |  Gate (4)  |  Gold (19)  |  Honey (4)  |  Justice (11)  |  King (11)  |  Kingdom (18)  |  Majesty (4)  |  Mason (2)  |  Merchant (4)  |  Nature (534)  |  Officer (2)  |  Order (60)  |  Roof (5)  |  Soldier (2)  |  Sting (3)  |  Tent (3)  |  Velvet (2)

Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.
In his dialogue 'The Critic As Artist', collected in Intentions (1904), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (5)  |  Education (177)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Remember (19)  |  Time (170)  |  Worth (30)

Every utterance from government - from justifying 90-day detention to invading other countries [and] to curtailing civil liberties - is about the dangers of religious division and fundamentalism. Yet New Labour is approving new faith schools hand over fist. We have had the grotesque spectacle of a British prime minister, on the floor of the House of Commons, defending - like some medieval crusader - the teaching of creationism in the science curriculum at a sponsor-run school whose running costs are wholly met from the public purse.
In The Guardian (10 Apr 2006).
Science quotes on:  |  Approval (4)  |  Britain (7)  |  Cost (15)  |  Country (43)  |  Creationism (5)  |  Curriculum (6)  |  Danger (32)  |  Defense (8)  |  Division (19)  |  Faith (73)  |  Floor (6)  |  Government (50)  |  Grotesque (2)  |  Invasion (5)  |  Justification (20)  |  Public (35)  |  Religion (120)  |  Running (4)  |  School (36)  |  Science (875)  |  Spectacle (4)  |  Sponsor (2)  |  Utterance (3)  |  Wholly (3)

Experiment is the sole source of truth. It alone can teach us something new; it alone can give us certainty.
Science and Hypothesis (1902), trans. W. J. G. and preface by J. Larmor (1905), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (59)  |  Experiment (369)  |  New (107)  |  Truth (450)

Failure is so much more interesting because you learn from it. That's what we should be teaching children at school, that being successful the first time, there's nothing in it. There's no interest, you learn nothing actually.
Interview with Carole Cadwalladr, The Observer (9 May 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Child (90)  |  Failure (58)  |  First (42)  |  Interest (82)  |  Learning (130)  |  Nothing (89)  |  School (36)  |  Success (114)  |  Time (170)

For me the most beautiful thing about Meccano is that it teaches you to think.
As quoted in by Hugh Schofield in web article 'Meccano Revives French Production' (23 Dec 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (88)  |  Meccano (5)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Toy (8)

Genius is supposed to be a power of producing excellences which are put of the reach of the rules of art: a power which no precepts can teach, and which no industry can acquire.
From 'A Discourse Delivered to the Students of the Royal Academy, on the Distribution of Prizes' (10 Dec 1774), in Seven Discourses Delivered in the Royal Academy (1778), 202-203.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (7)  |  Art (80)  |  Excellence (18)  |  Genius (92)  |  Industry (49)  |  Precept (3)  |  Reach (30)  |  Rule (52)

God help the teacher, if a man of sensibility and genius, when a booby father presents him with his booby son, and insists on lighting up the rays of science in a fellow's head whose skull is impervious and inaccessible by any other way than a positive fracture with a cudgel.
In a letter to Mr. Cunningham, 11 Jun 1791. Quoted in James Wood Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 126:18.

He who knows not, and knows not he knows not, he is a fool—shun him;
He who knows not, and knows he knows not, he is simple—teach him;
He who knows, and knows not he knows, he is asleep—wake him;
He who knows, and knows he knows, he is wise—follow him.
Anonymous
Hesiod, 'Works and Days,' 293-7. In William White, Notes and Queries (1904), Series 10, Vol. 1, 235, the correspondent H.A. Strong says that the origin of these lines is to be found in Hesiod [Greek, 8th Century B.C.], Works and Days, 293-7; that the passage was very celebrated in antiquity, and is quoted by Aristotle, Nic. Eth., i. 4; and that both Livy (xxii. 29) and Cicero (Pro Cluent., 31) refer to it. Another correspondent (J.H.K.) said it was stated to be an Arab proverb in Lady [Isabel] Burton, Life of [Captain] Sir Richard [F.] Burton [(1894, Vol. 1, 548, footnote, wherein the quote begins 'Men are four.'].
Science quotes on:  |  Follow (20)  |  Fool (32)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Shun (3)  |  Simple (25)  |  Sleep (25)  |  Wisdom (91)

History teaches us that men and nations behave wisely once they have exhausted all other alternatives.
Speech, London (16 Dec 1970), 'Israel's International Relations in an Era of Peace', (1979), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (11)  |  Behaviour (23)  |  Exhaust (4)  |  History (156)  |  Nation (47)

How to start on my adventure—how to become a forester—was not so simple. There were no schools of Forestry in America. ... Whoever turned his mind toward Forestry in those days thought little about the forest itself and more about its influences, and about its influence on rainfall first of all. So I took a course in meteorology, which has to do with weather and climate. and another in botany, which has to do with the vegetable kingdom—trees are unquestionably vegetable. And another in geology, for forests grow out of the earth. Also I took a course in astronomy, for it is the sun which makes trees grow. All of which is as it should be, because science underlies the forester's knowledge of the woods. So far I was headed right. But as for Forestry itself, there wasn't even a suspicion of it at Yale. The time for teaching Forestry as a profession was years away.
In Breaking New Ground (1947, 1998), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (105)  |  Biography (199)  |  Botany (30)  |  Climate (28)  |  Earth (250)  |  Forester (2)  |  Forestry (5)  |  Geology (145)  |  Growth (70)  |  Influence (47)  |  Kingdom (18)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Meteorology (15)  |  Profession (26)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Sun (115)  |  Suspicion (14)  |  Tree (88)  |  Underlie (2)  |  Vegetable (12)  |  Weather (10)  |  Wood (16)

I was pretty good in science. But again, because of the small budget, in science class we couldn't do experiments in order to prove theories. We just believed everything. Actually I think that class was call Religion. Religion was always an easy class. All you had to do was suspend the logic and reasoning you were taught in all the other classes.
In autobiography, Brain Droppings (1998), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Biography (199)  |  Class (27)  |  Easiness (2)  |  Everything (38)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Good (81)  |  Logic (132)  |  Proof (136)  |  Reasoning (56)  |  School (36)  |  Science (875)  |  Science And Religion (159)  |  Suspension (4)  |  Theory (353)

I was taught that the way of progress is neither swift nor easy.
In Pierre Curie (1936), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Easy (14)  |  Neither (4)  |  Progress (200)  |  Swift (2)  |  Way (31)

I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.
Walden (1854), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (183)  |  Deliberately (3)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Essential (41)  |  Fact (325)  |  Front (3)  |  Learning (130)  |  Life (460)  |  Woods (4)

I'll teach you differences.
King Lear (1605-6), I, iv.
Science quotes on:  |  Difference (135)

If the question were, “What ought to be the next objective in science?” my answer would be the teaching of science to the young, so that when the whole population grew up there would be a far more general background of common sense, based on a knowledge of the real meaning of the scientific method of discovering truth.
Marion Savin Selections from the Scientific Correspondence of Elihu Thomson (1971), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Background (13)  |  Base (10)  |  Common Sense (34)  |  Discovery (360)  |  General (26)  |  Growth (70)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Next (4)  |  Objective (18)  |  Population (41)  |  Question (159)  |  Real (28)  |  Science (875)  |  Scientific Method (101)  |  Truth (450)  |  Whole (46)  |  Young (20)

In 1847 I gave an address at Newton, Mass., before a Teachers’ Institute conducted by Horace Mann. My subject was grasshoppers. I passed around a large jar of these insects, and made every teacher take one and hold it while I was speaking. If any one dropped the insect, I stopped till he picked it up. This was at that time a great innovation, and excited much laughter and derision. There can be no true progress in the teaching of natural science until such methods become general.
Science quotes on:  |  Address (3)  |  Derision (2)  |  Drop (7)  |  Excitement (20)  |  General (26)  |  Grasshopper (2)  |  Great (62)  |  Hold (21)  |  Innovation (28)  |  Insect (38)  |  Institute (3)  |  Jar (5)  |  Laughter (11)  |  Horace Mann (16)  |  Method (73)  |  Natural Science (29)  |  Pass (20)  |  Pick (6)  |  Progress (200)  |  Speak (13)  |  Stop (25)  |  Subject (51)  |  Teacher (54)  |  Time (170)  |  True (29)

In fact, Gentlemen, no geometry without arithmetic, no mechanics without geometry... you cannot count upon success, if your mind is not sufficiently exercised on the forms and demonstrations of geometry, on the theories and calculations of arithmetic ... In a word, the theory of proportions is for industrial teaching, what algebra is for the most elevated mathematical teaching.
... a l'ouverture du cours de mechanique industrielle á Metz (1827), 2-3, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (21)  |  Arithmetic (38)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Demonstration (29)  |  Elevation (4)  |  Exercise (26)  |  Form (70)  |  Gentlemen (4)  |  Geometry (68)  |  Industry (49)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Mechanics (27)  |  Mind (272)  |  Proportion (24)  |  Success (114)  |  Theory (353)  |  Word (97)

It is better to have a few forms well known than to teach a little about many hundred species. Better a dozen specimens thoroughly studied as the result of the first year’s work, than to have two thousand dollars’ worth of shells and corals bought from a curiosity-shop. The dozen animals would be your own.
Lecture at a teaching laboratory on Penikese Island, Buzzard's Bay. Quoted from the lecture notes by David Starr Jordan, Science Sketches (1911), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (143)  |  Better (41)  |  Buy (8)  |  Coral (5)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Dollar (11)  |  Dozen (3)  |  Form (70)  |  Hundred (11)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Little (29)  |  Result (129)  |  Shell (17)  |  Shop (5)  |  Species (96)  |  Specimen (8)  |  Study (157)  |  Thorough (3)  |  Thousand (32)  |  Worth (30)

It is the very strangeness of nature that makes science engrossing. That ought to be at the center of science teaching. There are more than seven-times-seven types of ambiguity in science, awaiting analysis. The poetry of Wallace Stevens is crystal-clear alongside the genetic code.
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony(1984), 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambiguity (6)  |  Analysis (82)  |  Center (7)  |  Code (8)  |  Genetics (79)  |  Making (18)  |  Nature (534)  |  Ought (3)  |  Poetry (63)  |  Science (875)  |  Seven (3)  |  Wallace Stevens (2)  |  Strangeness (9)  |  Wait (15)

Lecturing after a fashion is easy enough ; teaching is a very different affair. ... The transmission of ideas from one mind to another, in a simple unequivocal form, is not always easy ; but in teaching, the object is not merely to convey the idea, but to give a lively and lasting impression; something that should not merely cause the retention of the image, but in such connection as to excite another process, ' thought.'
Memoirs of John Abernethy (1854), 253.
Science quotes on:  |  Thought (170)

Man does not limit himself to seeing; he thinks and insists on learning the meaning of phenomena whose existence has been revealed to him by observation. So he reasons, compares facts, puts questions to them, and by the answers which he extracts, tests one by another. This sort of control, by means of reasoning and facts, is what constitutes experiment, properly speaking; and it is the only process that we have for teaching ourselves about the nature of things outside us.
In Claude Bernard and Henry Copley Greene (trans.), An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1927, 1957), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Another (5)  |  Answer (96)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Control (41)  |  Existence (150)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Extraction (5)  |  Fact (325)  |  Insistence (5)  |  Learning (130)  |  Limit (34)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Nature Of Things (4)  |  Observation (264)  |  Outside (10)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Process (97)  |  Question (159)  |  Reasoning (56)  |  Revelation (24)  |  See (43)  |  Test (46)  |  Thinking (166)

Nat Sci 5 has turned more scientists into poets, and more poets into scientists, than any course ever taught on this campus.
Magazine
In the Confidential Guide published by The Harvard Crimson, as quoted on his web page by Elijah Wald about the introductory biology course (Nat Sci 5) taught for decades by his father, George Wald.
Science quotes on:  |  Course (25)  |  Poet (26)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Turn (22)  |  George Wald (27)

No science is speedily learned by the noblest genius without tuition.
Isaac Watts. Quoted in Adam Wooléver (ed.), Encyclopædia of Quotations: A Treasury of Wisdom, Wit and Humor, Odd Comparisons and Proverbs (6th ed, 1876), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Education (177)  |  Genius (92)  |  Learning (130)  |  Science (875)  |  Speed (11)

Nothing could have been worse for the development of my mind than Dr. Butler's school, as it was strictly classical, nothing else being taught, except a little ancient geography and history. The school as a means of education to me was simply a blank. During my whole life I have been singularly incapable of mastering any language. Especial attention was paid to versemaking, and this I could never do well. I had many friends, and got together a good collection of old verses, which by patching together, sometimes aided by other boys, I could work into any subject.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (27)  |  Blank (3)  |  Classical (7)  |  Development (122)  |  Education (177)  |  Geography (14)  |  History (156)  |  Language (71)  |  Mind (272)  |  Poetry (63)  |  School (36)  |  Verse (7)

Only dead mathematics can be taught where the attitude of competition prevails: living mathematics must always be a communal possession.
In Mary Everest Boole: Collected Works (1931), Vol. 3, 1008.
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (16)  |  Competition (18)  |  Dead (16)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Possession (24)  |  Prevail (4)

People have now-a-days got a strange opinion that everything should be taught by lectures. Now, I cannot see that lectures can do so much good as reading the books from which the lectures are taken. I know nothing that can best be taught by lectures, except where experiments are to be shewn. You may teach chemistry by lectures.
Elements of Chemistry (1830)
Science quotes on:  |  Experiment (369)  |  Lecture (31)  |  Opinion (81)  |  Strange (17)

Science even more than the Gospel teaches us humility. She cannot look down on anything, she does not know what superiority means, she despises nothing, never lies for the sake of a pose, and conceals nothing out of coquetry. She stops before the facts as an investigator, sometimes as a physician, never as an executioner, and still less with hostility and irony.
My Past and Thoughts: the Memoirs of Alexander Herzen (revised translation 1968, 1982), 639.
Science quotes on:  |  Gospel (3)  |  Humility (12)  |  Science (875)

Science has taught us to think the unthinkable. Because when nature is the guide—rather than a priori prejudices, hopes, fears or desires—we are forced out of our comfort zone. One by one, pillars of classical logic have fallen by the wayside as science progressed in the 20th century, from Einstein's realization that measurements of space and time were not absolute but observer-dependent, to quantum mechanics, which not only put fundamental limits on what we can empirically know but also demonstrated that elementary particles and the atoms they form are doing a million seemingly impossible things at once.
In op-ed, 'A Universe Without Purpose', Los Angeles Times (1 Apr 2012).
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (11)  |  A Priori (8)  |  Absolute (32)  |  Atom (164)  |  Classical (7)  |  Dependence (21)  |  Desire (46)  |  Albert Einstein (174)  |  Falling (3)  |  Fear (53)  |  Guide (17)  |  Hope (50)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Logic (132)  |  Measurement (112)  |  Nature (534)  |  Observer (10)  |  Pillar (2)  |  Prejudice (31)  |  Progress (200)  |  Quantum Mechanics (15)  |  Realization (22)  |  Science (875)  |  Space And Time (4)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Unthinkable (2)  |  Wayside (2)

See that your children be taught, not only the labors of the earth, but the loveliness of it.
In Elbert Hubbard (ed. and publ.), The Philistine (Mar 1908), 26, No. 4, inside front cover, opposite 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Children (14)  |  Earth (250)  |  Labor (18)  |  Loveliness (2)

Select such subjects that your pupils cannot walk out without seeing them. Train your pupils to be observers, and have them provided with the specimens about which you speak. If you can find nothing better, take a house-fly or a cricket, and let each one hold a specimen and examine it as you talk.
Lecture at a teaching laboratory on Penikese Island, Buzzard's Bay. Quoted from the lecture notes by David Starr Jordan, Science Sketches (1911), 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Cricket (5)  |  Examination (47)  |  Hold (21)  |  Observer (10)  |  Provide (13)  |  Pupil (10)  |  Seeing (29)  |  Selection (20)  |  Speak (13)  |  Specimen (8)  |  Subject (51)  |  Talk (21)  |  Training (21)  |  Walk (24)

Speak to the earth and it shall teach thee.
Bible
Book of Job (12:8), The Holy Bible: containing the Old and New Testaments, in the Common Version (1833), 409.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (250)  |  Speaking (30)

Surely it must be admitted that if the conceptions of Physics are presented to the beginner in erroneous language, there is a danger that in many instances these conceptions will never be properly acquired. And is not accurate language as cheap as inaccurate?
A paper read at the Association for the Improvement of Geometrical Teaching (19 Jan 1889), 'The Vices of our Scientific Education', in Nature (6 Jun 1889), 40, 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (34)  |  Acquisition (21)  |  Beginner (3)  |  Cheap (4)  |  Conception (29)  |  Danger (32)  |  Error (152)  |  Inaccuracy (3)  |  Language (71)  |  Physics (156)  |  Proper (9)

Teaching is not a lost art, but the regard for it is a lost tradition.
Teacher in America (1954), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Tradition (17)

That ability to impart knowledge ... what does it consist of? ... a deep belief in the interest and importance of the thing taught, a concern about it amounting to a sort of passion. A man who knows a subject thoroughly, a man so soaked in it that he eats it, sleeps it and dreams it—this man can always teach it with success, no matter how little he knows of technical pedagogy. That is because there is enthusiasm in him, and because enthusiasm is almost as contagious as fear or the barber's itch. An enthusiast is willing to go to any trouble to impart the glad news bubbling within him. He thinks that it is important and valuable for to know; given the slightest glow of interest in a pupil to start with, he will fan that glow to a flame. No hollow formalism cripples him and slows him down. He drags his best pupils along as fast as they can go, and he is so full of the thing that he never tires of expounding its elements to the dullest.
This passion, so unordered and yet so potent, explains the capacity for teaching that one frequently observes in scientific men of high attainments in their specialties—for example, Huxley, Ostwald, Karl Ludwig, Virchow, Billroth, Jowett, William G. Sumner, Halsted and Osler—men who knew nothing whatever about the so-called science of pedagogy, and would have derided its alleged principles if they had heard them stated.
In Prejudices: third series (1922), 241-2.
For a longer excerpt, see H. L. Mencken on Teaching, Enthusiasm and Pedagogy.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (37)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Barber (3)  |  Belief (139)  |  Theodor Billroth (2)  |  Concern (30)  |  Contagion (4)  |  Derision (2)  |  Dream (39)  |  Enthusiasm (20)  |  Fear (53)  |  Flame (13)  |  Formalism (4)  |  Glow (4)  |  William Stewart Halsted (2)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (77)  |  Importance (106)  |  Interest (82)  |  Itch (4)  |  Benjamin Jowett (2)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig (3)  |  Men Of Science (90)  |  News (6)  |  Sir William Osler (16)  |  Ostwald_Carl (2)  |  Passion (24)  |  Pupil (10)  |  Sleep (25)  |  Specialty (6)  |  Subject (51)  |  Value (63)  |  Rudolf Virchow (27)

The energy available for each individual man is his income, and the philosophy which can teach him to be content with penury should be capable of teaching him also the uses of wealth.
Science and Life: Aberdeen Addresses (1920), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Availability (9)  |  Capability (27)  |  Contentment (8)  |  Energy (103)  |  Income (4)  |  Individual (59)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Wealth (29)

The field of scientific abstraction encompasses independent kingdoms of ideas and of experiments and within these, rulers whose fame outlasts the centuries. But they are not the only kings in science. He also is a king who guides the spirit of his contemporaries by knowledge and creative work, by teaching and research in the field of applied science, and who conquers for science provinces which have only been raided by craftsmen.
While president of the German Chemical Society, making memorial remarks dedicated to the deceased Professor Lunge (Jan 1923). As quoted in Richard Willstätter, Arthur Stoll (ed. of the original German) and Lilli S. Hornig (trans.), From My Life: The Memoirs of Richard Willstätter (1958), 174-175.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (10)  |  Applied Science (16)  |  Century (38)  |  Conquer (5)  |  Contemporary (10)  |  Craftsman (2)  |  Creativity (45)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Fame (21)  |  Field (69)  |  Guide (17)  |  Idea (226)  |  Independent (16)  |  King (11)  |  Kingdom (18)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Province (5)  |  Raid (2)  |  Research (360)  |  Ruler (5)  |  Scientific (55)  |  Spirit (52)

The first steps in Agriculture, Astronomy, Zoology, (those first steps which the farmer, the hunter, and the sailor take,) teach that nature's dice are always loaded; that in her heaps and rubbish are concealed sure and useful results.
In Nature (1849), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (19)  |  Astronomy (105)  |  Concealment (7)  |  Dice (8)  |  Farmer (9)  |  Heap (6)  |  Hunter (3)  |  Loaded (2)  |  Nature (534)  |  Result (129)  |  Rubbish (5)  |  Sailor (2)  |  Step (26)  |  Useful (15)  |  Zoology (12)

The history of science teaches only too plainly the lesson that no single method is absolutely to be relied upon, that sources of error lurk where they are least expected, and that they may escape the notice of the most experienced and conscientious worker.
Transactions of the Sections', Reports of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1883), 438.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (32)  |  Error (152)  |  Escape (14)  |  Expectation (26)  |  Experience (132)  |  History Of Science (34)  |  Least (6)  |  Lesson (14)  |  Lurking (2)  |  Method (73)  |  Notice (11)  |  Reliance (4)  |  Single (26)  |  Source (33)  |  Worker (11)

The largest land animal is the elephant, and it is the nearest to man in intelligence: it understands the language of its country and obeys orders, remembers duties that it has been taught, is pleased by affection and by marks of honour, nay more it possesses virtues rare even in man, honesty, wisdom, justice, also respect for the stars and reverence for the sun and moon.
Natural History, 8, I. Trans. H. Rackham, Pliny: Natural History (1947), Vol. 3, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (8)  |  Animal (143)  |  Country (43)  |  Duty (26)  |  Elephant (5)  |  Honesty (11)  |  Honour (20)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Justice (11)  |  Language (71)  |  Largest (4)  |  Man (258)  |  Mark (14)  |  Moon (78)  |  Obedience (9)  |  Order (60)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Possession (24)  |  Rarity (6)  |  Remembering (3)  |  Respect (24)  |  Reverence (14)  |  Star (132)  |  Sun (115)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Virtue (27)  |  Wisdom (91)

The object of teaching a child is to enable him to get along without his teacher.
Used as epigraph on cover of Harry Persons Taber and Elbert Hubbard, The Philistine: A Periodical of Protest (Apr 1902), Vol. 14, 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (90)  |  Enabling (6)  |  Object (47)  |  Teacher (54)

The question is not: How can we justify the unobstructed teaching of evolution in public schools? The question, of course, is: How can we not?
In online article, 'The Day That Botany Took on Bobby Jindal by Just Being Itself', Huffington Post (5 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Evolution (342)  |  Justify (2)  |  Question (159)

There is in the chemist a form of thought by which all ideas become visible in the mind as strains of an imagined piece of music. This form of thought is developed in Faraday in the highest degree, whence it arises that to one who is not acquainted with this method of thinking, his scientific works seem barren and dry, and merely a series of researches strung together, while his oral discourse when he teaches or explains is intellectual, elegant, and of wonderful clearness.
Autobiography, 257-358. Quoted in William H. Brock, Justus Von Liebig (2002), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemist (49)  |  Clarity (24)  |  Michael Faraday (58)  |  Idea (226)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Lecture (31)  |  Music (26)  |  Research (360)  |  Thought (170)

There is no part of the country where in the summer you cannot get a sufficient supply of the best specimens. Teach your children to bring them in for themselves. Take your text from the brooks, not from the booksellers.
Lecture at a teaching laboratory on Penikese Island, Buzzard's Bay. Quoted from the lecture notes by David Starr Jordan, Science Sketches (1911), 146-147.
Science quotes on:  |  Bring (7)  |  Child (90)  |  Country (43)  |  Specimen (8)  |  Summer (10)  |  Supply (15)  |  Text (3)

There was a seminar for advanced students in Zürich that I was teaching and von Neumann was in the class. I came to a certain theorem, and I said it is not proved and it may be difficult. Von Neumann didn’t say anything but after five minutes he raised his hand. When I called on him he went to the blackboard and proceeded to write down the proof. After that I was afraid of von Neumann.
In George Pólya and Gerald L. Alexanderson (ed.) The Pólya Picture Album: Encounters of a Mathematician (1987), 154. Also footnoted in Matti Tedre, The Development of Computer Science: a Sociocultural Perspective (2006), 198, cited as from How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (1957), xv.
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (7)  |  Blackboard (5)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Proof (136)  |  Student (54)  |  Theorem (34)  |  John von Neumann (7)  |  Writing (50)

This [the opening of the Vatican City radio station built by Marconi earlier in 1931] was a new demonstration of the harmony between science and religion that each fresh conquest of science ever more luminously confirms, so that one may say that those who speak of the incompatibility of science and religion either make science say that which it never said or make religion say that which it never taught.
Address to Pontifical Academy of Sciences (20 Dec 1931).In Associated Press, 'Pope Sees Harmony in Faith and Science', New York Times (21 Dec 1931), p.9. The pontiff said the opening of the radio station was “crowned by the publication of a radiophonic newspaper.”
Science quotes on:  |  Conquest (7)  |  Demonstration (29)  |  Harmony (27)  |  Luminous (2)  |  Never (19)  |  Radio (16)  |  Religion (120)  |  French Saying (51)  |  Science (875)  |  Science And Religion (159)  |  Speaking (30)

To teach is to learn twice.
Pensées and Letters of Joseph Joubert (1928), 122.
Science quotes on:  |  Learning (130)

Train yourselves. Don't wait to be fed knowledge out of a book. Get out and seek it. Make explorations. Do your own research work. Train your hands and your mind. Become curious. Invent your own problems and solve them. You can see things going on all about you. Inquire into them. Seek out answers to your own questions. There are many phenomena going on in nature the explanation of which cannot be found in books. Find out why these phenomena take place. Information a boy gets by himself is enormously more valuable than that which is taught to him in school.
In 'Dr. Irving Langmuir', Boys' Life (Jul 1941), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (22)  |  Answer (96)  |  Boy (16)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Enormous (16)  |  Enquiry (72)  |  Exploration (48)  |  Finding (19)  |  Hand (34)  |  Information (56)  |  Invention (174)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Learning (130)  |  Mind (272)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Problem (180)  |  Question (159)  |  Research (360)  |  School (36)  |  Seek (15)  |  Solution (109)  |  Student (54)  |  Train (8)  |  Value (63)

Very nice sort of place, Oxford, I should think, for people that like that sort of place. They teach you to be a gentleman there. In the polytechnic they teach you to be an engineer or such like. See?
Man and Superman: A Comedy and a Philosophy (1903), Act 2, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Engineer (32)  |  Gentleman (5)  |  Oxford (3)

We must also teach science not as the bare body of fact, but more as human endeavor in its historic context—in the context of the effects of scientific thought on every kind of thought. We must teach it as an intellectual pursuit rather than as a body of tricks.
In Kermit Lansner, Second-Rate Brains: A Factual, Perceptive Report by Top Scientists, Educators, Journalists, and Their Urgent Recommendations (1958), 31. Note: Dr. I.I. Rabi was chairman of President Eisenhower's Science Advisory Committee.
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (4)  |  Body (88)  |  Context (7)  |  Effect (72)  |  Endeavour (23)  |  Fact (325)  |  History (156)  |  Human (168)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Pursuit (34)  |  Science (875)  |  Thought (170)  |  Trick (11)

When introduced at the wrong time or place, good logic may be the worst enemy of good teaching.
Quoted, without citation, in The American Mathematical Monthly (Mar 1993), 100 No. 3, 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Enemy (26)  |  Good (81)  |  Introduction (15)  |  Logic (132)  |  Place (32)  |  Worst (7)  |  Wrong (50)

You all have learned reliance
On the sacred teachings of Science,
So I hope, through life, you will never decline
In spite of philistine Defiance
To do what all good scientists do.
Experiment.
Make it your motto day and night.
Experiment.
And it will lead you to the light.
From 'Experiment', a song in the musical Nymph Errant (1933).
Science quotes on:  |  Defiance (2)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Learning (130)  |  Motto (13)  |  Reliance (4)

[There] are still to be found text-books of the old sort, teaching Mathematics under the guise of Physics, presenting nothing but the dry husks of the latter.
A paper read at the Association for the Improvement of Geometrical Teaching (19 Jan 1889), 'The Vices of our Scientific Education', in Nature (6 Jun 1889), 40, 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Dry (8)  |  Husk (3)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Physics (156)  |  Textbook (11)

[The] humanization of mathematical teaching, the bringing of the matter and the spirit of mathematics to bear not merely upon certain fragmentary faculties of the mind, but upon the whole mind, that this is the greatest desideratum is. I assume, beyond dispute.
Address (28 Mar 1912), Michigan School Masters' Club, Ann Arbor, 'The Humanization of the Teaching of Mathematics. Printed in Science (26 Apr 1912). Collected in The Human Worth of Rigorous Thinking: Essays and Addresses (1916), 62-63.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (6)  |  Desideratum (2)  |  Faculty (21)  |  Greatest (23)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Mind (272)  |  Spirit (52)  |  Whole (46)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton